Quit My Job and Plan to Wholesale

530 Replies

@Melanie Hartmann  

Go for it! 

Do consider some of the advice such as getting your license and working the real estate agent business alongside the investor/wholesale side. 

I don't have enough people fuel to focus on being an agent. But, we still convert a lot of our marketing dollars into referral fees (I'm a licensed agent so I can refer leads out and if the other agent lists them they give me a % of their commission). 

I think most people even the "naysayers" mean well. The delivery may just not be that great... 

Take massive action and succeed!

@Melanie Hartmann   If you don't take the chance, you will never have known the outcome whether it be failure or success . If you don't try you will always have that lingering what if question. I walked away from a full time job about 4 years ago to start my own business. Has it been a gravy train the whole time ? absolutely not.  Every day is a challenge to get a better service out there than my competitors. Congrats on your move, life is short to not take chances at something you're passionate about. Don't get discouraged and keep moving forward. I wish you all the best.

I took a peek at your website.  Looks very nice!  

One thing I noticed is that it states in the FAQ section that house prices have taken a huge hit in the past 5 years. Was that intentional? 

This post has been removed.

Originally posted by @Tony Kim :

I took a peek at your website.  Looks very nice!  

One thing I noticed is that it states in the FAQ section that house prices have taken a huge hit in the past 5 years. Was that intentional? 

Thank you Tony! It's all in "work in progress" state at the moment - most of what you see is the text/template/content that came from the site I'm using. I plan to have my online presence personalized and finalized within the next two weeks (still waiting on my LLC to be filed). Then I will market like crazy!

Originally posted by @Melissa Barnard :

@Melanie Hartmann This is amazing! It hits close to home for me because I did the exact same thing a couple weeks ago. I wish you the best and hope to be able to follow your journey! :)

 Absolutely! I'll be starting a blog soon and am thinking of outlining my progress on that. 

Let me know how things go for you Melissa! Maybe we can exchange notes! @Jerryll Noorden - check out his profile and blog for some really great tips!

Originally posted by @Matt K. :
Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann:
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Terrell Williams:
@Mercedez H. From what I've heard about wholesaling...it can be very lucrative

 out of curiosity where'd you hear this... from what I've heard it's the exact opposite with a few exceptions.

 There's a "right" and a "wrong" way to do anything. I'm doing this the "wrong" way according to the masses. Good, because if the masses were doing this, it would truly be a waste of my time. I will fail and go back to a W-2 job with my "tail" between my legs. Right? I mean that's what the statistics say. Statistics have never bothered me. In fact, I rather love statistics (to a point, then it's just too complicated for my little brain). Statistics are a number and they mean very little. They are just "odds" and a tweak here or there and the very same numbers will give you very different results. In grad school, one of my professors was teaching us a 'NEW' way to analyze the effectiveness of an intervention. We used 2-3 different ways of analyzing said numbers, they all gave us a different answer and he, our professor, and the rest of the class - we couldn't make sense of it because it didn't make any damn sense. Also, you can manipulate charts and graphs to "show" anything you like because they are visual and we are merely human. It's really funny actually.

Opening your own business can be lucrative in general, but most burn straight to the ground. Some recover, case in point "Lego," check out their history. They almost completely died out, now it's EVERYWHERE. I'm just saying, statistics don't mean anything to the one person who makes it. You just got to find a way to make it work, until it REALLY DOESN'T, then go on to something else or try a different strategy. Being open and always learning and adapting are key here. The original owners of McDonald's were not willing to adapt and they were bought out and well, they missed out on what McDonald's has become because they didn't want to change and grow with the guy who ultimately bought them out.

Just as a side note... these "scores" for the Top Contributors on the right-hand side. Jay Hinrichs score is 8.58. My score has been going up and up and up. It's now at 7.72. It's basically saying I'm almost as good as Jay? I don't know what they hey that "score" means or is. It is meaningless. Jay and I are no where near on the same level of pretty much anything. You wouldn't know that just by looking at the scores though, now would you? 

