New tenants tried the old pet switcheroo

14 Replies

Leased a house to a young couple the other day.  My ad clearly states, no big dogs, no pits, no cats.  The backyard of this house is fenced, but it's not very tall.  When my wife showed them the house they said they had a dog, but his sister was going to keep it for him.    So, they signed the lease, paid the money and started moving in.    Today, they texted my wife that sister couldn't keep the dog, but not to worry it's crate trained and only goes outside on a leash.   And, oh yeah, it's a Great Dane.  

So, I told them in no uncertain terms, NO.   If you try to keep this dog, I'm cancelling the lease immediately, and refunding the money.   They asked if they could pay 100 bucks a month more and I could inspect the house monthly.  Again, I said no, I don't need the extra hassle of every month going to see if this horse has destroyed my house.

I think they thought we would roll over, and I may have when i first started out, but now I've learned better.   I'm almost positive they did this intentionally, because they then asked what kinds of dogs were acceptable as they would have to get a new baby after they get rid of the Great Dane.   

I wouldn't give them a refund of the rent either. They lived there.

I thought about that but told them we would pro rate it.

Our criteria says if they have a disallowed pet, or if they said they had a disallowed pet and are giving it away, they are denied. We have enforced that a few times.

Not to defend them, but Great Danes are considered an apartment dog because they are not very active and don't require a yard to run around in.  They traditionally have bad hips.  So, while they can belly up to your sink to get a drink directly out of the faucet (lol), the chances that they will do much damage to your place is minimal.  They are likely to make more of a dent in the Tenant's furniture while laying on it all day.

A policy is a policy.  If you feel strongly about the big dog policy, then I say stick to your guns.

i believe Great Danes are on the "blacklisted by insurance companies" list. you may wan to check with your insurance carrier. 

from http://www.insurancequotes.org/home/10-dog-breeds-that-drive-up-home-insurance-rates/ : 

7. Great Danes: While not normally regarded by the general public as a dangerous dog, this breed has been responsible for several deaths. Continuously taking the number one ranking of tallest dog alive year after year, Great Danes are kind of like small, wild horses, so it’s no wonder they can do some damage if they act out.

@Cara Lonsdale I'm not taking a chance on a 100 lb dog that can chew up my new countertops without even stretching, not to mention the size of a dog like that's accidents.  We put that policy in place based on past experiences.

I'd rather have a Great Dane in my place than a cocker spaniel. Talk about a nasty temperament.

I think the critical issue here was not the breed/temperament of the dog, but the fact that this landlord clearly stated he had a "no big dog" policy that the tenants were well aware of prior to signing the lease.  Moving forward, I'd be more concerned about this tenant's behavior as opposed to their dog's.

Originally posted by @Roger S. :

@Cara Lonsdale I'm not taking a chance on a 100 lb dog that can chew up my new countertops without even stretching, not to mention the size of a dog like that's accidents.  We put that policy in place based on past experiences.

 Understood. And I agree that if you have a policy in place, you follow it every time. That's the best way to ensure consistency on both sides. 

@Nathan G.   Yeah, we were feeling pretty good about them when they signed, now they are going to have to regain our trust.

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