Expoxy Countertops-Has Anyone Tried This?

15 Replies

I was looking for a way to provide a higher-end look to a rental home at a bargain price and I came across some pics/how to videos of expoxy countertops and I was wondering if anyone has tried this?  The kind that I am speaking of is a product where you can use existing countertop, wood, or cut MDF or MDX any shape that you want and then POUR (as oppose to the sponged on product) the expoxy that has color added, onto your countertop/MDF.  You can pour on and mix as many colors as you like to get the look you want.  After the product is poured on, you quickly go over it with a torch to pop the bubbles.  The look is very impressive (at least on the videos) but I wonder how it holds up to scratches overtime.  It is the same coating that they use in bars over wood but you can add color into the mix.

Here is the link to one of the brands of this:  

http://countertopepoxy.com/

Has anyone used this product and care to comment on it?

@Sandy Uhlmann  Thanks for bringing that to my attention. I have used epoxy paint in the past in some commercial jobs for floors and walls and epoxy is  a amazing product. I think I might give it a go in the future. If I do I will get back to you and let you know.

@Sandy Uhlmann  

I have never used the DIY epoxy finishes but I have had the professionals come out to spray epoxy on old, outdated tile shower surrounds and ugly old bath tubs. I had them spray my pink laminate countertops in one house too. The result was amazing! - and it seemed pretty durable. I think it's all about the surface prep. Those guys sand the surface and use some kind of acid and then a primer coat to make sure the product sticks.

Hope that helps.

I am currently remodeling my parents home and I used something similar.  Only I used this on concrete counter tops.  If your looking for relatively cheap ($10per linear ft) counter tops, I would definately suggest it.  

When I coated the concrete I had a problem with small pits causing air bubbles.  Took me some time to figure it out but it happened, and their GORGEOUS.

Looks great!   Did you just use a skim coat over existing countertops or MDF or did you make a form and pour concrete into it?

I actually made a form and poured them.  A total of 31 linear feet of countertop and a 6' x 10" section.  Lots of polishing and several coats of a self leveling epoxy, applied by a foam brush.

This is what I was talking about.  For this specific kind of epoxy you can mix the colors directly into it and pour it onto your existing counter tops, MDF, or plywood or whatever.  The additional colors are layered into it as you desire.  They also have mettallic powders in copper, grey, and other colors that you can mix directly into the epoxy.  The epoxy is self leveling, can stand up to 500degrees heat and is suppose to be safe for food preparation.   (although I would use a cutting board to cut anything) Because the color is mixed into the epoxy as opposed to just applying clear epoxy to a surface that you have sponge painted on first, the process seems less time consuming vs sponge painting the surface first.  The 1st, 2nd, and 5th pics were of  epoxy with colorant added and 3rd and 4th were of a bathroom where they sponge painted the colors on first and then applied clear epoxy.

Enchantment Copper Countertop with Black Wood Cabinets

Travertine Tile Countertop with UltraClear Epoxy Resin

@Sandy Uhlmann  

Wow! Pictures are worth a thousand words!

I've never seen epoxy like this. For a budget renovation where time is more plentiful than $$$, I would totally consider this. For an upscale remodel, the cost of granite is so affordable these days ($35-$40 per sq. ft. installed) that I'd never do anything else. The pic below is a recent remodel with custom "charcoal gray" granite with 6cm edge. It's very uniform and looks a lot like quarts countertops, but far better priced.

The bathroom shot is "white sand" granite, also with 6cm edge.

@Derek Woods  

That countertop looks very cool! In an urban loft or modern house, concrete counters like your pics above would be an awesome solution and at ten bucks per linear ft. you could save a ton of cash!

@Douglas Larson  Yes it really depends on the place.  Theirs matte finished epoxy aswell.  Theirs also form "edge inserts" that you can use to get broken edges, full bullnose, etc.  obviously color can be altered aswell.

@Sandy Uhlmann  I really like the epoxy over existing counter tops.  I'd love to see a how-I video on this if you have a link by chance.

Originally posted by @Sandy Uhlmann :

This is what I was talking about.  For this specific kind of epoxy you can mix the colors directly into it and pour it onto your existing counter tops, MDF, or plywood or whatever.  The additional colors are layered into it as you desire.  They also have metallic powders in copper, grey, and other colors that you can mix directly into the epoxy.  The epoxy is self leveling, can stand up to 500 degrees heat and is suppose to be safe for food preparation.   (although I would use a cutting board to cut anything) Because the color is mixed into the epoxy as opposed to just applying clear epoxy to a surface that you have sponge painted on first, the process seems less time consuming vs sponge painting the surface first.  The 1st, 2nd, and 5th pics were of  epoxy with colorant added and 3rd and 4th were of a bathroom where they sponge painted the colors on first and then applied clear epoxy.

Hi Sandy, 

This is Ken from Countertop Epoxy. The link you posted and the first picture is one of ours. Thank you for the great review. We are a small company with a strong focus on customer support and service. There are a lot of epoxy products out there ranging from paints to partial solids. Most are 2-6 mils thick; ours is a full 100 mils (1/10") thick of seamless, scratch resistant, solid resin. Since you posted two years ago, we've made some changes. Our current process involves two coats and metallic powders, which gives it a 3D effect with virtually any stone pattern. Our most popular patterns are White Marble, Travertine, Copper Patina, Black Galaxy, and Soapstone. We also do floors and shower walls. 

Thanks again for the great review. Please give us a call for a $50 in store credit. 

Ken 

Updated over 1 year ago

http://countertopepoxy.com/

Updated over 1 year ago

Countertop Epoxy

Originally posted by @Derek Woods :

When I coated the concrete I had a problem with small pits causing air bubbles. Took me some time to figure it out but it happened, and their GORGEOUS.

Derek, 

The reason for the air bubbles is that concrete is very porous. There is a technique for eliminating air bubbles when going over concrete with solid resin epoxy. Just give us a call for support. Thank you. 

Ken

Countertop Epoxy

Updated over 1 year ago

http://countertopepoxy.com/

I would like to piggy back on that except the question is food prep safety?  If it is anything like the epoxy used in commercial floor facilities they will last a long time and very durable.  I am interested also.

It's not epoxy but local diy bloggers from my area did Ardex on theirs and it turned out great!!

https://www.younghouselove.com/2014/03/trying-our-hand-at-ardex-concrete-counters/

Their blog is great for DIY ideas and projects.

Sorry, but for low cost, high labor counters you're so much better off doing 12" granite tiles. Mine wear like iron, oldest is 12 years and perfect.

Very curious about this!  For countertops, can you pour over any existing countertop or only certain materials?  

How durable is this?  Would it stand up to scratches/normal wear and tear better than tile/wood?

I love the finishes and think it puts a nice touch to the house, especially with the floor pour.  Thanks for any info!

Free eBook from BiggerPockets!

Ultimate Beginner's Guide Book Cover

Join BiggerPockets and get The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Real Estate Investing for FREE - read by more than 100,000 people - AND get exclusive real estate investing tips, tricks and techniques delivered straight to your inbox twice weekly!

  • Actionable advice for getting started,
  • Discover the 10 Most Lucrative Real Estate Niches,
  • Learn how to get started with or without money,
  • Explore Real-Life Strategies for Building Wealth,
  • And a LOT more.

Lock We hate spam just as much as you

Join the Largest Real Estate Investing Community

Basic membership is free, forever.