Rentals - Where to Buy - What to Avoid - Here's The Secret

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I ran across this and thought it was an interesting take. It was put together by WalletHub Jul 25, 2018 | Adam McCann, Financial Writer, and Called - "2018’s Best & Worst Places to Rent in America"

Investors can learn quite a bit by studying what our Markets are dealing with; trends for renters and buyers.

"Roughly 43 million American households have opted to rent rather than buy their homes because of convenience, cost or both." and "demand for affordable housing exceeding supply, more than one-quarter of all renters – 11.1 million people in total – spend more than 50 percent of their income on housing. They are classified as “severely cost-burdened” by federal housing agencies as a result."

You can Click on The Icons To See Them better

Hopefully the following Table will be readable 

Overall Rank Overall Rank Total Score ‘Rental Market & Affordability’ Rank ‘Quality of Life’ Rank
(1 = Best) City
1 Scottsdale, AZ 69.26 14 1
2 Peoria, AZ 66.72 12 2
3 Chandler, AZ 66.41 22 3
4 Gilbert, AZ 66.16 7 9
5 Fargo, ND 63.16 2 49
6 Bismarck, ND 63 3 50
7 Overland Park, KS 61.76 17 16
8 Lincoln, NE 61.41 19 29
9 Mesa, AZ 59.56 38 23
10 Tempe, AZ 59.5 28 28





11 Irvine, CA 59.49 111 4
12 Nashua, NH 59.48 57 13
13 Sioux Falls, SD 59.15 4 86
14 Boise, ID 59.03 68 15
15 Phoenix, AZ 58.63 44 30
16 Omaha, NE 58.31 27 44
17 Lewiston, ME 57.84 23 46
18 Glendale, AZ 57.52 37 40
19 El Paso, TX 57.24 50 37
20 Cedar Rapids, IA 57.06 5 81





21 Tampa, FL 56.59 130 7
22 Charleston, SC 56.43 59 26
23 Huntsville, AL 56.3 1 121
24 Plano, TX 55.97 66 35
25 Casper, WY 55.75 6 97
26 Henderson, NV 55.59 29 59
27 Portland, ME 55.47 58 36
28 South Burlington, VT 55.37 81 25
29 San Diego, CA 55.33 157 6
30 Rapid City, SD 55.05 8 100





31 Madison, WI 54.84 53 52
32 Fremont, CA 54.54 121 18
33 Reno, NV 54.44 34 66
34 Manchester, NH 54.21 72 38
35 Orlando, FL 53.87 139 17
36 Fort Smith, AR 53.8 9 108
37 Grand Prairie, TX 53.77 97 22
38 Tucson, AZ 53.75 56 58
39 Las Cruces, NM 53.7 13 102
40 Austin, TX 53.53 76 47





41 Amarillo, TX 53.37 42 65
42 Cape Coral, FL 53.22 145 11
43 Des Moines, IA 53.01 45 68
44 Huntington Beach, CA 52.8 161 5
45 San Francisco, CA 52.55 107 41
46 Chesapeake, VA 52.43 10 118
47 Raleigh, NC 52.43 15 113
48 Las Vegas, NV 52.38 40 77
49 Newport News, VA 52.19 11 120
50 Virginia Beach, VA 52.01 24 98





51 Colorado Springs, CO 51.93 62 64
52 Honolulu, HI 51.61 160 27
53 Jacksonville, FL 51.51 91 55
54 Santa Rosa, CA 51.49 165 10
55 Cheyenne, WY 51.45 33 104
56 Chula Vista, CA 51.26 146 32
57 Sacramento, CA 50.76 149 34
58 St. Petersburg, FL 50.71 141 42
59 Grand Rapids, MI 50.69 96 56
60 Fort Worth, TX 50.67 71 70





61 Charlotte, NC 50.61 31 107
62 Nampa, ID 50.58 106 53
63 Winston-Salem, NC 50.48 26 125
64 Santa Clarita, CA 50.43 171 8
65 Salem, OR 50.35 73 69
66 Glendale, CA 50.17 169 12
67 Irving, TX 50.05 74 74
68 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 50.04 151 21
69 Columbia, MD 50.03 36 126
70 San Antonio, TX 49.89 70 79





