Real Estate Agent working towards rentals

4 Replies | Houston, Texas

Hey Biggerpockets guys and gals! I've been watching some of the podcasts videos on YouTube for a little bit now ,and am interested in taking the leap towards getting my first rental, but feel like I still could use some extra guidance in order to actually pull the trigger. All comments/criticism are greatly appreciated! I'd love to network with others for those that want to grab coffee or something to discuss more. 

Thanks,


So I would say if you are looking at off market deals and are going direct to the seller (not a wholesaler) to make sure that if you end up representing yourself during said transaction that you disclose to them all of their options. The last thing you want is an issue with the city, county and/or state because you didn't tell them that if they list with you instead of selling directly to you that they could potentially get a better deal. 

Besides that I think that depending on how long you have been in the business and how many deals you have done your best start could be to reach out to your past clients. One of my first deals was a past client that fell on hard times and was moving out of state and just wanted to get things over with as fast as possible so they could move on and start fresh. 

Originally posted by @Bryan Goswick :

Hey Biggerpockets guys and gals! I've been watching some of the podcasts videos on YouTube for a little bit now ,and am interested in taking the leap towards getting my first rental, but feel like I still could use some extra guidance in order to actually pull the trigger. All comments/criticism are greatly appreciated! I'd love to network with others for those that want to grab coffee or something to discuss more. 

Thanks,








  • I like to give new investors the following punch list. I typically work with a lot of out of state folks, but it should be fairly applicable for those investing at home as well.

  • Don't buy in the roughest neighborhood in the urban core. Pick a solid B-Class suburban area. Perhaps a nice 1950's built bungalow.
  • Always hire a 3rd party property inspector to give you an unbiased feel for the home. The reports are 40-90 pages long and go through the entire house in great detail.
  • Get an appraisal. If your using financing the bank requires this. This is good. The bank isn't going to let you blow their money. They have more skin in the game then you do.
  • Make sure you get clear title. If using a lender this is a non issue. They will make you do this. It's those maniacs that buy homes cash via quit claim deed off of craigslist that really get screwed.
  • Make sure your property manager is a licensed real estate brokerage.
  • Google Clayton Morris and/or Morris Invest for a cautionary tale of what not to do when buying turnkey real estate
  • Understand you can not eliminate all risk, only mitigate it. If you are risk adverse real estate, (especially out of state) is not for you.