 I don't think anyone is saying you're doing "it" the wrong way, if by "it" you mean pursuing an alternative career. I think the point that's trying to get pushed across is why wholesale? There's plenty of ways to make money in Real Estate and there's plenty examples of high performers doing just the role they chose..... 


But again it falls back to why wholesale and not one of the the other ways that typically better returns on time/money spent... 

And to clarify it's not that you can't or won't be successful, it's that you seem to have resources that would allow you to tackle something with a higher barrier of entry than wholesaling (which traditionally people use as a stepping stone vs focusing on just that).  Also to add, we know you needed a job change so it isn't about that either, it's soley about how'd you come to setting your sights only on wholesale vs (insert million and one ways to make money in real estate).

I've (rather unsuccessfully) tried the other routes part-time for close to a year now. I figure wholesaling will be a much faster way to make money (while allowing me to work for myself). I have had a whole lot of NOTHING with my other REI attempts aside from wasted time and money. I can't find good enough deals going the traditional routes. Done right, I figure wholesaling will help me build up a significant amount of cash (over time), blow open my network, get me out of my comfort zone/build confidence and RE knowledge faster than "traditional" routes, and give me access to some really great deals for my own personal portfolio when the time is right! I was really AGAINST wholesaling initially. Thinking it was sleazy, illegal, and not worthwhile. The other ways have been too slow for me and we've had some expenses that ate into the savings I built up, limiting the types of decent properties I could buy to... basically nothing. Even if buying an investment property, I'd be able to buy one, for $200-$400 in cash flow IF LUCKY. Not enough to leave my job any time soon. Then I'd have to work several more years to build up another deposit again. Also, I did not have enough capital/knowledge to get into rehabbing without taking a significant risk to my family. So I began researching wholesaling, and well, this route seemed to be the most feasible with the least amount of risk and biggest turnout for my personal situation. It's not for everyone. It is a LOT of work. However, for me and my situation, it will work. Still not sure if/when we will be moving out of state so once that is finalized, I may look into obtaining my real estate license in that state.

Originally posted by @Account Closed :
Originally posted by @Tony Kim:

I took a peek at your website.  Looks very nice!  

One thing I noticed is that it states in the FAQ section that house prices have taken a huge hit in the past 5 years. Was that intentional? 

 Whats the link?  

 The links are functioning but the sites are in progress (hence the generic text that Tony mentioned).  One of my seller sites and my one investor site can be found on my BP profile. :) I plan to have my online presence scrubbed and fully personalized within the next two weeks and then I will begin my marketing campaigns.

This post has been removed.

Originally posted by @Account Closed :

I have had a whole lot of NOTHING with my other REI attempts aside from wasted time and money. I can't find good enough deals going the traditional routes. Done right, I figure wholesaling will help me build up a significant amount of cash (over time), blow open my network, get me out of my comfort zone/build confidence and RE knowledge faster than "traditional" routes, and give me access to some really great deals for my own personal portfolio when the time is right! I was really AGAINST wholesaling initially. Thinking it was sleazy, illegal, and not worthwhile. The other ways have been too slow for me and we've had some expenses that ate into the savings I built up, limiting the types of decent properties I could buy to... basically nothing

Melanie

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Everything in Real Estate is traditional.  It doesnt sound like youve got a game changer.   For you to succeed you have to be better than Jerryll Noodle.

I wish you well.   But your above writings proves youve got urealistic expectations.  Me and my buddies are not PROS.   We not adding or looking to add-  its not 2012-2013.   Prices now are outrageous.   Look at the numbers.

One guy snagged a $90,000 rental now worth maybe $400,000.   The rents at the time were great.  At $400,000 the rents now look silly.

Your exact comments are exactly why I didn't feel like explaining WHY I chose wholesaling. "Your above writing proves you've got unrealistic expectations." Based on what exactly? I don't need to explain myself but did... just for people to continue to poke holes and try to beat me down... what benefit is that for anyone? Honestly? It's all a waste of both of our times.

