Are the three day seminars worth it?

34 Replies

I recently attended a free two hour class, which I then signed up for a three day seminar, during the class (cost me $200). The seminar is to teach you about all the avenues of real estate. I signed up in hopes to get an in-depth crash course on how/where to start in a field which catches my interest. I'm a bit nervous they'll scratch the surface just a little deeper to make my $200 worth it, but ask for more money to give me an even more in-depth course at a later time.

Has anyone ever attended one of these seminars?

I don’t have any investments. Just getting started.

Any advice is welcome!!

Originally posted by @Joshua Thibeaux :

I recently attended a free two hour class, which I then signed up for a three day seminar, during the class (cost me $200). The seminar is to teach you about all the avenues of real estate. I signed up in hopes to get an in-depth crash course on how/where to start in a field which catches my interest. I’m a bit nervous they’ll scratch the surface just a little deeper to make my $200 worth it, but ask for more money to give me an even more in-depth course at a later time.

Has anyone ever attended one of these seminars?

I don’t have any investments. Just getting started.

Any advice is welcome!!

 My guess is you are right, they will just try to sign you up for another seminar.  Worst case, you go and find out you are right and you're only out $200.  

They will give you some important easy to understand information that is good to know.  Then they will dazzle you with 'ideas' without enough information to do anything with the ideas unless you sign up for a week long class, or some take them on your own on-line classes, or a mentor.  Then they will slowly suck every penny you have out of you.  Some even task you will calling all your credit cards and asking for a higher limit so you can pay them more money at your credit card interest rate.  Some even ask you to fill out a financial form so they know how much to bother you to suck you dry after the class is over with specials, until they have every penny and you have as much debt as you can get.

Just say no, do not fill out any financial forms.  They do not need to know your bank account balances, credit card information, etc.  JUST SAY NO!

Exactly, your guess is right. 
For curiosity, I Attended a free 2-hours class a while ago, same one like yours, then they ask all of us to sign up another $200 class. Half of the class did, but not me. I googled it, and found more information online. 
When you go to the $200 class, they will sell you a 3rd expensive class, no end.  If you have no money, they ask you to sign up many credit cards, and use up all the credit cards line to pay for their another expensive $30k course, and learn nothing.

To me, it is a scam.  Forget about it.  Don’t give them any money.  The class will make you very excited, and hard to refuse to sign up their class.  Don’t trust them.  Don’t listen to them sign up any new credit card and make yourself a lot of debt.  Don’t pay them even a penny.  They can’t really help you to be an investor.  They just want more and more money from you.  Don’t trust them.  Good luck to you. 

If the price is not to expensive it can be an encouragement. Probably need to pass on the upsale though. They usually have 20k mentor programs. 

These guys are in the business of selling dreams. They get people excited with passive income, cashflow, and getting rich quick but like others have said, they fall short on the specifics.

There are a lot of other legitimate educational opportunities out there that are taught by experienced investors. You'll find those offered by speakers at your local real estate investment clubs, where you might pay $20 to get in to the meeting. They'll give you some info and offer 2-7 day classes. Generally, prices range from $2000-$3000. I've found some of these courses to be well worth the money when you're just starting out. I would vet the instructor and the course before deciding to sign up and I would not pay more than $3k.

@Joshua Thibeaux , I agree with the sentiment of others on this thread that these courses can be long on marketing and short on value. I think you can access all of the information you need from this site as well as a number of excellent podcasts. Once you have educated yourself you should get out there and do a deal. This will give you more learning than any seminar or course. Good luck!

@Ronan Donnelly

I’m picking up on that through all of these responses. To tell you the truth, I was already thinking I would just take what I could from it and build off of that on my own research and rind networking opportunities around here. Thanks for all the help!

@Joshua Thibeaux that is how it works. The first one is free and it is just a pitch for the bigger seminar. Then they try to sell you on something bigger. It may be really big like a $50K coaching program. Other seminars are just a sales pitch to invest in the hosts fund. 

You would be better off buying a couple $20 books and spending a couple days reading them.

If you go make sure you make friends with the three attendees that are not completely new to the industry. 

Audible, $15.00 month(one free book per month) PB has some great books out.

