Realty-Medics Property Management Company. Anyone?

15 Replies

Hi there,

Does anyone here know and have experience working with Realty Medics property management company? 

I would love to hear your experience and opinion about them.


Thanks in advance!

@Mark Vivanco for property management we off a tenant Benicia package that you don’t even pay for the tenant does it covers the owner in damage to the property, pet damage and many other things along with this in the package we drop ship air filters quarterly to educate tenants to take care of the your AC.

We also off protection plans for owner on rental protection which will cover if a tenant is not able to pay for rent and eviction protection plan which covers the physical cost of eviction!

The EPP (eviction protection plan) and RPP (rental protection plan) on cost just 24 dollars a month.

Though evictions are small percentage less than one percent.. it still can happen..

These are just some of the many things we can help you with!

Yes I am a current client of Realty Medics and am referring someone out-of-state to them too. I would start by saying no PM company is perfect, as my realtor told me. I have explored a couple other options in the area and found them to be professional and their fees perhaps slightly lower than others. They handle leasing and repairs fast and their repair pricing is fair. What I wish could be different, and understand this is difficult to do, is being able to advertise before tenants move out. They would only advertise after tenants moved out and the property cleaned and fixed, this usually results in at least a month of vacancy in between tenants. Would love to refer you. 

@Rongsu Qi - Thank you for your input. I have already met with them over Zoom. At this point, I'm trying to meet with other companies and hear investors' opinions about all the different companies.

If you've had good impressions from other companies, I'd love to hear those companies' names so I can research and contact them as well.

Thanks again.

If your property is in a good shape and desirable location it should not be taking 30 days or more to secure a renter. We Understand that vacancy is the biggest cost an owner has. Currently, we are right around 16-17 days average on renting properties, PROVIDED they are priced right and showed well. We do Have systems for pre-leasing properties prior to the old tenant move out where we stack inquiries so that once the unit is ready it can be shown Immediately. For sure 30 plus days is to long "Vacancies cost $$$$"

Originally posted by @William Rojas :

If your property is in a good shape and desirable location it should not be taking 30 days or more to secure a renter. We Understand that vacancy is the biggest cost an owner has. Currently, we are right around 16-17 days average on renting properties, PROVIDED they are priced right and showed well. We do Have systems for pre-leasing properties prior to the old tenant move out where we stack inquiries so that once the unit is ready it can be shown Immediately. For sure 30 plus days is to long "Vacancies cost $$$$"

Do you mean 16-17 days between tenants move out and tenants move in? Or 16-17 days between rent-ready and signing a lease? Usually tenants don't sign a lease to move in immediately, I would think a week or two between lease signing and moving in is normal.

 

@Rongsu Qi  

Better quality tenants will plan ahead. The ones who want to move in within 7 days tend to be the ones who are jumping from one place to another, skipping out or even being evicted. In our long experience those are the guys that can tend to be more irresponsible with not paying on time and/or damages. Its just the way it is.

Typically a good tenant will plan ahead and having given notice of at least 1 month to previous landlord will make arrangements to sign a lease 10 to 15 days or even more ahead of their expected occupancy date at the new place.

Our 16-17 days is from when the unit becomes “live” on market i.e move in ready. Since obviously if vendors, or repairs are taking time or are more extensive they may take longer than that to be completed. Thus “days on market” are when its truly available. So for example last week we rented one in Lake Nona in 10 days, as it was priced just right and was in great shape appearance wise.

Originally posted by @William Rojas :

@Rongsu Qi 

Better quality tenants will plan ahead. The ones who want to move in within 7 days tend to be the ones who are jumping from one place to another, skipping out or even being evicted. In our long experience those are the guys that can tend to be more irresponsible with not paying on time and/or damages. Its just the way it is.

Typically a good tenant will plan ahead and having given notice of at least 1 month to previous landlord will make arrangements to sign a lease 10 to 15 days or even more ahead of their expected occupancy date at the new place.

Our 16-17 days is from when the unit becomes “live” on market i.e move in ready. Since obviously if vendors, or repairs are taking time or are more extensive they may take longer than that to be completed. Thus “days on market” are when its truly available. So for example last week we rented one in Lake Nona in 10 days, as it was priced just right and was in great shape appearance wise.

This makes sense and is generally what I experience with the Realty Medics too. However this does mean actual vacancy (i.e. the days landlord not receiving rent) is going to be at least one month:  ~ 1 week of repairs and cleaning, ~ 2 weeks on the market, then between 1 and 2 weeks between lease signing and moving in. 

When I was a renter back in California, my landlord who self-manages, would market a month or two ahead of moving out, coordinate with old tenants to show, make repairs when tenant-occupied, then have new tenants move in as soon as the old tenants move out and the place is cleaned. She had the cleaner come in at 8 pm the day I moved out and the new tenants moved in the next day. This is truly zero vacancy.

Now I understand this is difficult to do and would require great tenants, great relationship with tenants and a very hot rental market. But I keep wondering, if she can make it happen, can someone else at least get close to that? 

@Rongsu Qi  Not necessarily so-- since if it’s a unit where we have ”pre leased” it, i.e we have been advertising “available from xx date” , it might be that we have applicants already pre-approved and ready to move in as soon as the turnaround repairs/cleaning is done. Thus they may take occupancy within a few days of it being cleaned etc.

The key is to not pre market the property too early, as that simply pisses renters off with the waiting and not being able to get in. Typically we will market a unit we know is coming vacant around 2 weeks ahead of time to stack the inquiries and pre approve them and do all the background verification. If the existing renters will give us time windows for showing that is even better. Thus when it truly is vacant and move in ready, we can move in the pre- qualified renters who can then get in the fastest, thus cutting the days vacant down. 

The idea of zero vacancy is pretty impractical in the real world of rentals, unless you have renewals. Since there is also the factor of utility turn on/off. There are repair vendors who get backed up, arrive late etc. So many variables adding other dynamics which might slow up the process. There are many moving parts which prevent the turnarounds being totally seem-less. The idea is to keep the current tenants happy with quality service, push for renewals and fighting for increases on your behalf.

Originally posted by @Noam Ofan :

Hi there,

Does anyone here know and have experience working with Realty Medics property management company? 

I would love to hear your experience and opinion about them.

Thanks in advance!

Following up on this post. Are you now working with Realty Medics or did you go another direction? Would love a recommendation for Central FL PM.