TRACKING absentee owners down and DOOR KNOCKING

8 Replies

Good Morning,

I wanted to know this question for a long time now. I know most people that get into wholesaling send out yellow letters or postcards to absentee owners in hoping to get a call back.  My question is:

If the absentee owner is local and I located their  "CURRENT ADDRESS" using the  county's property appraisal  information. Can I go to the current address and door knock to speak with them in person about the vacant house??

It is legal??

Not illegal, but not a good idea, in my opinion.

I've seen over the years, quite a few vacant homes, with owners apparently at the address, but yet not so. A few in my neighborhood are in nursing homes, and the disposition of their homes are in question.

I never thought much of it till my mother in law, who's 93 fell down in June. She cracked a vertebrate in her back and have yet to walk normally. She's staying with us till she get's better, if ever. My honest opinion, she won't get any better.

She kept asking when she can go home, and we keep telling her "soon". She lives alone, her home is paid for and my wife goes there twice a month to pick up the mail and clean up, spending a day there. My wife and her siblings discussed it, and currently her retirement income comfortably pays the taxes and utilities. It's true, if she continues to stay with us, dump the place, she'll save a ton of money on the taxes and other expenses.

But there's one issue that is up in the air. If we give her the truth, and say "mom, you could save a lot of money getting rid of the place particularly with all these investors knocking on your door". And I know her answer would be "I'm not dead yet".

I'm retired too, and run down to the local coffee shop several times a week. I met another retiree and explained to him I have a paid up home and some paid up rentals. He said he know quite a few relatives in the same boat and their children couldn't wait for them to die, and some say that out loud to their faces. Says he found it quite annoying.

To be honest with you, if an investor I don't know knock on her door while my wife is there, she either won't answer the door, or get very annoyed if they're insistent. Currently the priority is to let mom relax, get well, tell her that her home is well taken care off, and don't worry about a thing. Doing a deal with an investor is the last thing that mom wants.

Originally posted by @Frank Chin :

Not illegal, but not a good idea, in my opinion.

I've seen over the years, quite a few vacant homes, with owners apparently at the address, but yet not so. A few in my neighborhood are in nursing homes, and the disposition of their homes are in question.

I never thought much of it till my mother in law, who's 93 fell down in June. She cracked a vertebrate in her back and have yet to walk normally. She's staying with us till she get's better, if ever. My honest opinion, she won't get any better.

She kept asking when she can go home, and we keep telling her "soon". She lives alone, her home is paid for and my wife goes there twice a month to pick up the mail and clean up, spending a day there. My wife and her siblings discussed it, and currently her retirement income comfortably pays the taxes and utilities. It's true, if she continues to stay with us, dump the place, she'll save a ton of money on the taxes and other expenses.

But there's one issue that is up in the air. If we give her the truth, and say "mom, you could save a lot of money getting rid of the place particularly with all these investors knocking on your door". And I know her answer would be "I'm not dead yet".

I'm retired too, and run down to the local coffee shop several times a week. I met another retiree and explained to him I have a paid up home and some paid up rentals. He said he know quite a few relatives in the same boat and their children couldn't wait for them to die, and some say that out loud to their faces. Says he found it quite annoying.

To be honest with you, if an investor I don't know knock on her door while my wife is there, she either won't answer the door, or get very annoyed if they're insistent. Currently the priority is to let mom relax, get well, tell her that her home is well taken care off, and don't worry about a thing. Doing a deal with an investor is the last thing that mom wants.

 And then there is the tax issue. You would want to run the capital gains taxes of selling now versus inheritance taxes in your state for your particular situation. It could end up costing more than you think to sell rather than wait. I'd use a inheritance lawyer to run the numbers.

use the broward and mdc appraisal door knock the neighbors

Where in America is it illegal to knock on somebody's door?

Originally posted by @Mark Thomas :

Where in America is it illegal to knock on somebody's door?

 Not illegal, definitely a bit annoying. Only people that come to people's doors directly anymore seem to be police, people trying to sell you something you don't want or need, or people wanting to preach to you.  If I peek out the window and you aren't the police (god forbid!), then I likely won't be answering the door because there is a very high likelihood you are one of the other two.

I feel like someone coming to my door as a property investor would turn me off to them because they are probably catching me in the middle of something (even if I'm just relaxing and reading a book) and wanting to talk to me NOW about this.  It isn't like them sending me a mailer and me being able to get back in touch with them when I have time IF I am even interested. Also, people feel very pressured with the coming-to-your-door tactic in general, I think.  It is very in your face.

 I feel like people will be much more receptive the more we keep things on their terms.

Originally posted by @Mark Thomas :

Where in America is it illegal to knock on somebody's door?

 There are laws regulating "door to door solicitation" and I doubt many go around door knocking are even aware of. For New York State see: Solicitation

Actual ordinances is on the county and city levels, see: Local solicitation

To conform to these laws, persons soliciting must register, wear a certain photo id, and solicit during certain hours, check non solicitation registries. How many door knocking investors do this? Here in NYC, property owners can put up "No solicitation" signs and it must be honored.

But when I started real estate investing, partnered with an agent where the real estate broker required his agents to go around door knocking. He did it for a year and got no deals out of it.

So when you go around ringing doorbells, knocking on doors, be aware of these regulations.

i honestly wouldnt be to worried in regards to the door to door laws, especially if your knocking a single door rather than canvassing. Im new to wholesaling, but currently i run a door to door team for ADT home security, and all we do is knock DOORS. Rarely do we ever have any encounters with the law, and at the WORST if pulled over by the law enforcement they will tell you to just leave the area, but keep in mind this is after canvassing an area for hours at a time. -Just my two cents. 

Originally posted by @Jonathan Messri :

i honestly wouldnt be to worried in regards to the door to door laws, especially if your knocking a single door rather than canvassing. Im new to wholesaling, but currently i run a door to door team for ADT home security, and all we do is knock DOORS. Rarely do we ever have any encounters with the law, and at the WORST if pulled over by the law enforcement they will tell you to just leave the area, but keep in mind this is after canvassing an area for hours at a time. -Just my two cents. 

 You are right. Solicitors ring my doorbell several times a month, so I doubt they worry much about door to door solicitation laws. It's a nuisance so I don't bother with my doorbells unless someone calls ahead first. Too bad.

Same with bandit signs. They have laws against them too, yet they are all over. Guess no one worries much about it either, or they say it's only several around the neighborhood, or we'll take it down when law enforcement tells us.

I answered the earlier post where someone asked where door knocking is illegal. Seems it's illegal in a lot of places where you don't follow the rules. Whether you get into trouble for it is another issue.

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