Real Estate Investing Basics

6 Easy Ways to Be Taken Seriously As a Newbie Investor

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In order to be taken seriously as a real estate investor, I must have experience…

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In order to have experience, I must do deals…

In order to do deals, I must be taken seriously…

Hmm. Sounds like a Catch-22, doesn’t it?

Well, fear not, young investor! You don’t need to have $1 billion in real estate or properties all over the world in order to be taken seriously as a real estate investor. As a matter of fact, here are a few easy steps that you can take now in order to build your “street cred” and show people that you mean business.

6 Easy Ways to Be Taken Seriously As a Newbie Investor

1. Dress the Part

My folks always used to tell me that it’s better to be overdressed than underdressed. It was true at my junior prom, and it’s true today.

Related: Newbies: You Should Focus on Your First Deal And Nothing Else. Here’s Why.

Make a point to dress professionally whenever you plan on meeting with a bank, a property manager, a contractor, a potential renter, etc. Showing up in a suit (or at the very least some slacks and a button down) will do wonders for their perception of you, as well as your own confidence. Let's be honest. Do you think a bank is going to hand over $100k to a 27 yr old wearing Old Navy cargo shorts, flip flops, and a cut-off sleeve t-shirt with the logo of an emo band they were in back in high school? Look, your band isn't going to make it. Sorry. That was a decade ago. Take a trip to Men's Wearhouse and take advantage of their buy 1 get 3 free deals.

makemore

2. Get a Professional Email Address

[email protected] and [email protected] are not professional email addresses. Please, for the love of the internet, get a new one.

Simple is effective. Get one that has some combination of your first, middle or last names. This makes it very easy to tell someone over the phone or in person. You also avoid a potentially awkward conversation when you have to explain to a commercial lender how to spell “[email protected]

Good luck with that.

3. Ask Questions

Are you about to meet with a potential property manager? Are you going to attend a real estate club meeting this week? Are you scheduled to sit down with your real estate lawyer?

If so, take a minute and write out a list of questions before you go. I learned more about the process for getting a loan approved by sitting down with a lender and asking him questions for 10 minutes than I ever could have learned from reading a book. Remember, if you are excited to learn, they will be excited to teach.

As Dale Carnegie said, “Talk to someone about themselves, and they’ll listen for hours.”

4. Practice Property Grammar and Spelling

“UR” instead of “You are” when texting your best friend = socially acceptable.

“UR” instead of “You are” when emailing the lending department at your bank = not socially acceptable.

Also, please don’t write in ALL CAPS. It’s like you’re yelling at the computer.

5. Provide Value

Just because you are new to real estate doesn’t mean you have no value to provide. Here’s a few ways you can do it.

private-money-meeting

Related: The Newbie Challenge: 30 Steps to Get Started in Real Estate in 30 Days

6. Be Yourself

If there is one sure-fire way for people to NOT take you seriously, it’s if you act like you already have all of the answers.

The real estate investment community is one of the most supportive and friendly groups in the world. This is primarily due to the fact that it’s a relationship built business, and everyone realizes that their next deal could come from anywhere… even from someone who is brand new.

So don’t claim to have done deals all over the world when you haven’t. Don’t claim to have organized $1 billion in real estate transactions when you haven’t.

Just be yourself! You’re probably pretty good at it.

[We are republishing this article to help out our newer members.]

What have YOU done to grow your credibility as a newbie investor?

Leave a comment, and let’s talk.

Tyler is a pilot by day and aspiring entrepreneur by night. He started investing in April of 2014 and acquired three properties in the first 8 months. His goal is to become financially independent through real estate in order to free up time for travel and starting businesses.