71 Pittsburgh, PA 49.76 82 72
72 Kansas City, MO 49.62 46 103
73 Durham, NC 49.43 16 144
74 Dallas, TX 49.43 104 67
75 Fontana, CA 49.3 114 57
76 Juneau, AK 49.24 18 148
77 Garland, TX 49.21 138 54
78 Bakersfield, CA 49.18 52 99
79 Birmingham, AL 49.12 30 134
80 Port St. Lucie, FL 48.96 166 24





81 Greensboro, NC 48.87 35 135
82 Long Beach, CA 48.71 163 39
83 Oklahoma City, OK 48.69 43 116
84 San Jose, CA 48.53 156 45
85 Arlington, TX 48.46 89 78
86 Denver, CO 48.42 127 61
87 Nashville, TN 48.36 77 92
88 Los Angeles, CA 48.33 172 33
89 Lexington-Fayette, KY 48.21 61 101
90 Atlanta, GA 47.95 118 71





91 Billings, MT 47.92 51 124
92 Anaheim, CA 47.87 167 43
93 North Las Vegas, NV 47.78 47 122
94 Oceanside, CA 47.64 178 14
95 Chattanooga, TN 47.63 85 91
96 Little Rock, AR 47.33 25 160
97 Washington, DC 47.21 64 110
98 Albuquerque, NM 47.18 20 147
99 Oxnard, CA 47.13 152 51
100 Cincinnati, OH 47 103 89





101 Minneapolis, MN 46.97 110 87
102 Portland, OR 46.93 124 76
103 West Valley City, UT 46.91 100 90
104 Columbus, OH 46.83 87 95
105 Missoula, MT 46.75 65 123
106 Pembroke Pines, FL 46.7 175 20
107 Garden Grove, CA 46.66 176 19
108 Fayetteville, NC 46.65 21 168
109 Riverside, CA 46.53 129 75
110 St. Paul, MN 46.39 120 85





111 Laredo, TX 46.18 123 82
112 Ontario, CA 46.07 164 48
113 Yonkers, NY 45.68 95 106
114 Fresno, CA 45.63 83 111
115 Aurora, IL 45.55 98 105
116 Wichita, KS 45.55 32 155
117 Modesto, CA 45.5 88 109
118 Brownsville, TX 45.49 117 94
119 Salt Lake City, UT 45.48 69 132
120 Mobile, AL 45.28 49 152





121 Dover, DE 45.13 54 154
122 Columbia, SC 44.95 67 139
123 New York, NY 44.81 142 84
124 Moreno Valley, CA 44.73 148 73
125 Corpus Christi, TX 44.72 102 112
126 Norfolk, VA 44.55 41 161
127 Louisville, KY 44.45 75 136
128 Richmond, VA 43.87 60 173
129 Houston, TX 43.82 86 131
130 St. Louis, MO 43.66 55 158





131 Seattle, WA 43.56 158 83
132 Jersey City, NJ 43.55 80 138
133 Warwick, RI 43.37 122 115
134 Chicago, IL 43.19 78 140
135 Knoxville, TN 43.14 125 117
136 Stockton, CA 43.11 109 127
137 Montgomery, AL 43.02 63 164
138 Augusta, GA 42.82 90 143
139 Aurora, CO 42.82 150 96
140 Miami, FL 42.71 177 63





141 Gulfport, MS 42.6 113 133
142 Anchorage, AK 42.56 39 172
143 Lubbock, TX 42.49 115 130
144 Springfield, MO 42.44 48 176
145 Fort Lauderdale, FL 42.42 174 62
146 Philadelphia, PA 42.35 140 114
147 Vancouver, WA 42.22 159 93
148 Boston, MA 42.19 168 88
149 Spokane, WA 42.07 101 142
150 Tulsa, OK 42.02 92 141





151 Tallahassee, FL 41.39 135 129
152 Santa Ana, CA 41.35 179 60
153 San Bernardino, CA 41.33 144 119
154 Fort Wayne, IN 41.01 99 151
155 Milwaukee, WI 40.92 94 156
156 Rochester, NY 40.78 105 157
157 Burlington, VT 40.46 128 146
158 Pearl City, HI 40.26 181 31
159 Indianapolis, IN 40.2 84 167
160 Columbus, GA 39.97 116 162





