Are you willing to help the homeless?

83 Replies | Chattanooga, Tennessee

Originally posted by @Patrick Chiles :

There is a program under HUD (Emergency Solutions Grant Program) that provides money and incentives to property owners to rent their properties to people who are currently experiencing homelessness. And within this program is the Rapid Re-Housing program that can pay a lease up to 12 months in advance, pay double the security deposit, and pay the landlord a signing bonus of up to 3 times the monthly rent. The program is managed differently in every state and I would encourage owners and property managers to check it out. Seek out departments and non-profits that work with the homeless in your community and ask about the Rapid Re-Housing program. The recently approved CARES Act allocated a lot of money to this program and organizations are having a hard time spending it all.

 Problem with this is double the security deposit and a triple signing bonus is a drop in the bucket compared to the costs renting to this segment of the population is going to cost landlords. On average these kinds of people are going to do 10x the damage of these miniscule incentives.

Originally posted by @Bruce Woodruff :

No fricking way!!! People are homeless for a reason (Most). Even those that 'fell on hard times through no fault of their own' - Ha - are suspect in their ability or caring to take good care of a home...

 Lol the only people who think homeless people became that way through no fault of their own think all hookers act and look like Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman.

Originally posted by @James Wise :
Originally posted by @Patrick Chiles:

There is a program under HUD (Emergency Solutions Grant Program) that provides money and incentives to property owners to rent their properties to people who are currently experiencing homelessness. And within this program is the Rapid Re-Housing program that can pay a lease up to 12 months in advance, pay double the security deposit, and pay the landlord a signing bonus of up to 3 times the monthly rent. The program is managed differently in every state and I would encourage owners and property managers to check it out. Seek out departments and non-profits that work with the homeless in your community and ask about the Rapid Re-Housing program. The recently approved CARES Act allocated a lot of money to this program and organizations are having a hard time spending it all.

 Problem with this is double the security deposit and a triple signing bonus is a drop in the bucket compared to the costs renting to this segment of the population is going to cost landlords. On average these kinds of people are going to do 10x the damage of these miniscule incentives.

Just look at how the homesless live in Portland Oregon.. they just throw their trash right out the front door of their tent there is garbage everywhere so I can only imagine what they do to peoples houses..  rentals for lower end income is savage enough to add this element. 

 @Patrick Chiles   I understand the point of those programs but just the money being laid out tells you how risky they are for landlords.  I almost believe there should be a rapid eviction program to go with the rapid rehousing program, you break the rules you are out, no benefits.  Might make it slightly more attractive.   I do think we need more boarding house type arrangements with supervision.  75 % of the  homeless are single, a number of these are mentally ill, and there are many mentally ill that aren't able to live in typical housing so supervised boarding homes would be a better option. There is no reason to provide apartments or houses to this population, rooms would meet the need. Most of the remainder of the homeless are Single mothers with children. I feel for these kids the most but that doesn't mean that I would necessarily accept that mom as a tenant if she couldn't live appropriately in the home. Some of these people are on the street because even their family can't live with them. For some it is a lifestyle choice.   I don't want to have the experience of @Linda S. where 30% were evicted and there were alot of damages.  There is also something to be said for having some contribution to your housing. People do not appreciate things they don't have to work for in some way. 

@Jay Hinrichs  the governments housing is the projects and we all see how that worked. The CCC was a work program and I am not sure how many of these people would survive working. 

I used to work with a nurse who suggested we should ship all the addicts to an island and not come back but we came to the conclusion that unfortunately we would just have new addicts to deal with so isolation isn't really a viable solution.

Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs :
Originally posted by @James Wise:
Originally posted by @Patrick Chiles:

There is a program under HUD (Emergency Solutions Grant Program) that provides money and incentives to property owners to rent their properties to people who are currently experiencing homelessness. And within this program is the Rapid Re-Housing program that can pay a lease up to 12 months in advance, pay double the security deposit, and pay the landlord a signing bonus of up to 3 times the monthly rent. The program is managed differently in every state and I would encourage owners and property managers to check it out. Seek out departments and non-profits that work with the homeless in your community and ask about the Rapid Re-Housing program. The recently approved CARES Act allocated a lot of money to this program and organizations are having a hard time spending it all.

 Problem with this is double the security deposit and a triple signing bonus is a drop in the bucket compared to the costs renting to this segment of the population is going to cost landlords. On average these kinds of people are going to do 10x the damage of these miniscule incentives.

Just look at how the homesless live in Portland Oregon.. they just throw their trash right out the front door of their tent there is garbage everywhere so I can only imagine what they do to peoples houses..  rentals for lower end income is savage enough to add this element. 

Yup. Myself I'm in the business of making non paying junkies homeless. Not the business of taking non paying junkies who are already homeless and putting them in my houses lol.