The people who have done it and are doing it GET IT. Those who aren't, well they don't. End of story...

Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann :
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann:
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Terrell Williams:
@Mercedez H. From what I've heard about wholesaling...it can be very lucrative

 out of curiosity where'd you hear this... from what I've heard it's the exact opposite with a few exceptions.

 There's a "right" and a "wrong" way to do anything. I'm doing this the "wrong" way according to the masses. Good, because if the masses were doing this, it would truly be a waste of my time. I will fail and go back to a W-2 job with my "tail" between my legs. Right? I mean that's what the statistics say. Statistics have never bothered me. In fact, I rather love statistics (to a point, then it's just too complicated for my little brain). Statistics are a number and they mean very little. They are just "odds" and a tweak here or there and the very same numbers will give you very different results. In grad school, one of my professors was teaching us a 'NEW' way to analyze the effectiveness of an intervention. We used 2-3 different ways of analyzing said numbers, they all gave us a different answer and he, our professor, and the rest of the class - we couldn't make sense of it because it didn't make any damn sense. Also, you can manipulate charts and graphs to "show" anything you like because they are visual and we are merely human. It's really funny actually.

Opening your own business can be lucrative in general, but most burn straight to the ground. Some recover, case in point "Lego," check out their history. They almost completely died out, now it's EVERYWHERE. I'm just saying, statistics don't mean anything to the one person who makes it. You just got to find a way to make it work, until it REALLY DOESN'T, then go on to something else or try a different strategy. Being open and always learning and adapting are key here. The original owners of McDonald's were not willing to adapt and they were bought out and well, they missed out on what McDonald's has become because they didn't want to change and grow with the guy who ultimately bought them out.

Just as a side note... these "scores" for the Top Contributors on the right-hand side. Jay Hinrichs score is 8.58. My score has been going up and up and up. It's now at 7.72. It's basically saying I'm almost as good as Jay? I don't know what they hey that "score" means or is. It is meaningless. Jay and I are no where near on the same level of pretty much anything. You wouldn't know that just by looking at the scores though, now would you? 

 I don't think anyone is saying you're doing "it" the wrong way, if by "it" you mean pursuing an alternative career. I think the point that's trying to get pushed across is why wholesale? There's plenty of ways to make money in Real Estate and there's plenty examples of high performers doing just the role they chose..... 


But again it falls back to why wholesale and not one of the the other ways that typically better returns on time/money spent... 

And to clarify it's not that you can't or won't be successful, it's that you seem to have resources that would allow you to tackle something with a higher barrier of entry than wholesaling (which traditionally people use as a stepping stone vs focusing on just that).  Also to add, we know you needed a job change so it isn't about that either, it's soley about how'd you come to setting your sights only on wholesale vs (insert million and one ways to make money in real estate).

I've (rather unsuccessfully) tried the other routes part-time for close to a year now. I figure wholesaling will be a much faster way to make money (while allowing me to work for myself). I have had a whole lot of NOTHING with my other REI attempts aside from wasted time and money. I can't find good enough deals going the traditional routes. Done right, I figure wholesaling will help me build up a significant amount of cash (over time), blow open my network, get me out of my comfort zone/build confidence and RE knowledge faster than "traditional" routes, and give me access to some really great deals for my own personal portfolio when the time is right! I was really AGAINST wholesaling initially. Thinking it was sleazy, illegal, and not worthwhile. The other ways have been too slow for me and we've had some expenses that ate into the savings I built up, limiting the types of decent properties I could buy to... basically nothing. Even if buying an investment property, I'd be able to buy one, for $200-$400 in cash flow IF LUCKY. Not enough to leave my job any time soon. Then I'd have to work several more years to build up another deposit again. Also, I did not have enough capital/knowledge to get into rehabbing without taking a significant risk to my family. So I began researching wholesaling, and well, this route seemed to be the most feasible with the least amount of risk and biggest turnout for my personal situation. It's not for everyone. It is a LOT of work. However, for me and my situation, it will work. Still not sure if/when we will be moving out of state so once that is finalized, I may look into obtaining my real estate license in that state.

