Cracked Slab-Opinions Needed

5 Replies

This is a house that has fix and flip potential but I'm wondering about this crack. The property is back on the market with a price reduction and rehab started.  It's about midway in the of the floor and runs across the entire basement and into the garage. It has a noticeable pitch and gives the impression that the front half of the house is sinking. There is some minor drywall cracks in the rooms above. It looks like someone did some leveling or patchwork in this pic, but I don't know how long ago that was.

I'd like to have some ammo when I talk to my  contractor. Any ideas on repairing it or other input is appreciated.

These can be precarious problems - eye sore for sure -- sometimes it's evident of settling.. and sometimes the house settles more and causes severe structural issues. I would be curious to find out what a foundation specialist would say about this particular problem.

Originally posted by @Jeff Valentino :

This is a house that has fix and flip potential but I'm wondering about this crack. The property is back on the market with a price reduction and rehab started.  It's about midway in the of the floor and runs across the entire basement and into the garage. It has a noticeable pitch and gives the impression that the front half of the house is sinking. There is some minor drywall cracks in the rooms above. It looks like someone did some leveling or patchwork in this pic, but I don't know how long ago that was.

I'd like to have some ammo when I talk to my  contractor. Any ideas on repairing it or other input is appreciated.

Cracks like that are typically indicative of settling or heaving of the soil under the slab, typically due to water. All fixes typically have to do with stopping the water and are extensive and expensive. $5000, $10,000, $15,000...

Minor cracks in the rooms above are a good thing if you are positive those same places haven't been repaired before. Drywall mud and paint can cover up a lot of previous damage that may return shortly. 

I'd be closely examining exterior walls for signs of cracks and interior walls for signs of repairs.

There are a couple of potential sources for this problem bit I would place my bet on poor compaction of the subsoil before the slab was poured. The second part of the problem is that there wasn't enough rebar in the slab and and probably a less than optimum mix of concrete. Basically, it's the result of a lot of cut corners. There are some good epoxies that can be used with rebar splines to keep things from separating further but the cracks are there to stay.

That's a very wide crack. Like @ mike Finley said, Are there any corresponding cracks in the exterior walls?

@Mike F.  the exterior is covered in siding do I can't tell if there are cracks. 

Thanks for the input so far all!

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