PEX piping to increase appraisal. Does it matter ?

15 Replies

I am currently doing a rehab on a foreclosure. 1300 sqft SFR. The plumbing on this house is all old galvanized pipes. I got two quotes from plumbers which one is to replace the whole thing with PEX and doing drainage, and the other is to replace from the risers up with PEX. Of course to redo the whole thing costs a lot more than just doing the risers up.

If i plan on doing a refinance on this home(BRRRR) which one should i do ? Could i get away with just doing from the risers up with PEX? This house is outside city limits so no permits needed.

Maugo,

Replacing all plumbing with Pex VS. just replacing from risers up will almost have no bearing on appraised value. If the difference in price isn't astronomical I'd try to replace as much as you can with all the pipes exposed.

You will thank yourself later when you don't have to open a wall to replace galvanized piping that is full of scale and clogged.

Thx,

Chris

@Maugno M. I really like Pex, it is easy to install is resistant to breaking from freezing. I personally don't think any of the plumbing will affect the appraisal. It might help you sell the house since you can indicate that it has been upgraded.

I would do what is necessary but not go overboard.

If you have galvanized, replacing the water line from the street to the house makes a hug improvement on water pressure as galvanized will rust and restrict the flow of water over time.

I believable you just need to have working plumbing with good water pressure for the appraisal.

I would be more worried about plumbing issues or old piping showing up on a buyers inspection than it affecting an appraisal.

Depends on the level of access and the condition of the pipes. You won't make any more money either way on the appraisal. If you have an open basement and accessing the galvanized is easy, and you need to keep that cash, you could do it the second way. If you are talking about pipes encased in walls, I would swap those out. Galvanized inside the house rarely actually leaks or breaks, by the way - the bigger problem is the pipe corrodes so bad internally that you get ridiculously low flow & water pressure from the line, and bits of corrosion break loose and clog internal water passages in appliances, get caught in valve seats, etc. 

Galvanized in the ground will eventually develop rust holes. It will be corroding from both directions (inside and out). 

@Chris Masons
@John Underwood
@JD Martin

Its a pier and beam home so we have pretty good access.The line from the street to the house though would be difficult because previous owner did a cement driveway right where the main line comes in the home. I think i would have to break all the cement and then fix. To much.

If i plan on renting and refinancing i guess it'll be ok to just do risers.

IF i end up flipping it though, i see where it would be more advantageous to just do the whole thing.

Thanks guys.

@Maugno M.

I would have the opposite view that you do.. If I was going to keep this long term and rent I would be replacing as much of the galvanized steel that I could while the opportunity is there - so later on you won't have to deal with it. As mentioned that steel pipe builds up scale and corrodes from inside and the diameter of the inside hole will continue to shrink over time. You will at some point be forced to at the least snake it which can be challenging sometimes or at worst replace it.

If it is a flip I wouldn't be as concerned and just replace from risers up or whatever currently needs to be done. Nobody is going to OOOOH and AHHHH about the fact that inside the wall plumbing has been replaced as it is not visible and long as it is currently working as it should I would not put money here but put it elsewhere to attract buyers to get property sold ASAP

Just my .02 cents..

Chris

Once you get a look at the insides of those galvanized pipes you'll replace it.   You probably won't want to drink the water after seeing the insides.

Originally posted by @Chris Masons :

@Maugno M.

You will at some point be forced to at the least snake it which can be challenging sometimes or at worst replace it.

 Man, if you could invent a snake that could clear 1/2" galvanized you'd be a rich man! :D

Originally posted by @Jon Holdman :

Once you get a look at the insides of those galvanized pipes you'll replace it.   You probably won't want to drink the water after seeing the insides.

 Unless of course you're iron deficient :D :D

@Maugno M. You can always abandoned the current main water line in place and just run a new line so that you don't have to break up the cement driveway.

A Ditchwitch can be rented from Home Depot tool rental for not too much money. It makes it easy to drop in a new line.

@John Underwood Ahhhh i see. Hadnt thought of that. Makes it extremely easier to run a new one thats right. Whole time i thought i'd have to redo the driveway.

Replacing the lines will have absolutely no value to the appraisal. However if you plane on keeping it long term I would definitely replace everything it will save you a headache in the long term and a possible lawsuit. Galvanized pipes will have lead in the water thats not a good idea when you have tenants. Also like every one stated new pipes means better pressure which is always a good thing.

JD Martin (Moderator) - Investor from Northeast, Tennessee

replied about 11 hours ago

Originally posted by @Chris Masons :

@Maugno Mora

You will at some point be forced to at the least snake it which can be challenging sometimes or at worst replace it.

Man, if you could invent a snake that could clear 1/2" galvanized you'd be a rich man! :D

Shark tank!


@Jon Holdman

@Chris Masons
@John Underwood
@JD Martin @Scott Rogers @Kadeem Wells Update. So the plumber i ended up going with ended up giving me a good deal. We were initially going to do risers up for $700. Saturday, he told me if i wanted to do all the hot water new to go get material and he'd charge me 900. I ended up going to get ALL the material, hot and cold(Red/Blue) and we ran it ALL brand new PEX. The main is coming in, is the only one i would have to do now. He ended up charging me 800. I busted my butt with him too though, all under the house and running the lines. I spent about 1100. I think its safe to say it was a good investment. Glad i did it all.

@Maugno M. That was a great investment and now that you did it with him you understand how plumbing works so it will save you in the future. Plumbing is mostly labor its not a technical skill if your not using copper.