Originally posted by @James Wise :
Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs:
Originally posted by @James Wise:
Originally posted by @Patrick Chiles:

There is a program under HUD (Emergency Solutions Grant Program) that provides money and incentives to property owners to rent their properties to people who are currently experiencing homelessness. And within this program is the Rapid Re-Housing program that can pay a lease up to 12 months in advance, pay double the security deposit, and pay the landlord a signing bonus of up to 3 times the monthly rent. The program is managed differently in every state and I would encourage owners and property managers to check it out. Seek out departments and non-profits that work with the homeless in your community and ask about the Rapid Re-Housing program. The recently approved CARES Act allocated a lot of money to this program and organizations are having a hard time spending it all.

 Problem with this is double the security deposit and a triple signing bonus is a drop in the bucket compared to the costs renting to this segment of the population is going to cost landlords. On average these kinds of people are going to do 10x the damage of these miniscule incentives.

Just look at how the homesless live in Portland Oregon.. they just throw their trash right out the front door of their tent there is garbage everywhere so I can only imagine what they do to peoples houses..  rentals for lower end income is savage enough to add this element. 

Yup. Myself I'm in the business of making non paying junkies homeless. Not the business of taking non paying junkies who are already homeless and putting them in my houses lol.

Ya not sure BP is the most receptive audiance for this type of social programs.  Although many love section 8

Originally posted by @Scott Mac :

Just build something like 1 story 300 sq ft rowhouses.

Bed, bath, kitchenet rooms out of concrete like a tilt-up, each with their own door outside.

Row after row, and blacktop between the rows.

If it fills up, build more concrete tilt up row houses.

Who pays for this? Building tilt-ups is expensive even for the private sector....then you throw in the government and their unions and prevailing wage and this is billions and billions of dollars......

Originally posted by @Bruce Woodruff :
Originally posted by @Scott Mac:

Just build something like 1 story 300 sq ft rowhouses.

Bed, bath, kitchenet rooms out of concrete like a tilt-up, each with their own door outside.

Row after row, and blacktop between the rows.

If it fills up, build more concrete tilt up row houses.

Who pays for this? Building tilt-ups is expensive even for the private sector....then you throw in the government and their unions and prevailing wage and this is billions and billions of dollars......

In seattle they bought 750k condo project and houses them there.. thats 750k a door..  

Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs :
Originally posted by @Bruce Woodruff:
Originally posted by @Scott Mac:

Just build something like 1 story 300 sq ft rowhouses.

Bed, bath, kitchenet rooms out of concrete like a tilt-up, each with their own door outside.

Row after row, and blacktop between the rows.

If it fills up, build more concrete tilt up row houses.

Who pays for this? Building tilt-ups is expensive even for the private sector....then you throw in the government and their unions and prevailing wage and this is billions and billions of dollars......

In seattle they bought 750k condo project and houses them there.. thats 750k a door..  

And the "Problem Behavior" is still in the city vs way out in the countryside.

They solve some of the problem FOR the homeless, but not the problem FOR the Tax paying citizens who want to live free of their street begging and petty crime.

Originally posted by @Scott Mac :
Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs:
Originally posted by @Bruce Woodruff:
Originally posted by @Scott Mac:

Just build something like 1 story 300 sq ft rowhouses.

Bed, bath, kitchenet rooms out of concrete like a tilt-up, each with their own door outside.

Row after row, and blacktop between the rows.

If it fills up, build more concrete tilt up row houses.

Who pays for this? Building tilt-ups is expensive even for the private sector....then you throw in the government and their unions and prevailing wage and this is billions and billions of dollars......

In seattle they bought 750k condo project and houses them there.. thats 750k a door..  

And the "Problem Behavior" is still in the city vs way out in the countryside.

They solve some of the problem FOR the homeless, but not the problem FOR the Tax paying citizens who want to live free of their street begging and petty crime.

its a cluster for sure and how these cities  ( SF  PDX  SEA ) re letting 4 to 5k people  ruin a city of 800k to 1mil.  just like our peaceful protesters LOL  looting  breaking windows  its simply a government problem no back bone.

As with many programs, the idea is good but implementation will be questionable. The key issues are damage to property and eviction. If the government provided some insurance coverage for damage exceeding the enhanced security deposit (would have to be documented of course) and exception from eviction courts for a speedy eviction, then I am sure many would sign on. Otherwise not worth putting a 100K plus asset in the control of people who are not managing their life well at all.

There is a program for people with emotional problems that is by my house. The people walk by and are somewhat functional. They can break out windows and do all kinds of damage but the owner gets unbelievable huge rent. It was like 10k a month or something crazy. The owner just sends out his handy man to patch the place.

Linda is correct! No warm & fuzzy!  I have a homeless family member, has been for over twenty years. Im not proud of it, and every family member has attempted to help, no luck.   They have to want it.  There was a time when rooming houses were available for those in need. Single rooms with a bathroom down the hall.  For the most part they have disappeared. They are what is desperately needed.  With the oversight to have tenants act like they want to live there. 

