Endless Possiblities: Is activist investor one of them?

2 Replies

I just recently joined BP and started listening to the podcasts and have been reading BP blogs and forum discussions, learning a lot.

Before I joined and the reason I joined was I was thinking of investing, well buying and holding in the city north of mine, Baltimore. Unlike DC, I can buy something with money from my savings in Charm City. So my sole focus was buy and hold for cash that I had on hand. Then I start listening and reading and learning and all these possibilities that I had never considered before, such as looking in my own back yard, financing options, etc.

I also run (well, inherited and I'm keeping it on life support) a blog about vacant nuisance properties in DC. Before that I ran a popular neighborhood blog where I would occasionally talk about real estate and development in a transitional neighborhood. That was and is my neighborhood activism. 

So after about 2 weeks of BP, a thought enters my head, instead of just complaining about poorly kept and vacant buildings that are preventing a street or block from being its best, why not put my money (or other people's money) where my mouth is? I spoke to my husband about this and he asked where would my (our) investment do the most good? Don't get me wrong, I'd like to make some money too, but I want to help uplift a neighborhood as a landlady. He did ask a good question, something I'd have to research. I know NW and NE DC better than I do B'more, and I know what areas have the best chance of getting better. But Baltimore needs more people willing to give it a chance.

Anyway, I'm just thinking out-loud. But what do you think, mixing your activism with real estate?

I'm afraid I can't really help you out with any information, but I understand completely what you want to do. There are several neighborhoods in Oklahoma City that I've been wanting to adopt for years. I'll certainly be rooting for you. Just do it!

Originally posted by @M Marie M. :

I just recently joined BP and started listening to the podcasts and have been reading BP blogs and forum discussions, learning a lot.

Before I joined and the reason I joined was I was thinking of investing, well buying and holding in the city north of mine, Baltimore. Unlike DC, I can buy something with money from my savings in Charm City. So my sole focus was buy and hold for cash that I had on hand. Then I start listening and reading and learning and all these possibilities that I had never considered before, such as looking in my own back yard, financing options, etc.

I also run (well, inherited and I'm keeping it on life support) a blog about vacant nuisance properties in DC. Before that I ran a popular neighborhood blog where I would occasionally talk about real estate and development in a transitional neighborhood. That was and is my neighborhood activism. 

So after about 2 weeks of BP, a thought enters my head, instead of just complaining about poorly kept and vacant buildings that are preventing a street or block from being its best, why not put my money (or other people's money) where my mouth is? I spoke to my husband about this and he asked where would my (our) investment do the most good? Don't get me wrong, I'd like to make some money too, but I want to help uplift a neighborhood as a landlady. He did ask a good question, something I'd have to research. I know NW and NE DC better than I do B'more, and I know what areas have the best chance of getting better. But Baltimore needs more people willing to give it a chance.

Anyway, I'm just thinking out-loud. But what do you think, mixing your activism with real estate?

A few neigborhoods in and around Philly do this 'activist investing' as you call it. They have established non-profit organizations and have purchased vacant properties, fix them up then turn around and rent them out. I learned this via due diligence on other houses on that block and see that one particular owner has several houses in a 1/2 mile radius.  The community is improved upon, someone has affordable housing and the city gets payment for the taxes. 

If you rub elbows with council and do a bit of research to secure some grants you will likely be able to purchase those properties for next to nothing. You might be able to do it as a for profit entity also but certain grants are specifically for non-profit orgs only. 

I wanted to do this in some North Philly neighborhoods by bringing together the community(residents, churches, small business) to put up funds, maybe crowd-fund, to purchase and renovate certain houses, that aren't teardowns, and put families in there on a lease/purchase opportunity. The community is involved so they will be more vigilant of illegal activity and whathaveyou. Only thing is I can't stand being a landlady, which would definitely be an issue when its my idea that I'm bringing to them. I do feel its a fantastic idea and hope you get it going strong.

Kudos,

Mary

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