Sellers agent - a need or a rip-off ?

82 Replies

Lately I have started to list my properties by myself. When saying by myself I mean either a flat fee service or using a realtor that his name is on the listing but my number and email are there and all communications are going to/through me. I have stated 3% going to the buyers agent of course, but for some reason I feel like this kind of listings are slower (all though the mechanism is the same and the exposure is the same as if I had a sellers agent). What led me to decide to do that was the feeing that a 3% for seller agent is going mainly to put it on the market with a lockbox and most of the job later would be of the buyers agents who actually going and showing etc. Needles to say once there is a contract the communication is mainly with the title co and scheduling inspection/appraisal if needed and that’s it. I just couldn’t understand the sellers agent part. Do you believe or think that buyers agents trying to avoid showing and dealing with direct seller? I’ve been told that a lot of them don’t want to “deal” with someone who might be emotionally invested in the transaction... Thanks for your thoughts - great community
Originally posted by @Shalom Afraimian :
Lately I have started to list my properties by myself. When saying by myself I mean either a flat fee service or using a realtor that his name is on the listing but my number and email are there and all communications are going to/through me.

I have stated 3% going to the buyers agent of course, but for some reason I feel like this kind of listings are slower (all though the mechanism is the same and the exposure is the same as if I had a sellers agent).

What led me to decide to do that was the feeing that a 3% for seller agent is going mainly to put it on the market with a lockbox and most of the job later would be of the buyers agents who actually going and showing etc.

Needles to say once there is a contract the communication is mainly with the title co and scheduling inspection/appraisal if needed and that’s it. I just couldn’t understand the sellers agent part.

Do you believe or think that buyers agents trying to avoid showing and dealing with direct seller? I’ve been told that a lot of them don’t want to “deal” with someone who might be emotionally invested in the transaction...

Thanks for your thoughts - great community

 Depends on your market. If there are a lot of houses to choose from, it *could* slow things down for you, however if there is a shortage of inventory probably not an issue. Do you have a fair price (from comps, etc)

More importantly, people don't want the owner to be present when they are viewing the property. Also, during negotiations the owner tends to be more emotional about the property than an agent would be. Interest rates just went up so fewer people now qualify for buying a house.

There are a lot of ways to market a house, make sure you are using the ones that are appropriate for the market you are in.

If the decision is between doing it yourself or hiring a bad agent, of course do it yourself. If the choice is between yourself and a good agent, then it depends on your skill level. There is a reason why top agents are able to sell properties for more money than some guy who sells 2 or 3 houses per year. Any monkey can put it on the mls, and sometimes thats enough. But there is a reason why some properties sit on the market for months while others sell in days for the same price and in the same location. 

There is also the liability issue. While I wouldnt do this to a fsbo, I do do it to the discount agents or agents I dont like.....I negotiate them so hard, and I get them on every single regulation they and their seller screwed up on. I closed a deal earlier this year and brought up an issue at the closing table that ended with that seller writing a $15k check to my buyers because they didnt disclose a particular issue that they were not aware the law required them to disclose but I was aware. I got a lot of referrals from my buyer off of that. That was almost his entire down payment returned to him because that agent and seller didnt know what they were doing.

market specific but if you really want to go that route  simply put 4% for the BAC  that gets agents attention 

and on tougher ones i will put the full 6% to the buyers agent those deals get sold in a matter of hours.. 

but i list them myself.. but plat rate same thing applies  and just depends on the current market conditions in your market. 

HI @Shalom Afraimian ,

Welcome!

Generally speaking I recommend listing with an agent. They spend their day marketing and handling your property. They have insurance to cover mistakes and they know the customs and contracts. Of course if you are willing to put in the time and know the material then my answer is the same as "Should I hire a painter" (Personally I do after my bullheaded self kept looking at that one spot on the ceiling and the lousy edges for years). 

To answer the "He's an agent of course he thinks you should hire one point. I am buyers agent as well so I do like working with FSBO buyers because honestly I know the contracts and customs so it's not like I am making one more cent if you hire a top notch agent or handle the contracts yourself. From my side it's often easier to deal with someone who sells 2 a year and owns the place, than if you put me in the ring with Mohammad Ali (there is no money difference to me on who I deal with).

