Do you provide new shower curtains for your rentals?

59 Replies

We provide a cheap shower curtain that costs somewhere around four bucks with the heavy-duty shower liner that's currently 13 bucks at Big Lots. We make a point of taking our marketing pictures with these in place. We also provide curved shower rods whenever possible and at least headshower-handshower combos. I have shower towers with water jets in place in some of my rentals and external bar shower systems in others. I have $800/month rentals with oversized tubs and $900 Grohe Euphoria shower systems in them.

I think most landlords completely underestimate how much goodwill a nice shower well above a rental's price point buys them for the money spent, especially down in C-class where most setups are utterly bare bones, cramped, and seemingly purposely designed to be uncomfortable. I also rent mostly to people in health care. They tend to pay attention to things like this.

I also believe that with my current business model, the fact that I do all my own maintenance means that I can provide something many others struggle with. It's an unsubtle chance to differentiate my portfolio and my product. Taking advantage of these opportunities to shine is what keeps turnover down and the quality tenants I want in place in my properties over the long haul.

@Joe S. Yes, I always put a fresh liner up on a turnover, they can add a curtain to the rod if they want later but at least the shower is ready to use when they move in. I leave a roll of tp and paper towels too.

I always get these, I have the same one in my own bathroom and like it: Waterproof Shower Liner

I had no idea there was so much to debate about shower curtains, haha. We don't provide a curtain or hooks. We only provide a rod. We used to provide a curtain and found that tenants always switched them out. If someone leaves a curtain, we take it down. Liners get dirty and moldy over time, so a liner should always be replaced if you do leave them. I know that a curtain. liner and hooks may only cost $10 to $30 depending on quality, but our feeling is why spend the money if nobody cares. I actually think there is value in forcing a tenant to buy a curtain. They get to personalize the property to their own taste which actually makes them happier in the long run. 

Like any topic, it may vary depending on location and asset class. In some locations it may be expected to provide a shower curtain. Some lower class rentals it may be necessary to provide, so the tenant doesn't use the shower without a curtain (leading to water damage). 

We have also had properties with sliding glass shower doors. We generally remove these because they are old and nasty. After 15 years, they really need to be replaced and most of our inherited ones were installed in the 1980's when sliding shower doors were all the rage.

I do not provide shower curtains. First, they are filthy and very difficult to clean well. It's easier to trash them. Second, the shower curtain is an easy way for someone to customize the bathroom decor to their personal tastes for a very low cost.

This is interesting!  I had not thought of providing them, but I like the reasoning on why.  I like the goodwill welcome basket idea, as well. I'm going to run this by my department and see if we would like to implement this.

@Joe S.

I provide a new shower curtain liner in the rental that I self manage by my house. (All my other rentals are OOS) The reason I do this is because it’s a shower unit with a low lip so the curtain has to be fitted into a curved guide and “clipped” on the side so the water doesn’t get out and damage the walls and trim. This way I can show the new tenants how to put their shower curtain in properly and to explain how to keep the water from coming out of the shower stall, although some will just use the liner. It just cuts down on the water damage and mold that can result if tenants aren’t aware of the water spraying out.

I also provide a new filter for the hood range and ask them to replace it every six months or as needed.

Yes. If you don't, you run the risk of tenants not using one when it's actually needed. It's such a minor expense it's worth it.

Originally posted by @Jim K. :

We provide a cheap shower curtain that costs somewhere around four bucks with the heavy-duty shower liner that's currently 13 bucks at Big Lots. We make a point of taking our marketing pictures with these in place. We also provide curved shower rods whenever possible and at least headshower-handshower combos. I have shower towers with water jets in place in some of my rentals and external bar shower systems in others. I have $800/month rentals with oversized tubs and $900 Grohe Euphoria shower systems in them.

I think most landlords completely underestimate how much goodwill a nice shower well above a rental's price point buys them for the money spent, especially down in C-class where most setups are utterly bare bones, cramped, and seemingly purposely designed to be uncomfortable. I also rent mostly to people in health care. They tend to pay attention to things like this.

I also believe that with my current business model, the fact that I do all my own maintenance means that I can provide something many others struggle with. It's an unsubtle chance to differentiate my portfolio and my product. Taking advantage of these opportunities to shine is what keeps turnover down and the quality tenants I want in place in my properties over the long haul.

 Wow

Had to google what those things are you mentioned

Never heard of them before 

I have $5 shower heads in $2000/month rentals 

Fingers crossed.  Same tenants in 3 houses going on 5 years each   Haven’t had anyone move out yet 

Maintenance?    Haven’t had a maintenance call/text the entire time 

But I only rent to independent country people. Maybe different for city people?

 BTW I have a relative who rents in PB and remember them saying how they call the landlord for everything 

Originally posted by @Bernard B. :

Absolutely, I definitely provide a shower curtain ( albeit a cheap one). As mentioned in the above post, it is a nice, courteous , thing to do for a new tenant. You also have to realize that not all tenants will try to keep water damage off of your bathroom floor. If they have a shower curtain, at least you pointed them in the right direction to use it. 

