Looking for Staging in the Baltimore area

19 Replies

So my first flip is coming along and looking to list in a few days. Does anyone know of any reasonable staging companies that service the Glen Burnie area? ARV is 210k-220k should I even bother to stage?

Damien

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Originally posted by @Scott K. :
I would not stage a 200k house, I look at as many properties as I can and hardly ever see them staged

In that case, staging will certainly allow the OP's house to stand out among the competition...

Originally posted by @J Scott:
Originally posted by @Scott K.:
I would not stage a 200k house, I look at as many properties as I can and hardly ever see them staged

In that case, staging will certainly allow the OP's house to stand out among the competition...

that's true. Its just not very popular here in Michigan. Agents don't even suggest doing it in lower cost housing.

I found someone to stage the house for $1,200 I'm thinking it will help the house sell faster and may even increase the offers slightly. I'm leaning towards doing it..

@Damien Clark

I have business meetings (support) with a realtor in Howard County. He does listing primarily and he stages every single house. According to him, it not only helps sell faster, but many of the times they get full offer for his clients. He is going to pass the stager's information along to me. If you have not decided to utilize who you found by the time I get the information, I will pass it along to you.

Save your money. Staging helps but how much really? What your attempting to do is convince someone spending 220 to buy yours over another. I feel staging is an expense better saved for ridiculous houses that require vision to know what a room can become. A 220 in glen burnie, more than likely, isn't one of those houses though a staging company would attempt to convince you otherwise. Look at your comps and see what they've done, call them even.

Account Closed my concern is this house does not have much going for it. It's a small 3 bedroom 1 bath home just over 1k sq feet. We did as much as we could to the kitchen and bathroom, granite, tile etc but other than that the house does not have much in general to offer. I'm hoping the the staging will mask this a little. If it sells just a month faster it pays for itself.

You have me second guessing my decision though...

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Originally posted by Account Closed:
Save your money. Staging helps but how much really? What your attempting to do is convince someone spending 220 to buy yours over another. I feel staging is an expense better saved for ridiculous houses that require vision to know what a room can become. A 220 in glen burnie, more than likely, isn't one of those houses though a staging company would attempt to convince you otherwise. Look at your comps and see what they've done, call them even.

Personally, I disagree with this. We've staged every house we've ever sold, including many in the $90-100K price range. The feedback we get is consistently along the lines of, "Wow, this house looks amazing...my client fell in love with it the minute she walked in the door."

While I'd like to say that the renovation gets the credit for those types of comments, the renovation makes the house look like every other rehabbed house in the neighborhood, which presumably these buyers have looked at as well -- but they didn't seem to fall in love with those houses.

My take on this is two-fold:

1. Buyers have no vision and by staging, you're defining the spaces for them so they can better understand the flow of the house and how it *could* look when they move in;

2. A furnished house creates a more emotional connection with buyers, as compared to an empty house, which just feels unwelcoming.

While I've never done any split-testing to compare staging vs not staging, our average DOM is less than 2 weeks and our average sale:list price ratio is 96%+. So, something is working, and in my opinion, the staging has more to do with it than anything else.

Just my $.02...

Originally posted by @J Scott:
Originally posted by Account Closed:
Save your money. Staging helps but how much really? What your attempting to do is convince someone spending 220 to buy yours over another. I feel staging is an expense better saved for ridiculous houses that require vision to know what a room can become. A 220 in glen burnie, more than likely, isn't one of those houses though a staging company would attempt to convince you otherwise. Look at your comps and see what they've done, call them even.

Personally, I disagree with this. We've staged every house we've ever sold, including many in the $90-100K price range. The feedback we get is consistently along the lines of, "Wow, this house looks amazing...my client fell in love with it the minute she walked in the door."

While I'd like to say that the renovation gets the credit for those types of comments, the renovation makes the house look like every other rehabbed house in the neighborhood, which presumably these buyers have looked at as well -- but they didn't seem to fall in love with those houses.

My take on this is two-fold:

1. Buyers have no vision and by staging, you're defining the spaces for them so they can better understand the flow of the house and how it *could* look when they move in;

2. A furnished house creates a more emotional connection with buyers, as compared to an empty house, which just feels unwelcoming.

While I've never done any split-testing to compare staging vs not staging, our average DOM is less than 2 weeks and our average sale:list price ratio is 96%+. So, something is working, and in my opinion, the staging has more to do with it than anything else.

Just my $.02...

Hey J. Do you really believe your competition in the $125-175K range in Atlanta was doing the same thorough and excellent rehabs you were doing? Be honest. All the competition was doing all new surfaces and fixtures, interior and exterior?

I know you believe staging to matter, and I think it helped in some of your WI houses, especially ones with more challenging spaces. But since you didn't compare selling with and without staging in ATL, it really is an unknown. The staging contributed to branding and reputation for sure. IMO you may have overestimated your competition, and not taken into consideration the entire market picture given what you were offering.

No one stages where I am. Hardly anything sits on the market very long. I could stage a property, but since the last two got full price and over asking without staging, I'm not changing the formula until it stops working.

@Damien Clark

Go with your gut. You have some that will say stage and others that say do not. For those who use staging consistently it works for them. So it could work for you. Do a split test and see. Stage this one and the next that is similar do not stage it.

Also, if you budget it staging into your initial costs, then you will not be losing money. So there more than one way to look at it. Everyone I know who stages sales fast and gets near asking if not asking and some. Both for rehabs and new construction.

Stagers would not have a career if it was totally useless. Somebody thinks its worth it.

keep in mind, you can always stage it later if not staging it isnt proving effective. I wouldn't stage the house unless the costs were nominal, relatively speaking....at least initially.

Just wanted to update everyone.. I did decide to stage the home. We listed the home for 224900 and it sold in 8 days. We got 1k over asking and no closing cost help. I don't know what we would have got if we did not stage but my gut is telling me we would not have got as good of a offer.