I do get to disagree with @Jay Hinrichs on this one which is not often. Offering 6% to the buyers agent and doing it yourself is hiring someone for 6% to represent the buyer and specifically beat you up on price/terms and find every reason to beat you down. Normally you would pay 3% for a protector and 3% for someone to beat you up. It's like you are just paying to get beat up. Now of course Jay has more experience than most and well his wife is still going to represent him eitherway sooooo,

If your good at marketing do it yourself, if you bought it though an agent have them sell it. Although if someone tried to get me for 15,000 at closing I’d give them the deposit back and tell them to have a great day! You do a good job a house will always sell!

Originally posted by @Keith Lyons :

If your good at marketing do it yourself, if you bought it though an agent have them sell it. Although if someone tried to get me for 15,000 at closing I’d give them the deposit back and tell them to have a great day! You do a good job a house will always sell!

This wasnt an issue the seller could back out of. They violated a state law that had by law a certain monetary amount attached to it. The $15k at closing was what my client was willing to take for a $20k issue, that the court would have ordered. If they had not paid it then, wed simply had filed the appropriate form the next day and the state would lien their bank account for the payment. 

I will also add, that seller and agent were complete a holes, which is why I didnt mijd sticking it to them 

Originally posted by @Mike Cumbie :

HI @Shalom Afraimian ,

Welcome!

Generally speaking I recommend listing with an agent. They spend their day marketing and handling your property. They have insurance to cover mistakes and they know the customs and contracts. Of course if you are willing to put in the time and know the material then my answer is the same as "Should I hire a painter" (Personally I do after my bullheaded self kept looking at that one spot on the ceiling and the lousy edges for years). 

To answer the "He's an agent of course he thinks you should hire one point. I am buyers agent as well so I do like working with FSBO buyers because honestly I know the contracts and customs so it's not like I am making one more cent if you hire a top notch agent or handle the contracts yourself. From my side it's often easier to deal with someone who sells 2 a year and owns the place, than if you put me in the ring with Mohammad Ali (there is no money difference to me on who I deal with).

I do get to disagree with @Jay Hinrichs on this one which is not often. Offering 6% to the buyers agent and doing it yourself is hiring someone for 6% to represent the buyer and specifically beat you up on price/terms and find every reason to beat you down. Normally you would pay 3% for a protector and 3% for someone to beat you up. It's like you are just paying to get beat up. Now of course Jay has more experience than most and well his wife is still going to represent him eitherway sooooo,

 this is what I did during and right after the GFC  when sales were hard to come by.. it worked.. in todays market not necessary most of time ..  However if I had a hard to sell prop I would pull that out of the quiver 

Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs :
Originally posted by @Mike Cumbie:

HI @Shalom Afraimian ,

Welcome!

Generally speaking I recommend listing with an agent. They spend their day marketing and handling your property. They have insurance to cover mistakes and they know the customs and contracts. Of course if you are willing to put in the time and know the material then my answer is the same as "Should I hire a painter" (Personally I do after my bullheaded self kept looking at that one spot on the ceiling and the lousy edges for years). 

To answer the "He's an agent of course he thinks you should hire one point. I am buyers agent as well so I do like working with FSBO buyers because honestly I know the contracts and customs so it's not like I am making one more cent if you hire a top notch agent or handle the contracts yourself. From my side it's often easier to deal with someone who sells 2 a year and owns the place, than if you put me in the ring with Mohammad Ali (there is no money difference to me on who I deal with).

I do get to disagree with @Jay Hinrichs on this one which is not often. Offering 6% to the buyers agent and doing it yourself is hiring someone for 6% to represent the buyer and specifically beat you up on price/terms and find every reason to beat you down. Normally you would pay 3% for a protector and 3% for someone to beat you up. It's like you are just paying to get beat up. Now of course Jay has more experience than most and well his wife is still going to represent him eitherway sooooo,

 this is what I did during and right after the GFC  when sales were hard to come by.. it worked.. in todays market not necessary most of time ..  However if I had a hard to sell prop I would pull that out of the quiver 

 Ive done it. Never gone to 6%, but as high as 4.5% on a hard to sell property. Send out an email blast with that and the property flies off the market. I think a much better use of money throwing an extra 1 or 2% on the buyers agent than do a price drop of an equal amount.

Originally posted by @Russell Brazil :
Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs:
Originally posted by @Mike Cumbie:

HI @Shalom Afraimian ,

Welcome!

Generally speaking I recommend listing with an agent. They spend their day marketing and handling your property. They have insurance to cover mistakes and they know the customs and contracts. Of course if you are willing to put in the time and know the material then my answer is the same as "Should I hire a painter" (Personally I do after my bullheaded self kept looking at that one spot on the ceiling and the lousy edges for years). 