    Richard Guzman
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Great post– good read for the day!!! Thanks for sharing. All good points to work on and live by as a newbie investor!!
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Thanks Rich! Glad I could help.
    Kay Durand from San Francisco, California
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Love that even the pilot needs to free up time to travel! Thanks for the tips!
    Sandy Salazar Investor from Baldwin Park, California
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Great read! Thanks Tyler. I especially love the part regarding professional email. By all means you can keep your [email protected] for your personal emails, but like you said create a separate business email for your real estate ventures. I always laugh when I read tenants application and they have a funky email address that they made up back in high school and complain why they can’t get a good paying job.
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Haha! I couldn’t agree more. I had some pretty epic e-mail addresses back in the day too. Thanks for the comment!
    John Burwell from Roxboro, North Carolina
    Replied over 2 years ago
    Hi Tyler, great post. I am a truck driver by trade, I have good credit and interested in getting in to real estate to work for my self, how does someone like me get started?
    Anthony Gayden Rental Property Investor from Omaha, NE
    Replied about 4 years ago
    You missed the most obvious answer. Do deals. Before I did my first deal, no one really thought I was being serious. I’m sure that there are a thousand people out there who have looked at property or talked about buying property and never bought a single thing. When you close that first deal, everyone takes you more seriously.
    Timothy Friars
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Nice add-on to a great article, Anthony. Very solid point.
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I absolutely agree Anthony. Thanks for the comment.
    Nicholas Henriksen Engineer from Harrisonburg, Virginia
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I feel the same way Anthony, I’ve decided not to talk too much about “making deals” before I’ve actually made one. Great post!
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    100% agree. Thanks for the post Nicholas.
    Troy W. from Upper Marlboro, Maryland
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Great read Tyler! Keep up the great work…stuff like this I wish knew back when I first started. So any newbie should be able to appreciate this reading.
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Thanks Troy!
    Matt McConkey Rental Property Investor from Scottsdale, AZ
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I’m posting this to follow suit (pun intended) on the well written and inspiration article, Tyler. Thank you for sharing and helping us newbies with your words.
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I love me a good pun! Thanks for the comment Matt.
    Lee Gloyd from Fort Pierce, Florida
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Thanks for this information. I’m starting out as a wholesaler, and wasn’t quite sure on the best attire to wear when dealing with sellers. I’ve read that it’s best not to be too over dressed yet not too under dressed either, but more so business casual when dealing with a wholesale transaction. I was also told by a local wholsaler that it’s best to look like an “average Joe”, rather than a business person as it would intimidate the seller. What are your thoughts as far as attire for wholesalers?
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I’m not a wholesaler myself, but I can absolutely see what you mean. I think you’re right. It would probably be best to dress nicely, but not over-the-top when meeting with a potential seller. The last thing you want to do is look like a snake oil salesman when showing up to someone’s personal home unexpected. Great point. Thanks for the comment Lee!
    Kay Durand from San Francisco, California
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I like the suit pants and button up shirt, no tie, suit jacket on or off! And semi dressy shoes! It’s polished but not too much.
    Jim Viens Rental Property Investor from Kansas City, KS
    Replied about 4 years ago
    The best advice I’ve seen on that it just khakis and a nice polo shirt. Professional, but not intimidating.
    Andrew Weikel Investor from Blacksburg, Virginia
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Great post, Tyler! The challenges of being a newbie, and on top of that, young, aspiring real estate investor can be very trying..as I’m learning right now. This post came at a good time. Thank you!
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Thanks Andrew. I’m glad it came at the right time. Best of luck investing!
    Aleksandar P. Investor from Chicago, Illinois
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Tyler, thanks for the post. Very good points. I am surprised that you didn’t put one of the most easiest and most effective way how to be taken seriously if you don’t have RE experience – learn RE Vocabulary! It doesn’t cost a dime (except your time) but it makes such a difference. Thanks!
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Absolutely! Thats a great #7. REI vocabulary is huge. Thanks Aleksandar.
    Alberto Albino from CORTLAND, NY
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Tyler, Great post!! I also agree with ALEXANDAR P. REI can be very confusing if you don’t learn the vocabulary. I am learning right now.
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    You’re right. Learning the vocabulary is huge. Keep up the good work!
    Colin Reid Investor from Tampa, FL
    Replied about 4 years ago
