BOUGHT MY FIRST REHAB TODAY! HELP!

11 Replies

HI BP!

WE PUT OUR BACKS TO WALL AND REALITY HAS SET IN! WE ARE OFFICIALLY STARTING OUR FIRST FLIP! I'VE DONE SO MUCH RESEARCH AND FELT SO PREPARED BUT NOW FEEL LIKE A DEER IN HIGHLIGHTS! I FULLY UNDERSTAND THAT TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE SO I'M CURIOUS HOW LONG MOST FLIPPERS TAKE TO BEGIN RENOVATIONS. WE PLANNED ON WORKING WITH AN ARCHITECT FOR PLANS AND DRAWINGS. HE SAID IT WILL TAKE 10 DAYS FOR PLANS TO BE READY. WE PLAN ON LEAVING A SCOPE OF WORK FOR CONTRACTORS TO BID ON BUT IT SEEMS WE SHOULD USE THE PLANS PROVIDED BY ARCHITECT IN ORDER TO CREATE SCOPE OF WORK. IS 10DAYS TOO LONG TO WAIT FOR DRAWINGS? IS THIS STANDARD? DO YOU ALL USE ARCHITECTS?

WHAT ARE YOUR NORMAL PROCEDURES FOLLOWING CLOSING?

@Erin Silva
No need to yellūüėÜ

I'm curious as to why you're using an architect for your flip. Are you adding a floor or addition?

@Erin Silva while your waiting, start calling contractors to see availability and set appointments for them to do the bidding in 10 days. 

Also start doing any other work you can. Cleaning up the outside landscape, changing the mailbox or house numbers, various demo work, getting dumpsters on site, etc. When you are down to the final days of the project , you will be glad you did all of these small tasks in the beginning while you were waiting for the architect plans. Hope that makes sense! 

Good luck! 

lololol...ok. ok. @Lydia S.

Yes we are doing an addition. The front of the house is also very awkward and could use some architectural design elements added. 

@Erin Silva it's not unusual for them to take that long. If you haven't reached out to contractors you may find availability to be a challenge though things should be slowing down. Of course change the locks, set up an alarm, and walk the place creating and prioritizing a punch list. How extensive is your rehab, what's your budget, and are you rehabbing to rent or sell? Walk the competition if you haven't already to figure out what to prioritize.

Good luck!

Create a schedule, a budget, get out your oldest pair of jeans and a t shirt and start demo and get dirty!! Time is money, and you will learn quickly that most of it is not rocket science, but just back breaking work!! Good for the soul! ūüėĀ

@Erin Silva 10 days is light, you might need more, better do the plans right and specify what you really need done, you would need 2-4 revisions after the first set, which takes 3-5 days to re-do. Then you have to get city approval. Kick back and relax, get 1-2 guys in there and start doing demo and landscape. Your drawings should tell all your scope, or you don't need a scope because you have drawings. All you do now is draft your contract professionally and do a timeline.

As an architect I can tell you that 10 days for biddaboe working drawings is fast.  Of course I work in CA so I might have a differemt viewpoint.  

I would take this time to contact the Buolding department and clarify the process, make sure you have all the necessary documentation and fees in hand.  City approvals can be much longer than expected.  If you can schedule an appointment with the Permit office to walk them through the project it usually helps speed approvals.  Certainly take the advice of rolling your sleeves up. Any work you can do ahead of time is good.  Good Luck!

@Erin Silva , I think @Daniel Wright is right about contacting the building department and getting familiar with the process of obtaining permits. As an Architect I can tell you that 10 days may be fast to prepare biddable drawings for an addition, but if it's a small firm or sole proprietor architect doing the work, they can do it even faster. I'm not suggesting going back and pushing them, I'm just saying the time frame depends on many different factors, especially the work load for the architect. I would also suggest applying for a permit for the existing part of the house, call it "Phase I" - "as if you were not doing the addition", that way you can start demolition right away. Then you modify the permit once the architect's plans are ready, and apply for Phase II permit. In reality, Phase II would supersede and close out Phase I so you don't have two separate permits going. Let the building department know that's you plan, and they'll make recommendations. If they see you're doing your best to comply to their requirements, they'll help you out. Some jurisdictions will give you a permit on the spot (I'm referring to "Phase I without the addition", some will not, depending on the scope of work you put on the permit application. At a minimum, apply for a demolition permit and get started like others have suggested. The architect will find the exposed structure useful for his design of the addition as well while he's designing.

These are some of the things I've done to move projects along quickly. Keep us posted, and I wish you much success on your first flip - buckle your seatbelt!

@Erin Silva Also, in the future, you might consider doing the design and/or scope of work, bidding and awarding the contract before you close (after signing P&S), and you could have the contractor on the project the day after you close. That takes some risk, because of the time and money spent on design, but if you're confident that you're going to close, it saves you a lot of time. In the past I've done design work on projects that my investor/developer clients had not even closed on yet.

10 days for drawing and it could take abother 1 to 3 weeks to get the drawings approved.

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