To answer the "He's an agent of course he thinks you should hire one point. I am buyers agent as well so I do like working with FSBO buyers because honestly I know the contracts and customs so it's not like I am making one more cent if you hire a top notch agent or handle the contracts yourself. From my side it's often easier to deal with someone who sells 2 a year and owns the place, than if you put me in the ring with Mohammad Ali (there is no money difference to me on who I deal with).

I do get to disagree with @Jay Hinrichs on this one which is not often. Offering 6% to the buyers agent and doing it yourself is hiring someone for 6% to represent the buyer and specifically beat you up on price/terms and find every reason to beat you down. Normally you would pay 3% for a protector and 3% for someone to beat you up. It's like you are just paying to get beat up. Now of course Jay has more experience than most and well his wife is still going to represent him eitherway sooooo,

 this is what I did during and right after the GFC  when sales were hard to come by.. it worked.. in todays market not necessary most of time ..  However if I had a hard to sell prop I would pull that out of the quiver 

 Ive done it. Never gone to 6%, but as high as 4.5% on a hard to sell property. Send out an email blast with that and the property flies off the market. I think a much better use of money throwing an extra 1 or 2% on the buyers agent than do a price drop of an equal amount.

Also Russell these are our personal properties.. But my wife often makes deals if its a listing and she is selling them a new house or if she double ends it..  she is pretty generous that way.. however she is retail not an investor agent.. its a different business as we all know.

@Shalom Afraimian You have to keep in mind that the Realtor Association is essentially a cartel. They will more often than not ignore your property if it's listed with a flat fee or 'discount' broker, just to stick it to a fellow licensee that they see as not playing by the rules.

@Jay Hinrichs recommendation is 100% correct. You have to play on buyer's agent's greed to get them to break from the ranks. That way when the other agents in their office dog them for cooperating with the flat fee riff-raff, they can brag that they made extra $$$, and they'll see them when they get back from their trip to Paris.

It's not right, it's probably illegal, but it happens to be the system we have to work with. Unless of course you want to just sell the house FSBO, if you know what you're doing you can sell the house faster and for more money than any agent can anyway.

Originally posted by @Russell Brazil :
Originally posted by @Keith Lyons:

If your good at marketing do it yourself, if you bought it though an agent have them sell it. Although if someone tried to get me for 15,000 at closing I’d give them the deposit back and tell them to have a great day! You do a good job a house will always sell!

This wasnt an issue the seller could back out of. They violated a state law that had by law a certain monetary amount attached to it. The $15k at closing was what my client was willing to take for a $20k issue, that the court would have ordered. If they had not paid it then, wed simply had filed the appropriate form the next day and the state would lien their bank account for the payment. 

I will also add, that seller and agent were complete a holes, which is why I didnt mijd sticking it to them 

 What was the issue/law they violated? You can pm me directly if you don't feel comfortable disclosing in on the public forum

Originally posted by @Chris C. :
Originally posted by @Russell Brazil:
Originally posted by @Keith Lyons:

If your good at marketing do it yourself, if you bought it though an agent have them sell it. Although if someone tried to get me for 15,000 at closing I’d give them the deposit back and tell them to have a great day! You do a good job a house will always sell!

This wasnt an issue the seller could back out of. They violated a state law that had by law a certain monetary amount attached to it. The $15k at closing was what my client was willing to take for a $20k issue, that the court would have ordered. If they had not paid it then, wed simply had filed the appropriate form the next day and the state would lien their bank account for the payment. 

I will also add, that seller and agent were complete a holes, which is why I didnt mijd sticking it to them 

 What was the issue/law they violated? You can pm me directly if you don't feel comfortable disclosing in on the public forum

 So in Maryland, most houses built after 1990 have water and sewer lines that were put into the community by the builder and not by the government. (Most, not all). Then the builder rolled the costs of these items into bonds and sold them to third party companies that created annuities for them so the builders could recoup those costs, and investors could get an annuity from them.  A fee then is charged to every homeowner in these communities yearly, with the typical fee being $750 per year per condo, $1000 per year for a townhouse and $1500 per year for a single family, and those are paid for 30 years. (Times and prices can vary greatly, those are just typical fees).