 Interesting, makes sense appreciate the response. If you don't mind, I have a follow-up.

When you wholesale you're looking at a house in it's current condition, making an offer, calculating repairs, and then coming up with ARV. Do you think that's going to be hard to do when you attempt to wholesale a property?

If you learn how to read/evaluate bids from contractors followed up by multiple bids you typically can greatly reduce your risk. Not that this would apply to the wholesale side, but if you ever tackle flip/rehab it could. You could always parnter too with someone who maybe has stronger construction skillset but lacks time and you have the stronger skillset of finding the home etc...

Originally posted by @Matt K. :
Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann:
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann:
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Terrell Williams:
@Mercedez H. From what I've heard about wholesaling...it can be very lucrative

 out of curiosity where'd you hear this... from what I've heard it's the exact opposite with a few exceptions.

 There's a "right" and a "wrong" way to do anything. I'm doing this the "wrong" way according to the masses. Good, because if the masses were doing this, it would truly be a waste of my time. I will fail and go back to a W-2 job with my "tail" between my legs. Right? I mean that's what the statistics say. Statistics have never bothered me. In fact, I rather love statistics (to a point, then it's just too complicated for my little brain). Statistics are a number and they mean very little. They are just "odds" and a tweak here or there and the very same numbers will give you very different results. In grad school, one of my professors was teaching us a 'NEW' way to analyze the effectiveness of an intervention. We used 2-3 different ways of analyzing said numbers, they all gave us a different answer and he, our professor, and the rest of the class - we couldn't make sense of it because it didn't make any damn sense. Also, you can manipulate charts and graphs to "show" anything you like because they are visual and we are merely human. It's really funny actually.

Opening your own business can be lucrative in general, but most burn straight to the ground. Some recover, case in point "Lego," check out their history. They almost completely died out, now it's EVERYWHERE. I'm just saying, statistics don't mean anything to the one person who makes it. You just got to find a way to make it work, until it REALLY DOESN'T, then go on to something else or try a different strategy. Being open and always learning and adapting are key here. The original owners of McDonald's were not willing to adapt and they were bought out and well, they missed out on what McDonald's has become because they didn't want to change and grow with the guy who ultimately bought them out.

Just as a side note... these "scores" for the Top Contributors on the right-hand side. Jay Hinrichs score is 8.58. My score has been going up and up and up. It's now at 7.72. It's basically saying I'm almost as good as Jay? I don't know what they hey that "score" means or is. It is meaningless. Jay and I are no where near on the same level of pretty much anything. You wouldn't know that just by looking at the scores though, now would you? 

 I don't think anyone is saying you're doing "it" the wrong way, if by "it" you mean pursuing an alternative career. I think the point that's trying to get pushed across is why wholesale? There's plenty of ways to make money in Real Estate and there's plenty examples of high performers doing just the role they chose..... 


But again it falls back to why wholesale and not one of the the other ways that typically better returns on time/money spent... 

And to clarify it's not that you can't or won't be successful, it's that you seem to have resources that would allow you to tackle something with a higher barrier of entry than wholesaling (which traditionally people use as a stepping stone vs focusing on just that).  Also to add, we know you needed a job change so it isn't about that either, it's soley about how'd you come to setting your sights only on wholesale vs (insert million and one ways to make money in real estate).

