low flow fixtures, to be or not to be...

7 Replies

It's typical in my market to pay for water and sewer. I am considering making an improvement by replacing higher flow plumbing fixtures (toilets, bath and kitchen faucets, shower heads) to improve utility costs. Have any of you made this investment? Did you see an improvement in utility costs? Did you receive any complaints from tenants?

I am looking also to standardize with Moen fixtures that qualify for the EPA's watersense program. Any suggestions or experience with Moen or other watersense qualified fixtures?

Thanks in advance.

I feel like most every decent new fixture is low flow these days. I basically just stick with big name fixtures like Delta and Simmons. The cost for low-flow vs. high flow fixtures is not too enough of a difference in my opinion so go with low flow. I have never had a tenant complain. I do opt to spend more for a Delta faucet or a Simmons shower valve from a plumbing supply house as opposed to some Home Depot Glacier Bay cheapo fixture that you will end up replacing. Delta, Kohler, Simmons, and the like are solid fixtures that you can actually get repair parts for and usually for free from the manufacturer. 

@Rob Beland great comments. I especially like your justifications for buying quality fixtures. Thanks 

Toilets - go for MAX flush power and forget saving the planet in that department. 

Originally posted by @Bryan N. :

Toilets - go for MAX flush power and forget saving the planet in that department. 

 A rather short sighted - both environmentally and economically - view.

Most toilet manufactures submit their models for MAP testing.  There are multiple Hight Efficiency Toilets (HET) and Ultra High Efficiency Toilets (UHET) which rate superior to the water hogs of yesterday.  Volume of water is less important than diameter of the trap and smoothness of the inside surface of your sewer lines.

We have been using a Niagara Conservation 4.2l flapperless toilet (yet another bonus) for close to the past three years ... it rates with a MAP test of 1000 and has less clogging issues than most of the old 5 or 3.5 usg toilets it replaced.  We have two buildings where simply replacing the old toilets with an HET, reduced the water bill by more than 30%.

Medium greenapartmenthires 1024x1024Roy N., Louer Louer Ltd. | 1.506.471.4126

MAX flush power.  If your worried about the planet Google "plastic island"

I want to save the planet as much as the next person. But I REALLY want to cut down on water consumption since I pay the bill. Great advice I will start looking at the Niagara toilet thanks @Roy N.

Originally posted by @Paul Stern :

I want to save the planet as much as the next person. But I REALLY want to cut down on water consumption since I pay the bill. Great advice I will start looking at the Niagara toilet thanks Roy N.

 Paul:

Have a look at models with a MAP rating of 800 - 1000+.  Most manufactures have at least one descent HET or UHET toilet in their line-up.   Home Depot did have a house brand (Glacier Bay) HET that was a rebranded Niagara Conservation (the MAP database indicates which one) that was often available for around $100.

Medium greenapartmenthires 1024x1024Roy N., Louer Louer Ltd. | 1.506.471.4126