Scripts for incoming calls

13 Replies

Does anyone have advice or somewhere they can point me to good scripts for incoming calls from direct mail to qualify a seller? Would greatly appreciate it! Thanks ahead of time.

Hello, if you look under tools and file place you will see Brandon posted a sample of his script that you can adjust to your situation and it’s a pretty good template to get the information you need from a potential seller.

Good luck!
Josh

Following let me know what you find out.

I will check that out thanks.

Keep in mind that scripts are great as a tool.  However, the seller rarely follows the script.  You will be flexible.  Focus on the important stuff:  what is the condition of the property, why are they selling etc.

Just have a conversation with the seller.  

@Roland Paicely I agree, as I have worked in multiple sales jobs and in multiple call centers scripts are just a guideline to ensure you structure and keep control of the conversation. Very rarely will you actually read from it or even want to, but instead use it to keep your conversation consistent and streamlined. The best sellers in every industry I have been in always have used scripts at least until they have their roadmap for the call memorized.

@Anthony Greco I have had great success chatting with the seller like an old friend. I ask general questions about the property that I need to know first hand, as well as asking why they are selling. But if you want to close more of your call backs just treat the lead like a human and don't rely so much on a script. 

If the seller brings up something about her dog.. ask questions about the dog and talk about your dog. If the seller talks about her dad's 1970 Corvette..  talk about the Corvette. Because when you do that and connect with a seller, she'll turn down 3 other higher offers and take yours because you took a few extra minutes to get to know her and her Cocker Spaniel named Charlie. And for extra brownie points keep a jar of milk-bones in your car for when you go walk the property..

Yes I am speaking from personal experience if you were wondering haha!

Invest a few more minutes in a conversation and it will pay dividends in the future, because most people don't take the time to connect with a seller, you'll stand out from anyone else he or she has talked to about the property and they will literally WANT to sell to you.

Happy hunting!

Checkout @Jerry Puckett and his blogs on BP.  He is handling my first direct mail campaign.  Here's his script that I'll be using.

https://www.biggerpockets.com/blogs/1378/28030-youve-done-your-marketing-the-phone-is-ringingnow-what

Originally posted by @Nicholas Armstrong :

@Anthony Greco I have had great success chatting with the seller like an old friend. I ask general questions about the property that I need to know first hand, as well as asking why they are selling. But if you want to close more of your call backs just treat the lead like a human and don't rely so much on a script. 

If the seller brings up something about her dog.. ask questions about the dog and talk about your dog. If the seller talks about her dad's 1970 Corvette..  talk about the Corvette. Because when you do that and connect with a seller, she'll turn down 3 other higher offers and take yours because you took a few extra minutes to get to know her and her Cocker Spaniel named Charlie. And for extra brownie points keep a jar of milk-bones in your car for when you go walk the property..

Yes I am speaking from personal experience if you were wondering haha!

Invest a few more minutes in a conversation and it will pay dividends in the future, because most people don't take the time to connect with a seller, you'll stand out from anyone else he or she has talked to about the property and they will literally WANT to sell to you.

Happy hunting!

 @Nicholas Armstrong 

Completely agree!

@Anthony Greco

The most important question of all that needs to be answered is why. Why are they selling? You aren't buying a house here, you're solving a problem that the house is causing for the homeowner. Be a problem solver, not a house buyer. 

People don't just sell houses for the heck of it; there's a reason for doing so. If you can uncover that reason and incorporate it into your offer, you're showing them far more value than just your offer price. That can help neutralize the issue of price because they can see they're getting so much more out of the deal than just the dollars you're handing them for the house. 

Once you have them on the phone, you can ask them to describe their house to stimulate conversation. Stick to open-ended questions: "tell me about your house", "what upgrades have you done?", "what repairs have you done?", "what repairs or upgrades need to be done?", "what do you think the home is worth? why?", etc. Most people are more than willing to talk about their house and it helps break the ice and gives you important information about the house.

Once you've built some rapport, start probing about why they're selling. You could use transitions like "Wow, it sounds like you have a great house, why are you selling?" Or, "It sounds like you really enjoy living on that street, why are you moving?". Then follow up with things "what are your plans after you move?" or "where are you moving to?" or "what will it mean for you to finally get this house sold?" to dig a little deeper. 

When you formulate your offer, make sure it focuses on solving their problem (again, the problem is not selling a house). Your offer shouldn't be: "Mr. Homeowner, we're going to offer $xxx,xxx.xx for your house. How does that sound?" 

It should be: "Mr. Homeowner, I know you enjoy your home, but it's become a big financial headache because of the work that it needs. I know you feel financially limited and it's stressing you out because the AC is broken and you don't have $6,000 to fix it. Even worse, the roof is leaking and insurance won't cover the damage, so you're facing another $10,000 in repairs for that. You've been stressing and losing sleep over how you're going to come up with the money to fix this while your house falls apart around you. How awesome would it be to lift that stress off your shoulders and free you of this financial headache? I can have a check to you for $xxx,xxx.xx  in x days and you can put this mess behind you for good. How would that feel for you?"

To do the latter, you need to have a rapport with the homeowner. You need to be conversational, you need to care about them, and you need to develop some trust before you can start digging into the why. Just be a nice person and take a genuine interest in what the homeowner needs out of this, not you. Again, you're not there to buy a house; you're there to solve a problem that the house is causing. 

Be a problem solver as opposed to a house buyer and you'll likely be much more successful. 

Happy investing! :)

Thanks for the replies! @Nicholas Armstrong I couldn't agree more as this type of rapport building is what led me to be very successful in my sales type jobs throughout college ultimately leading me to management positions. I would say my purposes for a script are not so much on what to say to a seller but what questions to ask that will qualify the seller. I have always approached any type of sales position with the goal of becoming ones friend and advisor to genuinely help the client on their pain points and solve their problems.

Due to my lack of personal experience right now asking questions like "are you aware if the title has a lien on it" etc are not natural to me yet and I need to form some type of structure at first to ensure that I do not go through a call thinking everything is great and I have touched all the points only to hang up and realize I didn't ask them how much in repairs they think the place needs, or how old the furnace is etc.

@Mark F. those are some good questions! Thanks for those I will add them to my list.

I don't know if I am overcomplicating things but some of the main points to touch on a call I have are:

Do you have a house for sale?

What is it worth?

What are the repairs necessary and condition of the home?

What do you owe?

What would you hope to get for it?

Are there any liens on the title that you may be aware of?

I will definitely be adding some of the mentioned questions from Mark to my arsenal.

@Anthony Greco Great to hear you have sales experience! That will definitely be an asset. I've done sales for 11 years now and have found that building rapport and trust and getting to the "why" are absolutely essential. Have a great rest of your day!

I would use your initial call to get to know the person that you're trying to buy the home from. You don't want to run them through a 30 question barrage. Think of it kind of like dating. You're not going to propose on your first date. Work on establishing if they have equity and motivation. If they do set up a  time to meet with them. You make your money in the follow ups, networking, and face to face. If you just wait for the "I'm desperate please take my house from me for 60 cents on the dollar" lead you're going to miss out on TONS of opportunity.

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