Need main water replaced South Jersey duplex

4 Replies

I am purchasing duplex, just found out after the home inspection it needs a new main water line as the old one is galvanized steel and is affecting the water pressure drastically. Seller will not give enough to cover expense. Is this a deal breaker? I’ve done some research and it is super expensive to replace which we can’t afford since we already went over budget buying the property. I am trying to get an estimate, but waiting to hear back from my agent if that is allowed. Also reached out to the township, but they don’t play a role in this as it is a homeowners responsibility. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Originally posted by @Kyle Brown :
I am purchasing duplex, just found out after the home inspection it needs a new main water line as the old one is galvanized steel and is affecting the water pressure drastically.

Seller will not give enough to cover expense. Is this a deal breaker?

I’ve done some research and it is super expensive to replace which we can’t afford since we already went over budget buying the property. I am trying to get an estimate, but waiting to hear back from my agent if that is allowed. Also reached out to the township, but they don’t play a role in this as it is a homeowners responsibility.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

 What city?

Generally minimum 4000 I have found. 

Can you bail with an inspection clause?

Hi Kurt the property is in Berlin NJ. Worst case I should be able to get out of it. I don’t want this potential investment to turn into a money pit, so hopefully it’ll work out.

Sounds like if you can’t afford/or do not want to incur that large cost of replacing the water main, then it is a deal breaker, especially if the seller will not do or cover the expense. I would walk away if the contract allows.

It’s an easy process, but can get pricey based on the depth and what needs to be dug through (and later replaced)

There snare companies that do trenchless replacement - basically a hole is dug at the curb and the new pipe is pulled through the old pipe, breaking up the old pipe in the process.

It might be a bit cheaper, but the real savings is if you don’t have to replace plantings, sidewalk, driveway, etc.