Getting funding for Rental Properties

7 Replies

I'm primarily interested in becoming a landlord and purchasing properties to rent.  I've been interested in doing real estate investing for quite some time now but money has always been a roadblock for me.  I've been doing research on creative ways to fund real estate projects, but many of the strategies I've found seem to be geared more toward investors who are looking to flip and make a profit in the short term. I've managed to save a bit but it's been a very slow process.

Does anyone know any strategies for funding a rental property other than trying to get a loan from a bank or is that something that hard money lenders tend to stay away from?

Thanks in advance!

@Jason Carr , the problem with hard money lenders is the interest rate is too high to be useful in buy and hold rentals, and they like to turn their money over quickly to make money from their points they charge over and above interest.  You either get owner financing, borrow money from relatives and friends, or raise money through public offerings, which is very complicated.  If you cannot do one of those it is bank financing.  I also recommend the books that @Jonathan Towell suggested.  Good luck.

You need to think of what assets you have and how you can leverage those assets for money to purchase a house.  Here are some off the top of my head (most I've learned from BP).

1. Cash - well, I figure if you had it, you wouldn't have written the post, but its always worth mentioning.

2. Cash in places that are tricky to tap - 401ks, IRAs, investment accounts, trusts, etc.  There is usually SOME way to tap the cash, but you may not qualify and/or like the fees associated with it.

3. Personal Property Assets you can tap - your primary residence, cars, boats, motor homes, etc.  If you own them free and clear you can get a loan on them to tap the cash.  Heck, for that matter, clean out your attic and see what you find to sell.  Or ask your relatives if you can clean out THEIR attics for free if you can keep their stuff and sell it.

4. Your own good credit - you can get a signature loan up to $35k at most banks, up to $100k at SoFi and a couple of other places.  Pay back is usually 7 years or less, so the payment may be high, but its a start.

5. Banks - they have lots of money, but will typically want you to put 20% down for a non-primary residence.  That said, have you considered house hacking?  There are a lot more avenues for loans if you live in the place you buy (duplex, triplex, etc.).

6. Your charm and winning smile - Who do you know that has one through four?  Ask them to partner up.

7. Your own initiative - If you're determined to 'save' your way to your first deal, what are you doing to earn extra income and/or reduce expenses?  Those topics have entire websites dedicated to them (try MrMoneyMustache.com and MadFientist.com), so I won't elaborate.  But its worth a mention.  Also, if you are in an expensive market, try investing elsewhere.  For instance, there's no way I could invest in Beverly Hills or New York, but I do okay in my own rural town. But there are plenty of other places you can get a good rental investment home for $50-$75k.

Good Luck! 

Originally posted by @Jonathan Towell :

To my shame, I have not read it, but @Brandon Turner has written a book on strategies for funding real estate investment:

http://get.biggerpockets.com/nomoneydown/

I read "Nothing Down for the 2000s: Dynamic New Wealth Strategies in Real Estate" by Robert Allen and would recommend it as well.

 Hey Jonathan. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm actually going to purchase that book today!

Originally posted by @Amy E. :

You need to think of what assets you have and how you can leverage those assets for money to purchase a house.  Here are some off the top of my head (most I've learned from BP).

1. Cash - well, I figure if you had it, you wouldn't have written the post, but its always worth mentioning.

2. Cash in places that are tricky to tap - 401ks, IRAs, investment accounts, trusts, etc.  There is usually SOME way to tap the cash, but you may not qualify and/or like the fees associated with it.

3. Personal Property Assets you can tap - your primary residence, cars, boats, motor homes, etc.  If you own them free and clear you can get a loan on them to tap the cash.  Heck, for that matter, clean out your attic and see what you find to sell.  Or ask your relatives if you can clean out THEIR attics for free if you can keep their stuff and sell it.

4. Your own good credit - you can get a signature loan up to $35k at most banks, up to $100k at SoFi and a couple of other places.  Pay back is usually 7 years or less, so the payment may be high, but its a start.

5. Banks - they have lots of money, but will typically want you to put 20% down for a non-primary residence.  That said, have you considered house hacking?  There are a lot more avenues for loans if you live in the place you buy (duplex, triplex, etc.).

6. Your charm and winning smile - Who do you know that has one through four?  Ask them to partner up.

7. Your own initiative - If you're determined to 'save' your way to your first deal, what are you doing to earn extra income and/or reduce expenses?  Those topics have entire websites dedicated to them (try MrMoneyMustache.com and MadFientist.com), so I won't elaborate.  But its worth a mention.  Also, if you are in an expensive market, try investing elsewhere.  For instance, there's no way I could invest in Beverly Hills or New York, but I do okay in my own rural town. But there are plenty of other places you can get a good rental investment home for $50-$75k.

Good Luck! 

 Hey Amy. Thanks a lot this post was actually very helpful!

Originally posted by @Jason Carr :
 Hey Amy. Thanks a lot this post was actually very helpful!

 No problem!  Drop us a line when you get your first deal.  I see so many posts like this, but rarely see the follow-up posts on what happened.

I was just asking myself this same exact question, thanks to all of you guys. 

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