The amount of this payment, and how long remains of these payments to be disclosed to the buyer of a property and how long is remaining on the payments. Makes sense right, an extra $100 a month is significant for most people, so then they can make a completely formed opinion on whether they want to buy the house with these costs involved.  When these are not disclosed, the seller then is required to by law pay off the entirety of the remaining payments on this bond. This can be as high as $45,000 if there are 30 years left at $1500 per year.  

There also is no recourse for fighting this if it was not disclosed.  The buyer of the property can come back at any time post closing to demand the payment, and it is fairly easy to get this done because the law has no ambiguity in it.  No disclosure, you owe the money, and the state is very serious about it's enforcement of this.

In fact the amount of agents who are not familiar with this law is absolutely staggering, as I think this is one of the most serious issues an agent should be guarding their client against because of the large sums of number that could be at stake with the issue.  There is one large brokerage in the area who I have yet to see this fee disclosed on any of their paper work at all on applicable properties.

There is also no public database of the information because this debt is privately owned.  Good experienced agents in the area simply know from experience which neighborhoods are likely affected, so we make sure we find out the information to disclose properly.

Originally posted by : @Doug Pretorius

You have to keep in mind that the Realtor Association is essentially a cartel. They will more often than not ignore your property if it's listed with a flat fee or 'discount' broker, just to stick it to a fellow licensee that they see as not playing by the rules

I have never seen the slightest evidence of that and if you have, I'd love to see it. 

As for me - and every other agent I know - I will gladly present offers and negotiate directly with a seller or on an "entry only" property.

My motivation and fiduciary duty is to help my clients to get the property that they want.  It's also how I put food on my table.

Do you really think that I'll blackball or refuse to show a property that my client wants to see?  That I'd intentionally walk away from a paycheck in order to punish a flat-fee broker?

I get that you hate Realtors, but you're making some pretty heavy assertions of malfeasance that I doubt you can back up.

@Charlie MacPherson not only is it not true that they are blackballed like you point out , but discount agents are typically Realtors themselves...so do they boycott their own listings then? lol

I, and I know several other agents actually target these listings to make offers because we know we can get better deals on them because the person we are negotiating with has little to no negotiation experience.  I was recently asked by someone at a party, they said "You must hate X Brokerage?" My reply was, No I actually love them. I get great deals from them since they usually have no clue what they are doing and Im able to negotiate them harder than someone who knows what they were doing.  When I negotiate a home inspection subsidy, I typically get triple from them what I get when I negotiate against a top agent.  Seller in those instances though are about even I guess, your saving X dollars on the commission, but then giving X dollars back to the buyer on the home inspection.

The real damage is when they misprice the properties. (Actually its typically the seller mispricing). Heck I and plenty of other agents have done that on our own properties. That is one of the reasons I stopped listing my own properties. I have a buddy do it, and let him price it, and vice versa, I list his properties without him giving input to the price. Stops ourselves from making the same mistakes so many sellers make. (And has then the added benefit of not worrying about the E&O not covering the transaction)

Originally posted by @Doug Pretorius :

@Shalom Afraimian You have to keep in mind that the Realtor Association is essentially a cartel. They will more often than not ignore your property if it's listed with a flat fee or 'discount' broker, just to stick it to a fellow licensee that they see as not playing by the rules.

@Jay Hinrichs recommendation is 100% correct. You have to play on buyer's agent's greed to get them to break from the ranks. That way when the other agents in their office dog them for cooperating with the flat fee riff-raff, they can brag that they made extra $$$, and they'll see them when they get back from their trip to Paris.

It's not right, it's probably illegal, but it happens to be the system we have to work with. Unless of course you want to just sell the house FSBO, if you know what you're doing you can sell the house faster and for more money than any agent can anyway.

In our neck of the woods commissions are negotiable up or down.. nothing illegal at all about it.. for land sales I routinely charged 10 to 20% commissions..  

Originally posted by @Russell Brazil :
Originally posted by @Chris Connolly:
Originally posted by @Russell Brazil:
Originally posted by @Keith Lyons:

If your good at marketing do it yourself, if you bought it though an agent have them sell it. Although if someone tried to get me for 15,000 at closing I’d give them the deposit back and tell them to have a great day! You do a good job a house will always sell!

This wasnt an issue the seller could back out of. They violated a state law that had by law a certain monetary amount attached to it. The $15k at closing was what my client was willing to take for a $20k issue, that the court would have ordered. If they had not paid it then, wed simply had filed the appropriate form the next day and the state would lien their bank account for the payment. 