161 Wilmington, DE 39.8 93 169
162 Newark, NJ 39.48 79 170
163 Tacoma, WA 39.48 137 149
164 Worcester, MA 39.41 133 150
165 Buffalo, NY 39.18 119 163
166 Oakland, CA 39.17 154 137
167 Baton Rouge, LA 38.93 126 159
168 New Orleans, LA 38.4 143 145
169 Charleston, WV 37.62 112 179
170 Akron, OH 37.58 155 153





171 Toledo, OH 37.35 131 166
172 Shreveport, LA 36.93 135 171
173 Jackson, MS 36.79 147 165
174 Hialeah, FL 36.58 182 80
175 Providence, RI 36.18 132 178
176 Baltimore, MD 34.91 108 181
177 Bridgeport, CT 34.24 180 128
178 Huntington, WV 33.95 153 180
179 New Haven, CT 32.39 173 174
180 Cleveland, OH 32.28 170 175
181 Memphis, TN 32.18 134 182
182 Detroit, MI 32.09 162 177

Peoria as quality of life #1 must be from someone who has not spent a summer there.  I was in Phoenix a few weeks ago with a high of 116. No one was out.  I went to a restaurant that had AC set at low 70s but it was 88 degrees because the AC could not keep up.   No matter what else Peoria offers, it would not score close to #1 with me based on the summer heat.  

Account Closed Is the hypothesis of the article that demand will increase over time in places that have high quality of life and better affordability?  Seems like a reasonable hypothesis.

For the rental business case, the supply side is equally important - would be interesting to see someone's data analysis on where housing supply is least likely to increase.  Combine the two together and it'd be an interesting list of markets to target for investing.

Originally posted by @Dan Heuschele :

Peoria as quality of life #1 must be from someone who has not spent a summer there.  I was in Phoenix a few weeks ago with a high of 116. No one was out.  I went to a restaurant that had AC set at low 70s but it was 88 degrees because the AC could not keep up.   No matter what else Peoria offers, it would not score close to #1 with me based on the summer heat.  

 Well, take into consideration that for most of the year the Phoenix AZ area is like what summer is, everywhere else, about 80 degrees. Thats 'very appealing when people are fighting the cold in the northeast and midwest, and it's golfing weather in Phoenix. Scottsdale of course has more world class resorts that anywhere else in the country and it is a well run city with some of the best schools in the country. ASU is a good, solid university and the area has lots and lots of spring training baseball etc. It's not perfect, no place is, but of the choices available it should rank very high on the list.

Phoenix doesn't have hurricanes like the deep south and the east coast. There are no earthquakes like California and Washington. Property taxes are low. There is a lot of room to grow and government isn't nearly as restrictive as most places. Within a few hours you can be downhill skiing in the winter or at the California beaches playing in the surf.

A lot of high tech is opening shop in Tempe and Chandler (near Phoenix) and housing is more affordable than other successful cities. It's a good place to live and a great place to invest.

Originally posted by @Justin R. :

@Mike M. Is the hypothesis of the article that demand will increase over time in places that have high quality of life and better affordability?  Seems like a reasonable hypothesis.

For the rental business case, the supply side is equally important - would be interesting to see someone's data analysis on where housing supply is least likely to increase.  Combine the two together and it'd be an interesting list of markets to target for investing.

 I think you are correct. It's likely that there will be ebb and flow in various markets, but I think places like Detroit and Cleveland etc have an uphill battle trying too regain former glory. It could be done, but my investing timeline doesn't allow for the hope that someday, they will get their act together. I look at where the likelihood of growth over the next couple of years will take place. 

I know it is popular right now to buy in low cost neighborhoods in the midwest, but that isn't for me. I buy in neighborhoods your wife can walk down the street and feel safe with your kids in tow.

Originally posted by Account Closed:
Originally posted by @Dan Heuschele:

Peoria as quality of life #1 must be from someone who has not spent a summer there.  I was in Phoenix a few weeks ago with a high of 116. No one was out.  I went to a restaurant that had AC set at low 70s but it was 88 degrees because the AC could not keep up.   No matter what else Peoria offers, it would not score close to #1 with me based on the summer heat.  

 Well, take into consideration that for most of the year the Phoenix AZ area is like what summer is, everywhere else, about 80 degrees. Thats 'very appealing when people are fighting the cold in the northeast and midwest, and it's golfing weather in Phoenix. Scottsdale of course has more world class resorts that anywhere else in the country and it is a well run city with some of the best schools in the country. ASU is a good, solid university and the area has lots and lots of spring training baseball etc. It's not perfect, no place is, but of the choices available it should rank very high on the list.