Definitely.

So to avoid a $4-$10 expense, people are going to risk liner-less showering and water damage?

LOL.  Find a different hill to stake your little flags.  Provide a cheap liner. Protect your asset. 

Originally posted by @Michael Plante :
Originally posted by @Jim K.:

We provide a cheap shower curtain that costs somewhere around four bucks with the heavy-duty shower liner that's currently 13 bucks at Big Lots. We make a point of taking our marketing pictures with these in place. We also provide curved shower rods whenever possible and at least headshower-handshower combos. I have shower towers with water jets in place in some of my rentals and external bar shower systems in others. I have $800/month rentals with oversized tubs and $900 Grohe Euphoria shower systems in them.

I think most landlords completely underestimate how much goodwill a nice shower well above a rental's price point buys them for the money spent, especially down in C-class where most setups are utterly bare bones, cramped, and seemingly purposely designed to be uncomfortable. I also rent mostly to people in health care. They tend to pay attention to things like this.

I also believe that with my current business model, the fact that I do all my own maintenance means that I can provide something many others struggle with. It's an unsubtle chance to differentiate my portfolio and my product. Taking advantage of these opportunities to shine is what keeps turnover down and the quality tenants I want in place in my properties over the long haul.

 Wow

Had to google what those things are you mentioned

Never heard of them before 

I have $5 shower heads in $2000/month rentals 

Fingers crossed.  Same tenants in 3 houses going on 5 years each   Haven’t had anyone move out yet 

Maintenance?    Haven’t had a maintenance call/text the entire time 

But I only rent to independent country people. Maybe different for city people?

 BTW I have a relative who rents in PB and remember them saying how they call the landlord for everything 

I grew up in cheap rentals, and I'm not a small man. I appreciate every shower I take in a nice roomy shower with a nice shower setup that I've built myself now. Understand, I didn't actually pay for the Grohe stuff I've put in the rentals, that was part of the Home Depot Seeds free-stuff-for-reviews hustle I worked for so long. When I am paying, they get a 2-head handshower/headshower retrofit that costs $25 max. Since I put this stuff in myself, installation costs is just my time.

It differentiates my product nicely. I don't TELL these tenants that their swanky European shower setup was free for me, of course. Well, free other than producing a few hundred words of meaningless effusive praise about an overpriced water fixture.

Originally posted by @Steve Vaughan :
Originally posted by @Bernard B.:

Absolutely, I definitely provide a shower curtain ( albeit a cheap one). As mentioned in the above post, it is a nice, courteous , thing to do for a new tenant. You also have to realize that not all tenants will try to keep water damage off of your bathroom floor. If they have a shower curtain, at least you pointed them in the right direction to use it. 

Definitely.

So to avoid a $4-$10 expense, people are going to risk liner-less showering and water damage?

LOL.  Find a different hill to stake your little flags.  Provide a cheap liner. Protect your asset. 


Exactly, and when the difference between a cheap shower liner is $3 and a very good one with reinforced grommets is $13...that's ten bucks of cheap insurance, goodwill, and positive product differentiation. You can't be a slumlord if you put in a hubba-hubba shower liner, right? 

@Chris Svendsen I couldn’t agree more. Great idea! I actually haven’t done the shower curtain previously because I just haven’t thought of it. But we make everything a little nicer than those around us and charge higher rents. We are also very selective. I find that combination has attracted the best kind of tenants that are not only very happy to be there but treat the unit like it’s their own. They usually end up taking us for helping them. And I have to remind them they are helping US! 🤣 I love that Michael Scott win-win-win.

Side note: When I was in the car business in college I found that the clients who were the happiest were always the ones I made the most money on. I find the same is true in REI mostly. If they will nickel and dime you prior to a contract, don't think that same attitude goes away later.

Yes, I provide a shower liner prior to renting. They are very inexpensive, When tired from moving in the renter can shower without causing water damage. When the renter has time, they can add a colorful shower curtain to the liner I provide.
Often, extra and unexpected benefits for the renter helps to establish a good relationship. Renters are your customers. Treat them like they are very important and that you are there to provide a home for them. In return they will make you wealthy.

I stage the rental with a nice liner and curtain, but I only leave the liner behind.  It’s clearly outlined in my lease that any supplies or furnishings I leave are supplied as-is for the tenant’s convenience, and if they don’t care to use them, they can put them aside and return them.  The liner costs next to nothing, and it’s much better to supply one, properly tucked inside the walls of the tub, than to deal with puddles on the floor that could cause damage.  In doing so, hopefully I’ve given them a hint on how to care for the place. And so far, so good for the past few decades. 

P.S. I also leave a nice set of shower curtain rings that have separate sets of hooks for curtain and liner, which the tenant almost always leaves behind for the next resident.  Occasionally they get packed by mistake for the move, but it’s no biggie.