I've (rather unsuccessfully) tried the other routes part-time for close to a year now. I figure wholesaling will be a much faster way to make money (while allowing me to work for myself). I have had a whole lot of NOTHING with my other REI attempts aside from wasted time and money. I can't find good enough deals going the traditional routes. Done right, I figure wholesaling will help me build up a significant amount of cash (over time), blow open my network, get me out of my comfort zone/build confidence and RE knowledge faster than "traditional" routes, and give me access to some really great deals for my own personal portfolio when the time is right! I was really AGAINST wholesaling initially. Thinking it was sleazy, illegal, and not worthwhile. The other ways have been too slow for me and we've had some expenses that ate into the savings I built up, limiting the types of decent properties I could buy to... basically nothing. Even if buying an investment property, I'd be able to buy one, for $200-$400 in cash flow IF LUCKY. Not enough to leave my job any time soon. Then I'd have to work several more years to build up another deposit again. Also, I did not have enough capital/knowledge to get into rehabbing without taking a significant risk to my family. So I began researching wholesaling, and well, this route seemed to be the most feasible with the least amount of risk and biggest turnout for my personal situation. It's not for everyone. It is a LOT of work. However, for me and my situation, it will work. Still not sure if/when we will be moving out of state so once that is finalized, I may look into obtaining my real estate license in that state.

 Interesting, makes sense appreciate the response. If you don't mind, I have a follow-up.

When you wholesale you're looking at a house in it's current condition, making an offer, calculating repairs, and then coming up with ARV. Do you think that's going to be hard to do when you attempt to wholesale a property?

If you learn how to read/evaluate bids from contractors followed up by multiple bids you typically can greatly reduce your risk. Not that this would apply to the wholesale side, but if you ever tackle flip/rehab it could. You could always parnter too with someone who maybe has stronger construction skillset but lacks time and you have the stronger skillset of finding the home etc...

All valid points Matt! Calculating repairs is my weakest area of expertise right now. Being a female I also believe I personally was over-quoted on the prices I received from contractors when looking at potential rehabs this past year. In my own house, I've been screwed over by almost every single contractor - even on minor projects. I'm often treated as though I know NOTHING, that I am wasting their time, or am INTENSELY pressured into taking action or the price will go up. (Good-bye guys!) Then again, that could be a limiting belief - however, there's too much evidence to suggest otherwise. Either way, I'll look into learning more about rehabs/contractor costs as I progress, from people I trust who have more experience and aren't trying to screw me over. Now that I have all this "free time" I can get out there to investor lunches, REIA meetings, online networking, and the like, in order to find those trustworthy individuals. :)

Go get it! I have been cold calling and I find it very effective. I have not completed my first deal yet however I'm able to get in direct contact with homeowners to get a "yes/no/maybe" answer. Best part is it cost me $20 to get a list of code violations, skip trace the list (using lexis nexis, one of the best skip trace services) and start dialing by hand. I'm more than happy to share how I did it, PM me if you want to know how. 

Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann :
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann:
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Melanie Hartmann:
Originally posted by @Matt K.:
Originally posted by @Terrell Williams:
@Mercedez H. From what I've heard about wholesaling...it can be very lucrative

 out of curiosity where'd you hear this... from what I've heard it's the exact opposite with a few exceptions.

 There's a "right" and a "wrong" way to do anything. I'm doing this the "wrong" way according to the masses. Good, because if the masses were doing this, it would truly be a waste of my time. I will fail and go back to a W-2 job with my "tail" between my legs. Right? I mean that's what the statistics say. Statistics have never bothered me. In fact, I rather love statistics (to a point, then it's just too complicated for my little brain). Statistics are a number and they mean very little. They are just "odds" and a tweak here or there and the very same numbers will give you very different results. In grad school, one of my professors was teaching us a 'NEW' way to analyze the effectiveness of an intervention. We used 2-3 different ways of analyzing said numbers, they all gave us a different answer and he, our professor, and the rest of the class - we couldn't make sense of it because it didn't make any damn sense. Also, you can manipulate charts and graphs to "show" anything you like because they are visual and we are merely human. It's really funny actually.