Phoenix doesn't have hurricanes like the deep south and the east coast. There are no earthquakes like California and Washington. Property taxes are low. There is a lot of room to grow and government isn't nearly as restrictive as most places. Within a few hours you can be downhill skiing in the winter or at the California beaches playing in the surf.

A lot of high tech is opening shop in Tempe and Chandler (near Phoenix) and housing is more affordable than other successful cities. It's a good place to live and a great place to invest.

 No place is perfect but I go to Arizona too often in the summer and I cannot handle the heat in the low elevation cities in the summer.   By the way, Peoria average high for July is listed as 104 and for Phoenix 106. Too hot for me to have Peoria as #1 in quality of life no matter what else it offers.  As I indicated a few weeks ago I was in Phoenix with a high of 116 degrees.  I suspect Peoria was similar.  In addition, where I live the temp drops at night due to proximity with ocean (especially when not humid).  In Phoenix it was still 106 degrees shortly before midnight on the day that was 116 degrees. 

As for California, the earthquakes do not scare me but the fires do.  In recent years there has been many more deaths and destruction from fires than earthquakes in California.  In addition, deaths from earthquakes per capita have been falling.  Fires have been getting worse.   I have needed to evacuate twice for fires and have had evacuate others many times.  

Also there are too many people for my liking in San Diego and the cost of living is high.  So I realize San Diego is not perfect but I personally can not handle the summer heat of the low elevation Arizona cities.  

Originally posted by @Dan Heuschele :
Originally posted by @Mike M.:
Originally posted by @Dan Heuschele:

Peoria as quality of life #1 must be from someone who has not spent a summer there.  I was in Phoenix a few weeks ago with a high of 116. No one was out.  I went to a restaurant that had AC set at low 70s but it was 88 degrees because the AC could not keep up.   No matter what else Peoria offers, it would not score close to #1 with me based on the summer heat.  

 Well, take into consideration that for most of the year the Phoenix AZ area is like what summer is, everywhere else, about 80 degrees. Thats 'very appealing when people are fighting the cold in the northeast and midwest, and it's golfing weather in Phoenix. Scottsdale of course has more world class resorts that anywhere else in the country and it is a well run city with some of the best schools in the country. ASU is a good, solid university and the area has lots and lots of spring training baseball etc. It's not perfect, no place is, but of the choices available it should rank very high on the list.

Phoenix doesn't have hurricanes like the deep south and the east coast. There are no earthquakes like California and Washington. Property taxes are low. There is a lot of room to grow and government isn't nearly as restrictive as most places. Within a few hours you can be downhill skiing in the winter or at the California beaches playing in the surf.

A lot of high tech is opening shop in Tempe and Chandler (near Phoenix) and housing is more affordable than other successful cities. It's a good place to live and a great place to invest.

 No place is perfect but I go to Arizona too often in the summer and I cannot handle the heat in the low elevation cities in the summer.   By the way, Peoria average high for July is listed as 104 and for Phoenix 106. Too hot for me to have Peoria as #1 in quality of life no matter what else it offers.  As I indicated a few weeks ago I was in Phoenix with a high of 116 degrees.  I suspect Peoria was similar.  In addition, where I live the temp drops at night due to proximity with ocean (especially when not humid).  In Phoenix it was still 106 degrees shortly before midnight on the day that was 116 degrees. 

As for California, the earthquakes do not scare me but the fires do.  In recent years there has been many more deaths and destruction from fires than earthquakes in California.  In addition, deaths from earthquakes per capita have been falling.  Fires have been getting worse.   I have needed to evacuate twice for fires and have had evacuate others many times.  

Also there are too many people for my liking in San Diego and the cost of living is high.  So I realize San Diego is not perfect but I personally can not handle the summer heat of the low elevation Arizona cities.  

