Flooring Recommendations for SFR Rental - all areas

26 Replies

Hi all:

I would like to request recommendations for flooring in a SFR I just purchased that I intend to rent out. Looking for durable, low maintenance, but cost effective as well (like everyone else right?).

We're anti-carpet and I don't see it lasting long anyway.

I've heard a lot of good about luxury vinyl tile.  My wife is hell-bent on tile, but that is more costly and I'm concerned about maintenance and safety (especially in the bathrooms and kitchen...urine stained grout and cracked tiles where tenants drop their cast iron pan on the floor...eeek + slippery when wet!).

Also want to know what's best to be used throughout the rest of the home...if one material will serve all areas well...I'm all ears.

Also, i live in south Texas and it's very hot & humid here during most months...just in case that's a factor.

Thanks

I use Vinyl strip flooring from Surplus warehouse. It looks like hard wood floor.

It has been in some of my properties for 8 years with no problems.

The pieces have glue strips that lock them together. It is a floating floor so no glue. The quarter round trim locks in place.

It is my go to flooring.

@John Underwood

so the planks are glued to each other, but floating on the subfloor correct?  Do you mean literal glue strips or are they interlocking?

What happens if you need to replace a piece located in the middle of the floor?

do you use this material throughout the unit/house?

Originally posted by @Miles Stanley :

@John Underwood

so the planks are glued to each other, but floating on the subfloor correct?  Do you mean literal glue strips or are they interlocking?

What happens if you need to replace a piece located in the middle of the floor?

do you use this material throughout the unit/house?

 The edges interconnect via built in glue strip. Yes floating on subflooring.

I use this throughout house.

Never had to replace a piece but should be able to pry it apart and insert new piece.

@John Underwood , I agree with the vinyl--it's the way to go.  However I've had lots of experience with the product called Allure (from Home Depot) that has glue strips that have shifted and spread apart.  The manufacturer would not honor the warranty.  

Now I like a total glue-down right to the subfloor for the following reasons:  floating water-proof flooring id great until there is a small flood--if the water gets under the floating floor, where's it to go?  (Read mold).  Also, if the subfloor is not level, a floating floor will have hollow spots that will bounce.

Do you use a padding under the floating vinyl or no?  What is the brand name of the vinyl floating you use?

Originally posted by @Marc Winter :

@John Underwood, I agree with the vinyl--it's the way to go.  However I've had lots of experience with the product called Allure (from Home Depot) that has glue strips that have shifted and spread apart.  The manufacturer would not honor the warranty.  

Now I like a total glue-down right to the subfloor for the following reasons:  floating water-proof flooring id great until there is a small flood--if the water gets under the floating floor, where's it to go?  (Read mold).  Also, if the subfloor is not level, a floating floor will have hollow spots that will bounce.

Do you use a padding under the floating vinyl or no?  What is the brand name of the vinyl floating you use?

 This that I use is very flexible and forgiving with uneven floors. I do not put any padding down. It seals and keeps water out of the sub floor.

This goes down fast without the mess or expense of glue. It is all I use now on rental houses as it has held up well for me.

See if this link will work:

https://www.bartonshome.com/pr...

 www  .bartonshome.com/product/gripstrip-ec-lock-cedar-mill-6x36-vinyl-plank

A floating linoleum vinyl plank is the way to go. It is water proof and protects the sub-floor, while also being extremely durable and damage resistant. We use it in most of our rental properties and can be found for a decent price. Try using rebates through local supply stores. 

@Miles Stanley We've been using lifeproof ridged core vinyl in a few of our rentals and its been nothing but good to us, durable, low maintenance, attractive, easy to clean. That being said we have not had as much luck with existing tile, it's expensive to repair, it cracks, grout is hard to keep clean, and it can be very slippery.

We have a 100 year old house and it’s got pretty wavy floors. Is there any sort of vinyl that would work in that case (so that there’s not the lifting/gaps between flooring when you step on a plank on a dip)?

Coretec pro plus line of vinyl planks a great floor at a great price point. Much better than the big box store brands like life proof. I’m a flooring pro by trade, ask me anything

Vinyl planking is all the rage with reason, it can get wet not bother it much.
There are different grades some are water proof.

I have put vinyl planking in several SFH so far so good.

@Miles Stanley Luxury vinyl planking, easy to install and 100% waterproof. Look around for a supplier Trying to unload mass amounts for cheap.

I just put down Riverwalk Oak LVP from Lumber Liquidators.  Easy to install, waterproof, floating, lifetime warranty, and I think it looks pretty good.  If you are near a LL store, take a ride down and talk to the sales reps.  They were very helpful in my situation and the stores always have some kind of specials going on.

@Kyle Nelson Can you compare CORETec to LifeProof to explain why you think CORETec is much better?  I am looking at 2 products:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/LifeProof-Trail-Oak-8-7-in-x-47-6-in-Luxury-Vinyl-Plank-Flooring-20-06-sq-ft-case-I96713L/300461649

https://www.bestlaminate.com/coretec-pro-galaxy-cartwheel-oak-vv465-02061-spc-vinyl-flooring/

I see the price difference of $2.98sqft for LifeProof versus $2.59/sqft for CORETec.

Thanks!

@James Mc Ree

I’ve handled and dealt with both products. The core (what makes the product stable dimensionally and protects from indentation) is much better on the coretec product. It’s really a bargain price from a premium brand. On the flip side, home depot offers returns and is easy to acquire more materials from if you mismeasured. But just comparing products, I’d go with the coretec. No doubt you have a local flooring store that carries it at a similar price point.

@Miles Stanley

Another vote for LVP. Costco has a nice option in Washington State. $4 to $5/ sq ft and it goes on sale every so often. Color choices are not great but it's a solid product with something like 20 mils wear layer (some other places offer 2-3 mils wear layer, which is pretty flimsy).

We use glue down vinyl strips.  Looks very much like wood and glues directly to subfloor. We buy it a salvage store the pallet and can sometimes get it as cheap as $.50 per square foot.  Biggest advantage over carpet is simple clean up when you have an AC back up or even worse a sewer back up.  Also, no carpet cleaning cost when tenant moves out.  

Glue down vinyl planks, they look awesome and I found some at Surplus Warehouse for about a buck/sqft. I even put them in a flip 1040 countryside Ln, Montgomery, AL 36117. 

@Miles Stanley I recommend glue down vinyl plank. Looks like wood and waterproof. It’s the easiest to repair out of everything out there. Just buy yourself a few boxes to have for replacement so it matches correctly. When one gets damaged and in a rental it’s just a matter of when all you have to do is pull up that one piece and replace it. No one has talked about it but with a floating vinyl plank the proper way to repair is pull it out all the way up to the damaged spot and reinstall it. Trying to do that without damaging anything is almost impossible. Yes it can be cut out and put back in but it never looks the same and it isn’t the proper way. All the companies that offer the lifetime warranty that everyone has suggested if for the product. You still have to pay someone to do the work unless you can do it yourself. Just my opinion on it. Good luck.