I hate College, I’m ready for real estate.

137 Replies

Funny reading this because I just responded to someone who posted this not long ago. The reason why I say stay in school is to network! There is no other time in your life where you are around so many and it is seriously a gold mine to expand your social circle/sphere of influence. Ya, maybe 99% of college kids do not want to buy or sell a home, but maybe their parents, family members, friends? And maybe those college kids will want to buy 5-10 years down the line! Now if you do not plan on working in real estate in the location where you go to school, I understand that continuing to go to university may not be so beneficial. 

A few deals that I have closed have been off of my friends from university, so this obviously does work. Just network, hustle and have some fun while you are still young man!

Originally posted by @Austin R. Olds :
Originally posted by @Brian Wilson:
Originally posted by @Austin R. Olds:

@Brian Wilson

Hello,

I joined the Army on june 13th and ship out june 11th( DEP) delayed enlistment program. Im a senior at high school and my mos will be 35S. You said you were intel, what was your mos?

I was Navy (still in the reserves) so we had NEC's not MOS tags. I've done what you would call 35F and 35M type functions along with some other stuff. Good experience, just didn't like it enough to spend the rest of my life doing it. 

 Thats cool, i was looking around on glassdoor and saw there are a lot of high paying jobs for intelligence, i think i will be pretty bored in this mos but the job afterwards will be worth it. Thanks for sharing your experience with me.

 Those jobs are just as boring. I was a contractor on the civilian side for a bit. My military function was way more enjoyable but it was because of the command/unit/ mission I supported. If you want do something high speed try to get attached to an SF element. Lots of JSOC opportunities out there. Just do your best, learn as much as possible and stay humble. 

Plus those civilian jobs don't pay all that well. Look at the areas they require you to live (living near DC and making 75k a year is not much, trust me). The intel community is facing compressed wages post 2011. The grass isn't always greener on the other side.

Originally posted by @Brian Wilson :
Originally posted by @Austin R. Olds:
Originally posted by @Brian Wilson:
Originally posted by @Austin R. Olds:

@Brian Wilson

Hello,

I joined the Army on june 13th and ship out june 11th( DEP) delayed enlistment program. Im a senior at high school and my mos will be 35S. You said you were intel, what was your mos?

I was Navy (still in the reserves) so we had NEC's not MOS tags. I've done what you would call 35F and 35M type functions along with some other stuff. Good experience, just didn't like it enough to spend the rest of my life doing it. 

 Thats cool, i was looking around on glassdoor and saw there are a lot of high paying jobs for intelligence, i think i will be pretty bored in this mos but the job afterwards will be worth it. Thanks for sharing your experience with me.

 Those jobs are just as boring. I was a contractor on the civilian side for a bit. My military function was way more enjoyable but it was because of the command/unit/ mission I supported. If you want do something high speed try to get attached to an SF element. Lots of JSOC opportunities out there. Just do your best, learn as much as possible and stay humble. 

I mean i don’t plan on making careers out of them, but i will need a job with good pay so i can invest in real estate. The other thing is i have good relations with anytime fitness and they said they would make me a personal trainer if i wanted it after my enlistment contract is over(4years) however while it would be an amazing job, the pay is around 35-45k a year. The only problem is it would be much harder to invest in real estate with that yearly salary

There's a lot of benefits to earning a degree: the stick-to-it-tiveness, the people you meet (networking), learning (pick some classes that you actually do like), the discipline of doing something even though you don't necessarily love it (realities of life), and having a degree that some people will actually respect more (even just subconsciously). Start your side hustle and push forward is my opinion. Good luck whatever you decide! 

Oh man does this bring back memories, I remember wasting a half hour of my life watching a professor write a formula on the black board, when he was done I asked him to give mne one example of how anyone could use this in their life, he said "you will see this again on your test Friday then you will never see this again the rest of your life".

He was right.

And I thought about dropping out at least once a month, but stayed and got my masters degree. I am glad I did even though I never used it. 

I vote to hang in there, when you get your degree you will be glad you did and out will never hurt you even if you don't learn anything. 

After college you will have lots of time to make millions.

I’ve read much of the back and forth on this thread and have my own opinions on this. Some of you won’t like it. But, I’m older and speak my mind. ;)

I spent 23 years in corporate America and hired many people. I now actually teach college accounting classes part time. So, I do have a great deal of real-world experience hiring young people and teaching them.

I won’t over generalize and say all 20 somethings fit this description. But, many are looking for instant gratification. This is the Information Age. You can download things immediately. You get stuff from Amazon in two days and even that is too long to wait. Everything has to be fast. Young people get bored faster. And bail on stuff.

I’ve definitely observed this over the last few years. My advice is to slow down and really evaluate the situation. I tell my own teenage kids to quit complaining and running away from every problem. Stand up and finish something. However, I am with this guy on the evils of student loan debt. Kids get into it and have no idea what they are in for.... and it is NOT dischargeable in bankruptcy. Go to technical school for a year and learn a trade cheaper. That’s an option too.

@Jess White   I don't think those problems are created by going to college, but making life choices. I do think we need to reform the college system so that it doesn't take so long to get degrees, etc. There's a reason all the doctors, engineers, nurses, etc. are from other countries, 

Originally posted by @Karen Margrave :

@Jess White   I don't think those problems are created by going to college, but making life choices. I do think we need to reform the college system so that it doesn't take so long to get degrees, etc. There's a reason all the doctors, engineers, nurses, etc. are from other countries, 

 Doctors, engineers, etc...from other countries come here to learn in our Universities...then go back to their native country (supposed to) to teach.  That plan hasn't worked out well for the "other countries" though.  Too many of the "other country" students just stayed here and set up practices.

@Joe Villeneuve that's true in many cases, however; go into any hospital and look at how many of the nurses are Filipino. The point I was making was that the programs offered in our colleges and universities are overly broad, and require too many classes that are completely unrelated to the discipline. We need to reform our education system, and have a way to train engineers, physicians, nurses faster, and have less competition for programs. 

Originally posted by @Karen Margrave :

@Joe Villeneuve that's true in many cases, however; go into any hospital and look at how many of the nurses are Filipino. The point I was making was that the programs offered in our colleges and universities are overly broad, and require too many classes that are completely unrelated to the discipline. We need to reform our education system, and have a way to train engineers, physicians, nurses faster, and have less competition for programs. 

 What you are looking for is highly trained professionals, that are experts in their field, but have no common sense, no social skills, no way to relate to anything outside of their discipline, etc...

Ever try to talk to a Doctor, or any professional for that matter, that spent all their time in school focused on only the classes that matched their discipline?

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