Pricing repair of a flooded crawlspace

10 Replies

I am looking into buying a house that has a flooded crawlspace. It is a good price, so I'm trying to find out how much it would cost to fix it. I have never done anything like it and I don't even know what trade to call. 

There is about 3 feet of water in the crawlspace. 

Anyone has dealt with that before?

Most "disaster" cleanup places are a good start. You may even have crawl space repair companies in your area. I would reach out to atleast 3 different companies and have them give an estimate. 

I run a disaster restoration company in Michigan. I'd be happy to work numbers up for you, would need pics and details. Of course you'd have to find a local contractor to do the work... slightly outside my service area.

Ok. I will get some photos. What details should I look for? 

- Dimensions of the crawl space (l/w/h)

- Floor and wall material (dirt, concrete, block, etc)

- source of water

- how long has it been wet (if you know)

- whether wood joists, insulation, other materials got wet

- presence of contents

- means of ingress: location, size, indoor/outdoor

- presence of mechanicals (furnace, water heater, etc)

Clearly you might not know all of this, but the more info you can provide the more accurate I can be.

@Jason Allen Taylor Is the restoration business good? What does it take to get in? What is the average claim size/days per job? Do you need a claims adjuster to give you jobs or do you do all marketing before you get a job? Do you need a claims specialist foreman for the estimate and scoping?

@Manolo D.

The business is good, just not as good as it looks from the other side of the fence. Average claim size varies by area, size of property, etc. I run a franchise company with hundreds of national contracts so the claim volume is probably different than you'd experience.

Insurance adjusters are great to build relationships with, so long as by "build relationships" they don't mean "give kickbacks to" or "slit your throat for". If you do good honest work and make them look good you'll get some that will trust and respect you.

Having an estimator experienced in insurance repairs is extremely important. Other things you need are a total willingness to subordinate everything that is important in your personal schedule, a strong desire to help others, the ability to wait a long time to get paid, and it helps to enjoy defending every decision you make and every line item you charge so that your bills don't get cut to shreds by the insurance company after the work is done. :)

I have to run right now, but I'm happy to discuss this further. It's honestly a good business if you do it right, and I'll be glad to share my experience. Send a message or some contact info if you'd like to chat about it.

@Jason Allen Taylor Give me a ring when you get a chance, I looked at your profile, and it is still empty. So my number is in my profile/signature below. I have talked with an estimating company that uses xactimate, i was searching for some small commercial renovation estimators but they came with a hefty fee that I am not interested in because of the nature of the business having a high failure bidding rate. But during the course, they have shown some samples that to me makes sense, it caught my interest and will probably be making a business plan when i get a chance. I have no problem with deligating the work to subordinates, I am used to just controlling the bigger picture, I have done research on various avenues in residential clients, so far development side is what interests me, then second is restoration.

Maybe we could work together, I have the crews to self perform they are available per job or per hour, maybe it is much cheaper for me to do a JV rather than me getting the franchise. I do not want somebody to teach me a table strategy and 50 ways I could run the franchise only to find out only 1 of the 50 works, I would prefer to be in business with somebody who knows the ins and outs of the business and know which method works than anybody else and someone to call for reference how to do this or that just in case an advice is needed, and not to some customer service that will give me the run around. In addition to the crew, I could get another engineer/architect for $10/hr who could be taught on estimating also.

Let's talk, I think we could form something, i have a GC license and all the insurance coverage to run the business, everything might be ready to go.

Thanks.

To begin with can't they put a pump in there to  pump out the water?  Why are they just letting the water sit there without at least getting rid of it?  Then don't they need to install a sump pump?

Try making lemonade.

Just market it as a shallow, access challenged pool.

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