Tonight's Waltham Black Diamond: solo 401(k)s for the self employed real estate investor: defer taxes on over 50K worth of income per year and self direct the investment of those funds!

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This event is brought to you by:
  • 04/22/14 06:30PM
  • Ristorante Marcellino, 11 Cooper St, Waltham, Ma
  • Free

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As a self employed real estate investor, are you wondering

how you are going to defer taxes on your income this year? Your IRA allows you to put in up to $6,500 per year depending on age, but that's not much help.And it's going to be a long slow road to build up that nest egg at that rate. If you're working for someone else, they may have a 401(k) plan you can participate in, but if you make the jump to self employment, then what ?

Enter the 401(k) for the self employed: A largely misunderstood and frequently overlooked retirement vehicle, the 401(k) provides huge tax benefits and investing opportunities.

You will learn:

    oWhat a Solo (individual) 401(k) plan is, who can use one and who can’t!

    oThe components of the plans and contribution limits:up to $52,000 per year

    oHuge contributions for full-time self-employed

    oFull-time in a job and working in your real estate business at the same time – when you can use a plan

    oExamples of what you can do with them and with a Self Directed IRA

Rajeev Kotyan is a principal at NUA Advisors, and specializes in non-traditional investments including real estate, notes and other vehicles utilizing self-directed IRAs.Join us as we learn to expand our investing options.

Medium small logoAnn Bellamy, Buy Now, LLC | 800‑418‑0081 | http://www.buynowhardmoney.com | Podcast Guest on Show #9

This looks pretty interesting. Much higher max than traditional or Roth IRA. I'd qualify as being self employed without employees it looks like.

Any catches?