Opening your own business can be lucrative in general, but most burn straight to the ground. Some recover, case in point "Lego," check out their history. They almost completely died out, now it's EVERYWHERE. I'm just saying, statistics don't mean anything to the one person who makes it. You just got to find a way to make it work, until it REALLY DOESN'T, then go on to something else or try a different strategy. Being open and always learning and adapting are key here. The original owners of McDonald's were not willing to adapt and they were bought out and well, they missed out on what McDonald's has become because they didn't want to change and grow with the guy who ultimately bought them out.

Just as a side note... these "scores" for the Top Contributors on the right-hand side. Jay Hinrichs score is 8.58. My score has been going up and up and up. It's now at 7.72. It's basically saying I'm almost as good as Jay? I don't know what they hey that "score" means or is. It is meaningless. Jay and I are no where near on the same level of pretty much anything. You wouldn't know that just by looking at the scores though, now would you? 

 I don't think anyone is saying you're doing "it" the wrong way, if by "it" you mean pursuing an alternative career. I think the point that's trying to get pushed across is why wholesale? There's plenty of ways to make money in Real Estate and there's plenty examples of high performers doing just the role they chose..... 


But again it falls back to why wholesale and not one of the the other ways that typically better returns on time/money spent... 

And to clarify it's not that you can't or won't be successful, it's that you seem to have resources that would allow you to tackle something with a higher barrier of entry than wholesaling (which traditionally people use as a stepping stone vs focusing on just that).  Also to add, we know you needed a job change so it isn't about that either, it's soley about how'd you come to setting your sights only on wholesale vs (insert million and one ways to make money in real estate).

I've (rather unsuccessfully) tried the other routes part-time for close to a year now. I figure wholesaling will be a much faster way to make money (while allowing me to work for myself). I have had a whole lot of NOTHING with my other REI attempts aside from wasted time and money. I can't find good enough deals going the traditional routes. Done right, I figure wholesaling will help me build up a significant amount of cash (over time), blow open my network, get me out of my comfort zone/build confidence and RE knowledge faster than "traditional" routes, and give me access to some really great deals for my own personal portfolio when the time is right! I was really AGAINST wholesaling initially. Thinking it was sleazy, illegal, and not worthwhile. The other ways have been too slow for me and we've had some expenses that ate into the savings I built up, limiting the types of decent properties I could buy to... basically nothing. Even if buying an investment property, I'd be able to buy one, for $200-$400 in cash flow IF LUCKY. Not enough to leave my job any time soon. Then I'd have to work several more years to build up another deposit again. Also, I did not have enough capital/knowledge to get into rehabbing without taking a significant risk to my family. So I began researching wholesaling, and well, this route seemed to be the most feasible with the least amount of risk and biggest turnout for my personal situation. It's not for everyone. It is a LOT of work. However, for me and my situation, it will work. Still not sure if/when we will be moving out of state so once that is finalized, I may look into obtaining my real estate license in that state.

 Interesting, makes sense appreciate the response. If you don't mind, I have a follow-up.

When you wholesale you're looking at a house in it's current condition, making an offer, calculating repairs, and then coming up with ARV. Do you think that's going to be hard to do when you attempt to wholesale a property?

If you learn how to read/evaluate bids from contractors followed up by multiple bids you typically can greatly reduce your risk. Not that this would apply to the wholesale side, but if you ever tackle flip/rehab it could. You could always parnter too with someone who maybe has stronger construction skillset but lacks time and you have the stronger skillset of finding the home etc...

