Collect Annual Income by October - My Airbnb Experiment

5 Replies

My first Airbnb stay was in San Francisco in 2012. Right then I knew this concept had legs - it's awesome for reducing your PERSONAL EXPENSES. However back then, it wasn't my first choice for a path to exceeding a landlord's income.  

But since short-stay are now main stream and there are smartphone apps to manage the bookings, a landlord has a good shot at netting more as a short stay provider than as a traditional 1-year lease.

However landlords can't act like home sharer and make an above baseline profit. Short-shorts (one - two night bookings) should be left to home sharers and landlords should focus on long-shorts (month long bookings).

 Check out my Airbnb Landlord Experiment. I'm on track to collect 12 months worth of income in just 10 months with my long-shorts strategy.

You might be able to do this as well... without running yourself ragged, without cleaning your rental yourself, without waiting for laundry to dry, and without answering the same tourist questions again and again.

Not that working with tourist isn't fun. It's very enjoyable... however it's typically not more profitable than a traditional landlord operation.

To get started with working with travelers (instead of tourist) check out Airbnb for Landlords.

@Al Williamson

I curious to know why you drew your line in the sand at 1-month.  As I mentioned in reply to one of your earlier posts, we are just beginning to experiment with using AirBnB in the off-season at our international student house.  We decided to draw out line at 1-week based upon local regulation distinguishing between being a landlord and a hotelier. 

We've priced our week long stay to be competitive with both the university (who let's dorm rooms during the summer months) and local hotels - a week with us is cheaper than 2-3 days in any downtown hotel.

Having recently gone through the inconvenience and expense ($5K) of a beg bug infestation in one of our student houses, that remains one of our biggest concerns w/r to short-term stays.

@Roy N.

Good question. In my town and in most, 30 day+ stays fall into the typical landlording realm - no taxes required. No registration fees or licensing required as well. No need to tell all your neighbors that you're an Airbnb host. 

Yes, bedbugs are a concern. I'm phasing in anti-bed bug mattress liners. My pest control guy says they are worth their weight in gold.

Have you hear about these mattress liners?

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Originally posted by @Al Williamson :

@Roy N.

Good question. In my town and in most, 30 day+ stays fall into the typical landlording realm - no taxes required. No registration fees or licensing required as well. No need to tell all your neighbors that you're an Airbnb host. 

Yes, bedbugs are a concern. I'm phasing in anti-bed bug mattress liners. My pest control guy says they are worth their weight in gold.

Have you hear about these mattress liners?

Al,

We've been using mattress covers/encasements for years ... ones that have no PVC/PEVA or phthalates and are made out of food grade polyethylene.  What we had not been doing was encasing box springs ... so we now have all new and encapsulated box springs.

That's sound like an ideal place for tourists. I don't think it would be good for a traveler looking to embed themselves unless they worked nearby.

However you could play with your long term rates and try to appeal to someone one a temp duty assignment.

Best to you.