Bigger Pockets, Free 

Podcast, Free

Mentors, Free

YouTube, Free 

Learning curve, Priceless 

Google, Free

There is way too much free info out there to be spending money(BP has free seminars all the time) on get rich quick seminars. This how I learned and it has worked very well. IMHO Finding the deal seems to be the toughest part of the game right now.

Best Regards

Robert

@Joshua Thibeaux agree with other posts here, you’ll get up sold for sure... and from what I’ve heard then they’ll pitch you on some crazy coaching program for 30k or something nuts...

@Joshua Thibeaux when I look back on the beginning of REI, I knew it was important to get around people in the business and asset class you want to be in.

Find a way to add real value to another investor, property manager, syndicate, etc...

I have found a love of reading like I have never had before. Attend meet-ups and other free events if you are concerned with the money.

If you are willing to do ethically what others aren't willing to do, you will gain traction. If you take shortcuts and make excuses, that $200 will be a drop in the bucket compared to the losses you will suffer.

What are you willing to do to make it real?

Merry Christmas!

My friend signed up for one and they let him bring a guest so he invited me to come along. I informed my friend that they will probably try to upsell us to a more expensive package. It's next weekend, I'll let you know if it's worth next week.

I attended a seminar maybe 7 years ago. I left with a burning desire to have sandwich leases within mobile home parks and/or wholesale properties. Spent 2k on that.

Then I started trying to act on that. Immediately ran into massive roadblocks and began to research wholesaling laws. Stopped dead in my tracks with that plan.

Spent the next 7 years getting my financial house in order, established some savings, invested 15% into the markets.

THEN I bought an investment property.

I think it was only worth it in the sense that it grew my awareness of REI in general, I learned more from reading, networking, and doing.

If there was a seminar near me for $200, I'd do it.

@Joshua Thibeaux

I recently went to one of these $200 3-day conferences. For $200 it wasn’t a total waste of time. I did learn a few things, got some gears turning but ultimately it is up to me to make things happened. Gained some connections.

About 50% of the time was spent “soft selling” their $25k mastermind group. It was largely done through current members presenting their (best) deals and talking about how they couldn’t have done it without the mastermind.

For someone who is pretty skeptical it was easy to spot the “sales” plugs and easy to say no.

@Joshua Thibeaux

My experience that I was lead into was I went to the free one day, paid for the 3 day and then spent 10's of thousands for the mentor and classes around the country. I got things out of it and even took some action but the luster eventually wore off. 1 year later, I discovered bigger pockets, read several of the bigger pockets authors books and can say for me, that this has been worth much more than all I did previously. and am taking action today. My 2 cents

@Joshua Thibeaux Several people have mentioned this and I will emphasize it. The best value you will recognize from this event is the opportunity to network. Meet as many people as you can and try to find a few will similar goals. If you can find someone that already has some experience in what you want to do then you probably got more than your money’s worth out of the event. Good luck!

@Joshua Thibeaux we see these all the time in the greater Boston area. They’re great if you’re a new and just looking for a knowledge dump or if you don’t have a strategy and can just go in and execute exactly how they teach.

We, as an agents specializing in investment properties, always see and influx of "investors looking to invest with other peoples money" when a certain guru comes to town. For most people they try it for a month the bail on the program. But I have seen other people take the strategy and execute on it very successfully. If you need a kick in the pants to get going these seminars can be good. But That being said all the information they offer to you is available for free online or by talking to a knowledgeable agent or broker in your market.

@Joshua Thibeaux Great info here already. This seminar is going to be a pitch for their $30k program. These guys are indeed in the business of selling dreams. However, for $200, your bigger loss here is the loss of your time unless you get information or a network out of the event.

Find a REIA or real estate networking group local to you and make a habit of going to it every month. Meet experienced investors there and take them out for coffee. Not all of them will accept, but many will. You can get more out of a 1 hour conversation with a multimillionaire for the price of a $3 coffee than you can out of some of these weekend events.

All that said, you already paid for the thing. Go to it, but do not pay for any additional programs until you've absolutely picked a strategy to single-mindedly pursue.

@Joshua Thibeaux

It will be another upsale, they will feed you bits of incomplete info and lure you to pay the outrageous price.

However I learned about a magical place called bigger pockets from another attendee at the last one I attended (will ever attend).

I’d say it’s worth it with the right expectations, otherwise I’d say you can spend three days better listening to bp podcasts and networking here. Analyze deals on the calcs etc.