I will also add, that seller and agent were complete a holes, which is why I didnt mijd sticking it to them 

 What was the issue/law they violated? You can pm me directly if you don't feel comfortable disclosing in on the public forum

 So in Maryland, most houses built after 1990 have water and sewer lines that were put into the community by the builder and not by the government. (Most, not all). Then the builder rolled the costs of these items into bonds and sold them to third party companies that created annuities for them so the builders could recoup those costs, and investors could get an annuity from them.  A fee then is charged to every homeowner in these communities yearly, with the typical fee being $750 per year per condo, $1000 per year for a townhouse and $1500 per year for a single family, and those are paid for 30 years. (Times and prices can vary greatly, those are just typical fees).

The amount of this payment, and how long remains of these payments to be disclosed to the buyer of a property and how long is remaining on the payments. Makes sense right, an extra $100 a month is significant for most people, so then they can make a completely formed opinion on whether they want to buy the house with these costs involved.  When these are not disclosed, the seller then is required to by law pay off the entirety of the remaining payments on this bond. This can be as high as $45,000 if there are 30 years left at $1500 per year.  

There also is no recourse for fighting this if it was not disclosed.  The buyer of the property can come back at any time post closing to demand the payment, and it is fairly easy to get this done because the law has no ambiguity in it.  No disclosure, you owe the money, and the state is very serious about it's enforcement of this.

In fact the amount of agents who are not familiar with this law is absolutely staggering, as I think this is one of the most serious issues an agent should be guarding their client against because of the large sums of number that could be at stake with the issue.  There is one large brokerage in the area who I have yet to see this fee disclosed on any of their paper work at all on applicable properties.

There is also no public database of the information because this debt is privately owned.  Good experienced agents in the area simply know from experience which neighborhoods are likely affected, so we make sure we find out the information to disclose properly.

Russell this is what makes a site like BP so dangerous to some.. real estate is highly regional.. the bonds your talking about out west would be Mello roos bonds or 1915 act bonds or 1911 act.. I have used all three to develop my subdivisions.. the major difference is that a title commitment preliminary title report picks this up as a matter of course.. no way this goes un detected.. Lenders simply would not stand for it.. and of course title companies would have issues not disclosing encumbrances.. so pretty standard in our areas to know about these and since the buyers have to sign that they read and understood their title commitment / preliminary title report.. there is no agent or seller liability in this issue.. as I stated this simply would not fall through the crack just like if you have an HOA its clearly denoted on the prelim or title commitment ..

Originally posted by @Charlie MacPherson :
Originally posted by : @Doug Pretorius

You have to keep in mind that the Realtor Association is essentially a cartel. They will more often than not ignore your property if it's listed with a flat fee or 'discount' broker, just to stick it to a fellow licensee that they see as not playing by the rules

I have never seen the slightest evidence of that and if you have, I'd love to see it. 

As for me - and every other agent I know - I will gladly present offers and negotiate directly with a seller or on an "entry only" property.

My motivation and fiduciary duty is to help my clients to get the property that they want.  It's also how I put food on my table.

Do you really think that I'll blackball or refuse to show a property that my client wants to see?  That I'd intentionally walk away from a paycheck in order to punish a flat-fee broker?

I get that you hate Realtors, but you're making some pretty heavy assertions of malfeasance that I doubt you can back up.

I think what civilians who really don't know how brokerage today works.. don't understand.. brokers don't tell people what to buy.. Buyers find their stuff on the internet or MLS feed and tell the broker what they want to offer on.. the day of this info being the sole property of brokers in the MLS listing book went the way of the dodo bird decades ago... the brokers representing buyers and making offers on falt fee broker listed properties are making what they normally make.. now granted there is some company in Denver that was putting up listing for a total of 3k both sides not sure if they are still in business.. but it was a disrupter for sure. and no one can stay in business sharing 3k a file.. NO one.

This is a case by case scenario. It would depend on how good the listing agent is, how good your are at marketing, what the market is like, etc.... If you can list yourself and get good results then go that route, if your results suffer then you probably needed that agent. Assuming that all a listing agent does is submit to the mls is short sighted. If that is all a listing agent is doing for you then you should interview some new agents. 

If you are listing your properties on zillow, etc.. yourself and saying that you will cooperate with agents then agents will bring you a buyer, but probably only if the buyer finds the property and requests it. Agents also know that dealing directly with the seller when you are a listing agent is typically a hassle. The owners don't take criticism of their properties well, and typically don't know the local customs, laws and rules so a transaction with them is typically more work for the selling agent. I am not saying this applies to you, but if this is the general feeling then it may hurt you even if you would be excellent to deal with. 