Program sounded good until I read the comments. So it’s an H to the no for me. Besides, I like screening my own tenants.

Originally posted by @Jeff S. :

There is a program for people with emotional problems that is by my house. The people walk by and are somewhat functional. They can break out windows and do all kinds of damage but the owner gets unbelievable huge rent. It was like 10k a month or something crazy. The owner just sends out his handy man to patch the place.

well there is always a number that mitigates risk  right ??   

Originally posted by @Jeff S. :

@Patrick Chiles are you participating in this program?

I am an investor, landlord and flipper, but I cannot personally participate on the landlord side because it would be considered a conflict of interest as I am working for a non-profit that offers the program.

If I were able, I would certainly give the program a try.  My role with the program ends in June and at that time I will put a couple of my properties into the program.  I do, however, rent to Section 8 tenants.  

I totally understand all of the concerns that have been voiced.  This is certainly not a program for everyone.  But as you have read, some of the respondents like the Section 8 program and some hate it.  Some people will look for ways to help and others will not .... I get it.  I am sure that every landlord on this post has experienced damage to their homes by people of every economic, racial and cultural background.  Damage is not a homeless problem .... it is a character problem.

In this program, the landlord always has the final say in terms of who gets to live in the house.  And if I were participating, I would interview the case manager as well as the prospective tenant.  And, the management company that I use does regular inspections.  

I did not take on this role because I needed a job or the money, I need neither!  I took it because I saw it as a way to help.  I believe that God has blessed me so that I can bless others.  And this is one way that I can help.  Our program is designed to help people who want to get out of their situation and improve their lives.   While most of us have never been homeless, most of us have been helped by someone, somewhere along the way.  So, I am just trying to help .... trying to make a difference.

Section 8 will pay the delta between 30% of a person's income and the rental price (within pricing guidelines).  But I do not think that they provide any kind of coaching or mentoring.  

This program will pay up to 100% of the rent for a year and provide coaching to help a person learn the life skills that they need in order to become self-sufficient.  Like anything, the person has to want to change in order for the program to work.

@Patrick Chiles ,

I'd happily rent to section 8-- it's essentially a lifelong program, so if a tenant is rough on a house,  they'll probably live there for a long time, so it's worth the risk.     The charity program is a year.    I felt like I was conned because they said it was 2-3 years... nope, it's 1.  House trashed in 1 year!   

As @James Wise said, they will do 5-10x the amount of damage to your house, I wish people could really see first hand and understand!      It's absolutely not worth it!  You don't really know, until you experience that level of filth first hand.

 The last person I ended it with last month (YAY FINAL ONE!!!)-- purposely threw a few pieces of bread behind the hot water heater to get roaches/bugs -- guess what, it worked-- roach infestation.      I now have to call an exterminator, great--- double security deposit is a joke compared to the damage done!   If they don't leave on time, you're out completely as that has to cover rent.   Our worst one I'd estimate cost me about $3,000, on top  of double security deposit-- wanna get money from a person without a job?  It's a joke!  

These people play by different rules,  don't think you'll be an exception, you won't.. you'll just learn why people like me are so salty! 

Originally posted by @Patrick Chiles :
Originally posted by @Jeff S.:

@Patrick Chiles are you participating in this program?

I am an investor, landlord and flipper, but I cannot personally participate on the landlord side because it would be considered a conflict of interest as I am working for a non-profit that offers the program.

If I were able, I would certainly give the program a try.  My role with the program ends in June and at that time I will put a couple of my properties into the program.  I do, however, rent to Section 8 tenants.  

I totally understand all of the concerns that have been voiced.  This is certainly not a program for everyone.  But as you have read, some of the respondents like the Section 8 program and some hate it.  Some people will look for ways to help and others will not .... I get it.  I am sure that every landlord on this post has experienced damage to their homes by people of every economic, racial and cultural background.  Damage is not a homeless problem .... it is a character problem.

In this program, the landlord always has the final say in terms of who gets to live in the house.  And if I were participating, I would interview the case manager as well as the prospective tenant.  And, the management company that I use does regular inspections.  

I did not take on this role because I needed a job or the money, I need neither!  I took it because I saw it as a way to help.  I believe that God has blessed me so that I can bless others.  And this is one way that I can help.  Our program is designed to help people who want to get out of their situation and improve their lives.   While most of us have never been homeless, most of us have been helped by someone, somewhere along the way.  So, I am just trying to help .... trying to make a difference.

 Bro you said damage isn't a homeless problem, it's a character problem. 

How do you expect to be seen as credible in any way when it's absolutely ridiculous that you're ignorant to the fact that homeless people are a much higher level of risk than those who aren't? Like c'mon dude.