 I like San Diego a lot. We looked at La Jolla to move to originally but decided that in the event of an emergency like a big 'quake there would be nowhere to go. Freeways would be jammed or down. I didn't even think about the fires. Good point. I liken it to hurricane Katrina and New Orleans, a lot of people tried to leave but cars that ran out of gas and numerous auto accidents blocked the freeways. Stores ran out of food and gas stations ran out of gas. The images of the hoards of people in the Louisiana Superdome for weeks with clogged toilets and nowhere to go, didn't sit well. I can only imagine the conditions. Third world. At least in Phoenix when the big one hits in So. Cal. I can be on the road and halfway to Texas before the masses that can travel make it from Riverside & Temecula to Phoenix and overwhelm the services here. ;-)

Cleveland has world-class: orchestra, theater, museums, heath-care ( Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals ), top-ranked universities/colleges (Case Western Reserve, Cleveland Institute of Art), multiple Fortune 500 companies. And I live here and invest here. And do well here. My point to all of this is that you have to look beyond the rankings, beyond the statistics, and really dig into an area to understand it. #DefendTheLand

Originally posted by @Account Closed :
Originally posted by @Dan Heuschele:
Originally posted by @Mike M.:
Originally posted by @Dan Heuschele:

Peoria as quality of life #1 must be from someone who has not spent a summer there.  I was in Phoenix a few weeks ago with a high of 116. No one was out.  I went to a restaurant that had AC set at low 70s but it was 88 degrees because the AC could not keep up.   No matter what else Peoria offers, it would not score close to #1 with me based on the summer heat.  

 Well, take into consideration that for most of the year the Phoenix AZ area is like what summer is, everywhere else, about 80 degrees. Thats 'very appealing when people are fighting the cold in the northeast and midwest, and it's golfing weather in Phoenix. Scottsdale of course has more world class resorts that anywhere else in the country and it is a well run city with some of the best schools in the country. ASU is a good, solid university and the area has lots and lots of spring training baseball etc. It's not perfect, no place is, but of the choices available it should rank very high on the list.

Phoenix doesn't have hurricanes like the deep south and the east coast. There are no earthquakes like California and Washington. Property taxes are low. There is a lot of room to grow and government isn't nearly as restrictive as most places. Within a few hours you can be downhill skiing in the winter or at the California beaches playing in the surf.

A lot of high tech is opening shop in Tempe and Chandler (near Phoenix) and housing is more affordable than other successful cities. It's a good place to live and a great place to invest.

 No place is perfect but I go to Arizona too often in the summer and I cannot handle the heat in the low elevation cities in the summer.   By the way, Peoria average high for July is listed as 104 and for Phoenix 106. Too hot for me to have Peoria as #1 in quality of life no matter what else it offers.  As I indicated a few weeks ago I was in Phoenix with a high of 116 degrees.  I suspect Peoria was similar.  In addition, where I live the temp drops at night due to proximity with ocean (especially when not humid).  In Phoenix it was still 106 degrees shortly before midnight on the day that was 116 degrees. 

As for California, the earthquakes do not scare me but the fires do.  In recent years there has been many more deaths and destruction from fires than earthquakes in California.  In addition, deaths from earthquakes per capita have been falling.  Fires have been getting worse.   I have needed to evacuate twice for fires and have had evacuate others many times.  

Also there are too many people for my liking in San Diego and the cost of living is high.  So I realize San Diego is not perfect but I personally can not handle the summer heat of the low elevation Arizona cities.  

 I like San Diego a lot. We looked at La Jolla to move to originally but decided that in the event of an emergency like a big 'quake there would be nowhere to go. Freeways would be jammed or down. I didn't even think about the fires. Good point. I liken it to hurricane Katrina and New Orleans, a lot of people tried to leave but cars that ran out of gas and numerous auto accidents blocked the freeways. Stores ran out of food and gas stations ran out of gas. The images of the hoards of people in the Louisiana Superdome for weeks with clogged toilets and nowhere to go, didn't sit well. I can only imagine the conditions. Third world. At least in Phoenix when the big one hits in So. Cal. I can be on the road and halfway to Texas before the masses that can travel make it from Riverside & Temecula to Phoenix and overwhelm the services here. ;-)

For the fire evacuations, the surface roads to get out were more impacted than the freeways.  Emergency crews trying to get in as everyone is trying to get out.  Once we got to the freeway it was an improvement as they are made to handle a lot of vehicles and virtually the only ones on the freeway in the evacuation areas were the emergency vehicles and those evacuating.

La Jolla has a bad traffic bottleneck even without an emergency.  Limited access routes in/out of La Jolla.  A bit like Coronado but not quite as bad.  I could not imagine trying to get out of La Jolla (or Coronado) if all of the residents were to be evacuated at the same time.