All valid points Matt! Calculating repairs is my weakest area of expertise right now. Being a female I also believe I personally was over-quoted on the prices I received from contractors when looking at potential rehabs this past year. In my own house, I've been screwed over by almost every single contractor - even on minor projects. I'm often treated as though I know NOTHING, that I am wasting their time, or am INTENSELY pressured into taking action or the price will go up. (Good-bye guys!) Then again, that could be a limiting belief - however, there's too much evidence to suggest otherwise. Either way, I'll look into learning more about rehabs/contractor costs as I progress, from people I trust who have more experience and aren't trying to screw me over. Now that I have all this "free time" I can get out there to investor lunches, REIA meetings, online networking, and the like, in order to find those trustworthy individuals. :)

 That's not because you're a woman, that's because it's common and happens all the time. Once you learn how to mange that, it becomes easier. I could write a lengthy response but to save your thread I'll keep it short.... there's entire professions that exist simply to manage contracts/contractors for ALL the reason you listed. Construction though is especially challenging because things don't always turn out to be what you think they area, but contractors aren't always entitled to extra money....

If you study up (there's tons of resources) you can learn how to estimate costs and then as you get better you will be able to tailor them to your local market... But know, your buyers probably already know the costs. What I mean by this is if something costs 50k to remodel and you have listed as 25k and then your off (high) on your ARV that will lose you buyers/credibility. Be cautious too of using a contractor just for bids, unless you're going to pay them for that time... they will get annoyed and start giving you too high of numbers or simply stop working with you.

All of this assumes you target homes that are in need of repair like most wholesalers... but not sure if you're working on a different niche or not.

@Melanie Hartmann if you have a plan, if you were unhappy at your job and it was preventing you from doing real estate, OR if you simply just wanted to leave your job and try something new- I believe you can accomplish ANYTHING you set your mind to. I did something similar. i left a full time job a year ago to start a business. Everyone in my life was against it- but I knew it was the right decision for me. But ive also always been a little ballsy.... And u know what- those people still wake up at 6am to go to their jobs and I don’t. And it was the best decision I’ve ever made in my life. My business has been successful and I have a lot of freedom to focus om the ”bigger picture” such as investments and RE... The way you or i plan to spend our day- whetther it be to go to work or follow a bigger dream Is a very personal decision. But I’m rooting for u!

This post has been removed.

@Melanie Hartmann Kudos to your Enthusiasm and PMA (Positive Mental Attitude)! Both of these things are essential in your success. I have personally moved 10 times in the last 35+ years and am settled here in Colorado along the Front Range (Boulder/Denver) and Loving It! So if you do make a move here please look me up. I have had to restart each time I have moved and am usually up and running within the first 3 months. Would be happy to give you free insight, for what it's worth. LOL Now I create new business out of thin air daily. ;-)

@Melanie Hartmann I see your post as trending and couldn't believe how many pages it has.  all i can say is good luck!  wholesaling is good "job" if you turnover few houses a month. if you are not, then consider switching to flipping as soon as possible. 

-- much more money with flipping then wholesaling for $5-$10 per deal.

Following to that start building your own portfolio, if your fiance have good income then you should be able to buy and hold. consider the BRRRR strategy

Real wealth is what you hold and not what you buy and sell for cash-flow. 

Long term passive income is the key for long term financial freedom. 

Just PS: I started as wholesaler then graduated to be a flipper.. then buy and hold .... 

So go for it girl, but keep in mined the long term plan!!!

Originally posted by @Hadar Orkibi :

@Melanie Hartmann I see your post as trending and couldn't believe how many pages it has.  all i can say is good luck!  wholesaling is good "job" if you turnover few houses a month. if you are not, then consider switching to flipping as soon as possible. 

-- much more money with flipping then wholesaling for $5-$10 per deal.

Following to that start building your own portfolio, if your fiance have good income then you should be able to buy and hold. consider the BRRRR strategy

Real wealth is what you hold and not what you buy and sell for cash-flow. 

Long term passive income is the key for long term financial freedom. 

Just PS: I started as wholesaler then graduated to be a flipper.. then buy and hold .... 

So go for it girl, but keep in mined the long term plan!!!

Right? Who knew the post would get so much attention?? (Maybe I'm on to something here, haha)

Thank you for your words! The plan of wholesaling, then flipping, then buying and holding is THE plan. It's a great way to go about this (from what I understand).  Ultimately, before I "retire," I will own apartment complexes. 

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