I have free tuition for college. What degree should you get?

42 Replies

So i have free tuition for college while on active duty. What college degree would best set me up for a career in real estate, if any? I want start investing as soon as possible and eventually get into development. Any and all input will be helpful. Thank you.

A degree isn’t necessary for building a business in real estate....neither is one for being s realtor......the closest functional degree is economics but even that is fluff(minored in economics) most of what is in these college degree programs is all theory. 

If you want a good degree excluding real estate get something in engineering. 

Finance, civil engineering, urban planning, real estate, construction management. 

Take some class that shows you how to budget and save. 

Without it you got no chance. 

For real estate, there's no actual degree for it. My wife got a masters in "Urban Planning". It gives you the theoretical background in real estate. She finally got a job in "City Planning", which involves zoning, issuing permits among other things. She gets to meet real estate investors and developers.

She also got a real estate sales license and worked at it for a few years. You have to take a course and pass the licensing exam. She did it right after college, and back then, you don't collect a salary, but she knew the broker personally, and she didn't pay a desk fee either. Her job involves driving people around showing houses and I'm told she sold 3 houses the first year. She wouldn't done better at a desk job somewhere.

It's funny that with all that education, you drive people around to see houses all for no pay.

I got a degree in electrical engineering. When I couldn't find a job in it, I took a masters in "Finance". Then we thought about going into real estate. Then I took the "Certificate in Real Estate" at the NYU school which includes the licensing course, and I took and passed the RE licensing course, but did not work under a broker because by then, I had good paying job in IT.

As to whether all the real estate courses we took put us at a advantage in real estate? Not really. For one, we had to drive around different areas looking for the best city or state to invest in. The courses didn't go into that. When the market crash came in the mid 1990's, I purchase foreclosures, went to auctions every week. I learned a lot, but not from school. 

The only course that was of value was taught by an actual real estate investor, whose family is in the business, and he was in charge of commercial leasing at the business. He's also on the board in the Real Estate Board of NY and contributed $1 million to start the real estate school so knows and made money in real estate, not some BS guru. At the beginning of the course, he said that the curriculum provided by the school was all BS, and he'll spend the  semester covering actual deals he did. I learned the most from this course.

All in all, real estate investing is learned more by doing than in schooling.

The degree that will pay the most money. There is no degree that will teach you how to be a real estate investor.

Get the degree that offers the most income and potential for growth .then use the income to purchase real estate . I would not dedicate my field or education to real estate .your degree choice makes a huge difference in income. it needs to be a solid plan that can withstand an unstable economy and provide You decades of security,not just something linked to a future interest . I would choose either *engineering or something related to a *medical specialist if it was me . You have an opportunity most don’t get so be careful on this decision . Think it out 

My personal philosophy when it comes to degrees: the annual salary for the job the degree qualifies you for should be equal or greater to the cost of the degree itself. For example, if an engineering degree costs you 60k to earn, the annual salary of the job you get should be 60k or more. You have a great opportunity here. Choose something you enjoy that will make you money, then funnel that money into your Real estate business.

@Mac B. I would pick a field that you expect to enjoy and which would earn you a good salary once you graduate. With a high paying job and job satisfaction, you would be able to have a lot of money to invest in real estate. I would study real estate on the side so that once you have a good paying job you will be ready to purchase real estate.

University of Florida has an excellent construction management program 

Originally posted by @Mike H. :

University of Florida has an excellent construction management program 

that is  good point worth noting . When it comes to real estate ..I’d be far more inclined to learn how to build and rehab houses before I would get a degree in accounting or business management . This is would be huge advantage over other investors 

Choose the degree you have the greatest passion for with the highest possible income. Your choice will be your future job for life. You do not want to end up being one of those that want's out of the "rat race".

YOU need to determine what career path you want. It may be related to real estate but has nothing to do with real estate investing. They are two separate issues.

Choose the wrong degree and you will likely fail due to lack of interest and drive.  

Business, I never went to college, but is something as a sole proprietor i do wish i went to college to get more out of. with a business degree you will learn how to be able to run any business you start, efficiently. That is something i have told my Children, that even if it is not your own business you will be starting, you would be able to apply for a job almost any where, and if you minor in Construction, you will know how to run the real estate end as well as the Construction end.

WOW. I was not expecting so many responses so quickly. This community is awesome. I know one degree won’t directly translate into real estate but I guess I was searching for one that would compliment it.. i.e. accounting or finance. Thanks for all the input so far!

@Mac B. It is more important to see what classes a particular degree offers. I am doing business administration because of the classes it offers in finance, economics, and marketing. Maybe taking a few classes from an accredited university to help your skills, but there is not a particular degree field for real estate investing.
-Study civil engineering -get an engineering job that pays good money -save said money to buy real estate -make real estate investing way easier for yourself -????? -profit

Technology is now and the future! Go for a mix. I'd say, Major in Accounting or Finance and minor in Information Systems or vise versa! Good luck!

I'm currently writing a blog post about this, but in my opinion nursing degrees are some of the best degrees you can get if you want to go into business for yourself. You can always take accounting or business classes for electives or a minor. A starting RN salary averages around $70,000 a year and most hospital based nurses are on a 3 or 4 day work week, which gives you several days a week to work on your own business.

Hospitals usually offer pretty solid benefits and if you are looking at contract or travel nursing you can get all of your living expenses paid for as well. There aren't many other associate or bachelor degrees that start out with that kind of flexibility and salary. 

Definitely in health care. I would go with a pharmacology degree. In America, the big bucks are in selling drugs. We all know that.

@Mac B. I would choose a 2 year program for HVAC. Heating/Air Conditioning. My nephew makes $160k a year with one little Google ad. You go to work with a power screwdriver and a voltmeter! No homeowner wants to touch that stuff so you'll always have work.
You also would have your student loan paid off in a short time.
Originally posted by @Peter Prawel :
@Mac B. I would choose a 2 year program for HVAC. Heating/Air Conditioning. My nephew makes $160k a year with one little Google ad. You go to work with a power screwdriver and a voltmeter! No homeowner wants to touch that stuff so you'll always have work.

wow I did hvac for a summer but I didn’t know you can make that kind of money. Currently I am limited to online classes unless I go to a local school here. 

@Mac B. My nephew started out working for a guy, then got certified through a 2 year trade school and then went after his contractor license. Nobody wants to touch their own furnace or a/c unit. They don't beat you up on your price. The lady of the house will tell you "Just Fix It NOW" ha ha. You will always have work.
@Mac B. I did Mechanical engineering. Worked out for me so far. Getting a second engineering degree now. I’d say your best options are engineering, construction management or finance. Some of that depends on the school though. A finance degree from a school no one know of or isn’t accredited won’t be worth much. Make sure your engineering program is accredited too by ABET. If it’s not it’s not worth your time
Originally posted by @Mac B. :

WOW. I was not expecting so many responses so quickly. This community is awesome. I know one degree won’t directly translate into real estate but I guess I was searching for one that would compliment it.. i.e. accounting or finance. Thanks for all the input so far!

 You don't need accounting or finance. Real estate is mostly simple math. Maybe some 8th grade level math in there. But no more

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