Originally posted by @Dulcey Barr :

Cleveland has world-class: orchestra, theater, museums, heath-care ( Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals ), top-ranked universities/colleges (Case Western Reserve, Cleveland Institute of Art), multiple Fortune 500 companies. And I live here and invest here. And do well here. My point to all of this is that you have to look beyond the rankings, beyond the statistics, and really dig into an area to understand it. #DefendTheLand

 I applaud you taking and occupying the land. Someone needs to gentrify the place and you may as well make your fortune doing so.

I wonder what they base their rankings on... While I've never lived in Phoenix I find it hard to believe that Tucson has a lower affordability rating than Tempe, Scottsdale or Phoenix proper. The median income and availability of rentals notwithstanding I have yet to meet anyone who considers the major Phoenix metros to be low-cost relative to any other city in Arizona.

Further, and this is just my opinion mind you, but the summers aren't as bad as they seem out here. People just hibernate in air conditioned buildings or simply travel through the summer... I have friends all over the country complaining about 100+ degree heat indexes this time of the year and they deal with the specific unpleasantness of humidity on top of 90+ degree days. Our summers are long and exhausting, but our winters are perfect and last for 6 months. #worthit

For anyone wondering how they determined these rankings, the full article is here:

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-cities-for-renters/...

Quality of Life – Total Points: 40

City Satisfaction Ranking: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Job Market: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub's "Best & Worst Cities for Jobs" ranking.

Driver-Friendliness: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities to Drive in” ranking.

Recreation-Friendliness: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities for Recreation” ranking.

Weather: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Cities with the Best & Worst Weather” ranking.

Quality of Public School System: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on GreatSchools.org’s ratings of U.S. public school systems.

Safety: Double Weight (~11.43 Points)

Note: This metric measures the violent- and property-crime rates.

Presence of State Bedbug Laws: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This binary metric measures the presence or absence of bedbug laws in the state. Bedbug laws address bedbug infestations in rental properties.

Originally posted by @Wes Blackwell :

For anyone wondering how they determined these rankings, the full article is here:

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-cities-for-renters/...

Quality of Life – Total Points: 40

City Satisfaction Ranking: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Job Market: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub's "Best & Worst Cities for Jobs" ranking.

Driver-Friendliness: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities to Drive in” ranking.

Recreation-Friendliness: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities for Recreation” ranking.

Weather: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Cities with the Best & Worst Weather” ranking.

Quality of Public School System: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on GreatSchools.org’s ratings of U.S. public school systems.

Safety: Double Weight (~11.43 Points)

Note: This metric measures the violent- and property-crime rates.

Presence of State Bedbug Laws: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This binary metric measures the presence or absence of bedbug laws in the state. Bedbug laws address bedbug infestations in rental properties.

What make wallethub such an authority? And Bedbug laws are a factor in their formula? Ridiculous - a good landlord does not need a law to have them do the proper thing with pest management.

Originally posted by @Steve Babiak :
Originally posted by @Wes Blackwell:

For anyone wondering how they determined these rankings, the full article is here:

https://wallethub.com/edu/best-cities-for-renters/...

Quality of Life – Total Points: 40

City Satisfaction Ranking: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Job Market: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities for Jobs” ranking.

Driver-Friendliness: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities to Drive in” ranking.

Recreation-Friendliness: Full Weight (~5.71 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Best & Worst Cities for Recreation” ranking.

Weather: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on WalletHub’s “Cities with the Best & Worst Weather” ranking.

Quality of Public School System: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This metric is based on GreatSchools.org’s ratings of U.S. public school systems.

Safety: Double Weight (~11.43 Points)

Note: This metric measures the violent- and property-crime rates.

Presence of State Bedbug Laws: Half Weight (~2.86 Points)

Note: This binary metric measures the presence or absence of bedbug laws in the state. Bedbug laws address bedbug infestations in rental properties.

What make wallethub such an authority? And Bedbug laws are a factor in their formula? Ridiculous - a good landlord does not need a law to have them do the proper thing with pest management.

WalletHub doesn't need to be an authority. They want to be an "influencer". And it is likely that a whole lot of WalletHub readers will take their advice without going into the specifics. I believe it's a good idea to understand what people believe as well as what is "right". You won't do as well doing only what is "right" in your own eyes. Look for market trends and you'll become wealthy if you employ the information.