    HA! I actually did walk into a lender’s office in shorts, flip flops, an old T-shirt, at 28 years of age, and they gave me $107k! I wasn’t PLANNING on doing that, though. We had already started the deal, all over the phone and email (which was when I got the professional email address) because the lender was 2 hours away. I “went to town” on a completely non-business trip and got a call saying they needed a signature. I was right around the corner from the office, so I went over and signed the documents they needed, looking like a college kid. Of course, if I had any expectation of doing business that day, I would have gotten dressed.
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Haha! That’s awesome. I see I stand corrected :-). Keep up the great work.
    Tranice Davis from Snellville, Georgia
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Hello, You guys have very informative information. I’m new to wholesaling and this website is filled with so much knowledge. Thank You
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Bigger Pockets is such an amazing resource…Glad you found it. Best of luck Tranice and thanks for the comment!
    NormaJean Cupp from Virginia Beach, Virginia
    Replied about 4 years ago
    All great tips! Dressing”up” is my standard go-to. First impressions count and like I always tell my children, people will grow to like you even more when they know you are serious!
    Tyler Flagg Investor from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I think those are great words to live by. Thanks NormaJean!
    Richard Carter
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Hi, Thank you Tyler for sharing this article. I have enjoyed reading it. Great list of tips. I must admit that I am guilty on #4 rule..haha. Richard
    David Grimm from Laurel, Maryland
    Replied about 4 years ago
    I like this list! I’m just starting out and have found that people take you more seriously when you offer something to them instead of ask for something from them. For example, I need some experience analyzing buy-and-hold properties, so instead of asking around for someone to mentor me, I offered to be a bird dog and find deals for anyone who will have me. People responded to this very seriously and I know the experience I need will rub off on me from the work I do for them.
    Ryan Corris from Monroe, Ohio
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Great read Tyler! Thanks for taking the time to put this into words! So much of what we need to do to be successful in life is often common sense type things. However, when your brain is spread out over so many new ideas and wondering what the first step is, common sense often take a back seat. I always told my own children as they were looking for their first jobs to dress up and look nice, even if it was a job in fast food. Anything that you can do to make a good first impression and stand out above your competition can make a world of difference and show your future employers and partners that you mean business.
    Eric Franklin Investor from Delray Beach, Florida
    Replied about 4 years ago
    What a great post! Thank you, Tyler. This was a very encouraging post for us newbies!
    John Hamilton Real Estate Transaction Engineer from Jacksonville, Florida
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Great article Tyler! So much of this business, and life, is all about relationships. Family, friends, work, business, customers, etc. And you’re right that a deal can come from anyone. As newbies, it’s not hard to think there is no value. You have given those with this mindset to rethink their place in the RE world and sites like BP.
    Don Alberts from Frankfort, Illinois
    Replied about 4 years ago
    Tyker, thanks for your views. I believe that Presentation is so important in all walks of life. If I want to be taken seriously I must look like I have the authority to contribute. Not going over the top but looking Professional is, in my opinion, the way to go. Have a Great Day. Don
    Don Schieble
    Replied almost 4 years ago
    Good feedback, thank you.
    Mohammed Faheem
    Replied about 3 years ago
    Very helpful post! Thank you
    Alex Gamboa from Pasadena, California
    Replied over 2 years ago
    Awesome to hear the fundamentals of starting out! Thank you
    Andy Mason
    Replied over 2 years ago
    Practice Property grammar and spelling, or proper? Haha, normally I wouldn’t point it out to someone but the location was too ironic.
    Jonathan Fowler Entrepreneur from Frisco, TX
    Replied over 2 years ago
    “Property Grammar” I think you mean “Proper Grammer.” It looks like you had real estate on the mind. 😉 Thanks for the great article!
    Whitney Tutt Investor from Mableton, Georgia
    Replied over 2 years ago
    HA!
    Jasmine Benford Real Estate Agent from Hampton, VA
    Replied over 2 years ago
    Great read! Great points!
    Thomas Berry
    Replied about 2 years ago
    Simple and effective! Dress and prepare like you respect yourself and the other persons time. If only deals would fall in your lap for dressing the part.
    April Littleton from Dayton, Ohio
    Replied over 1 year ago
    Thanks for this article. It is still helpful years later. I signed up for a meet up this coming Monday. To present myself more credible I have been D4D to have properties to discuss/ask questions about and I have been doing a lot of reading to make sure I understand the lingo. Next step is to be more active on BP because you are absolutely right. Real Estate is a relationship industry and building my network is something I can and should do now. Thanks!
    Nichole Bolton from Lithia Springs, GA
    Replied about 1 year ago
    Hello. I am a new member of BiggerPockets and I wasn’t sure how to break the ice and become a part of the community until I read your article. Thank you so much for the advice!
    George Cline
    Replied about 1 year ago
    Great article to help us who are starting out, thank you!