The other side of this is agents frequently have people try and reduce or not pay their fee once the transaction is settling. In most cases the agreement that gets agents paid is the one that brokerages sign with the mls. If you aren't listing on the mls there can be fear that they will lose out. 

I personally don't have these issues and will try and sell anything from mls properties to off market. I don't mind negotiating to make it work, but many agents that I know would rather stay away from things that aren't the traditional sale. 

Hope this helps a little! Good Luck! Aaron

I've enjoyed this discussion and learned from it.  Not always the case at all, so thank you - especially Russell, Mike and Jay.

I'm an outlier like usual. On this matter, when selling rentals, I do it myself.  I've done the stage it, list it, suffer immensely plan and don't like it.  

I've email blasted generous commission carrots to all the local DBs and PMs but have been completely ignored. I try to incentivise the buyers agents and agree with Russell that is generally more effective than a price drop if you're listed.

I use an a la carte model.  I have a good handle on comps and what a good asking price would be if it were listed, then I put it for sale at that minus repairs needed, minus 6%.  The price stands out and generates a lot of interest just from free CL and zillow listings.

In the ad it states if they want me to replace that water heater,  roof, hvac (or any major item I know to be wheezing) ? Add it to the price.  If they want closing cost help? Add it.  If they have a buyers agent? Add it, too.  It will appraise because I'm not asking for the moon.  It's just another rental I'm done playing with but not giving away.

In the end I get a smooth sale.  The after inspection items have been addressed and nobody's taking me to the wood shed.  When expectations are met, everybody goes home happy and I'm good giving that excited first time buyer a fair deal.

@Charlie MacPherson I've both seen it happen and been told about it by agents I know outside of the real estate business. As recently as a month ago an agent my wife knows was complaining that flat fee brokers from Toronto have been "moving in on our territory and despite the efforts of the local agents to resist them, we're losing ground."

This is nothing new though. Discount brokers have been shunned by the full service brokers for as long as I've been involved in real estate.

And for the record, any feelings I have toward realtors has been 100% earned by their actions. It's not like I woke up one day and decided I didn't like them.

@Shalom Afraimian Congrats on selling your deals on your own. You absolutely do not need a Realtor to sell or market your deals, and getting them on MLS for a flat fee is very easy. I have been a Realtor/Broker for almost 30 years (although I do primarily flipping and teaching others now). I sell all my flips in 7 days. I just sold a flip in 4 days, even though the market inventory went from 25 homes for sale nearby, to 91 homes when I listed. I had a lot of competition.

I grew up hearing location, location, location, but that is ridiculous. It's price, price, price.  I can sell any home in any area for the right price.  In addition, I can flip any home in any area and profit if I buy it for the right price.  

I am guessing that your homes are not priced right if they are not selling in a fast enough time. Time is money in flipping. If you are paying on a hard money loan, each day is costing you more. In my area right now, time is your enemy, as prices have been dropping and marketing times are rising.  

Where a really good Realtor can help you, is in pricing it correctly. Unfortunately, I find most Realtors (even very experienced ones) are not that great at comping accurately and moving a home for top-dollar quickly.  They either price too high and it sits, or too low and you lose some of the profit you could have made.  

I don't believe most of your Realtors care that you are not an agent. On my listings, I find the Realtors rarely even read what I write in MLS. I have also helped many FSBO's list their homes or flips and they all sold quickly, as I helped them price it and they have had no problems with other agents showing their homes.

Good Luck!

  

@Doug Pretorius I love your country - my wife and I just did a 3,500 mile trip through Quebec, Labrador, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and back home to Plymouth.  We had a blast and met a lot of very friendly people along the way.

But maybe things are different in Canada when it comes to real estate.  Maybe your Realtors are different than ours.  Maybe the ethics standards are different.

Whatever the explanation, I have never seen or even heard of the things you describe happening around here.  I just don't see myself walking away from a paycheck - from feeding my family - in order to punish a non-standard listing agent.

To the best of my knowledge, those things just don't happen here.

I have done flat fee and had success. I now have an agent doing it and have had some speed bumps. 

I also will be getting my license soon, as a way to help expedite my buying process and possibly even dabble in buying/selling houses for others.

I never experienced anyone shunning my flat fee listings. Most sold in a couple days. If agents didn't show the house to their clients, the only real loser would be that client not seeing a house they may have wanted to buy.