I hate College, I’m ready for real estate.

137 Replies

@Brian Wilson

Hello,

I joined the Army on june 13th and ship out june 11th( DEP) delayed enlistment program. Im a senior at high school and my mos will be 35S. You said you were intel, what was your mos?

The advice here on BiggerPockets is very good about properties and running numbers and everything related.

My opinion on college is go for it if you’re going to be an Engineer, Doctor, Lawyer, Pilot etc. if you’re going for something unrelated to business or something that will help you in real estate and you’re not close to finishing maybe you could consider dropping out.

Although I believe your question needs to be discovered by yourself or someone who knows you very well!

@Nick Quarandillo I never went to college I currently make 80k in my sales job and I just started my career in Real Estate investing. Google wholesale real estate get some books on audible it’s the way to go if you don’t have heavy cash flow from a job to fund your first deal.

@Nick Quarandillo

What about talking a few real estate classes? Take Business law for sure and real estate principles. Once you start making money it’s difficulty to find time to just learn.

You might also like macro and micro economics.

Beware you will become jaded! I'm a horrible engineer.

Originally posted by @Nick Quarandillo :

How do I get started I just want to drop out of college and get myself going on in the real estate world.

What you haven't learned yet is patience and persistence. Those two traits will protect you from doing stupid stuff and teach you to stick through to the end on the what will become the good stuff. College is about learning how to learn. Not about the specifics of what you learn (unless you are in med school or law school etc). What makes you think you will have the persistence and patience to make a 1000 calls to get a good REI deal? What makes you sure REI wont bore you in a year and you have no marketable skills to fall back on? Why cant you explore REI on the side? What would be easier about it if you quit school? Just some food for thought.

@Nick Quarandillo Can't tell you what to do but from someone who went to college, I can give you some things to think about. It's too bad you can't look at from your perspective at 50 rather than your current age of 20. I'm in that older group and have friends who didn't go to college but now wish they had. Nobody I know, who went to college, regret it. It's tough for you to fully understand that, when your paying for school and cramming for your tests. Once you graduate from high school, your in the big league. No more Easy Street. If you drop out of college it's still going to be tough in the real world too. If you stay, your degree should be your goal but your experience will give you so much more to draw from and remember. In college you have an absolute smorgasboard of intellect, experiences, people, mentors and girls and yet you still have little responsibility. Your at the perfect age for college. If you drop out, as things change in your life, with added responsibilities, marriage, kids, yada, yada, the chance of you going back is slim. Real estate investing is a great goal but if you stay in college there are so many minors or majors to enhance real estate. I now wish I'd taken some Construction Management or Architect classes. Something to give you a good financial start but a compliment to real estate. Anyway great luck and you've already proven to be smart by exploring the advantages of real estate and finding Bigger Pockets.

@Nick Quarandillo, College is not everything but I think its a good place to learn and network while you put together your plan and get your hustle together. It's good you questioning this now so when you get out you won't be spending the next 15 plus years in a job/industry you don't like.

@Nick Quarandillo

I'm a Sophomore in college with my RE Licence and am closing my first deal next week. You just gotta hustle, sacrifice, and work hard. I used to have all As and some Bs but now I tactically get Bs and Cs so I can spend less time studying and more time learning skills that produce $. I'll graduate with two solid options to make money and if I stay on track a few rentals for income. I'd reccomend getting your license with a company that deals a lot with investment properties.

@Joe Villeneuve

Unfortunately I feel as though most modern school doesn’t really teach us to learn. It teaches us to store information short term, sure. But how much do you remember from school? And what good is most of it? I barely remember topics I got A’s on from last semester in high school. People don’t retain knowledge they don’t use. I certainly don’t feel that school is pointless, but I think if you are paying for a college education they could definitely trim the fat and put a little more focus on your selected major earlier on.

Originally posted by @Cameron Dye :

@Joe Villeneuve

Unfortunately I feel as though most modern school doesn’t really teach us to learn. It teaches us to store information short term, sure. But how much do you remember from school? And what good is most of it? I barely remember topics I got A’s on from last semester in high school. People don’t retain knowledge they don’t use. I certainly don’t feel that school is pointless, but I think if you are paying for a college education they could definitely trim the fat and put a little more focus on your selected major earlier on.

I have concluded that the negative college theme is a result of how much we've become focused on "instant gratification".  We live our lives now based on the USA Today template of information...headlines with little or no background...other than that which the "messenger" allows us to receive.

The problem with this, is we lack any understanding of what makes up those "headlines", and as a result, have a hard time adjusting to anything that isn't "black and white", or delivered to us exactly as we expected ...just like the only result we know...that which was delivered by the original "messenger".

@Nick Quarandillo Hey Nick! I am in the same boat as you! I have felt like that for years every semester. I am currently a Junior at Ohio State. I think it is really tough when you are taking general education classes and want to be more into business and Real Estate classes. I will tell you that it gets better! I am having so much fun learning for the first time in a long time with school since moving into my business related classes. However, college isn’t for everyone. Maybe try to find a mentor who is doing what you want to do and meet with them regularly while you are still in school and start taking steps towards your real estate goals while you are in school. Or you could get your real estate license! Another great option if it would be a good fit for you. For me, I am trying to get experience and learn on my own outside of the classroom! And I’m crawling to the finish line with school..... it is tough but I see it worth it to keep going. But that might be different for you! Good luck with whatever you decide!

Originally posted by @Austin R. Olds :

@Brian Wilson

Hello,

I joined the Army on june 13th and ship out june 11th( DEP) delayed enlistment program. Im a senior at high school and my mos will be 35S. You said you were intel, what was your mos?

I was Navy (still in the reserves) so we had NEC's not MOS tags. I've done what you would call 35F and 35M type functions along with some other stuff. Good experience, just didn't like it enough to spend the rest of my life doing it. 

@Joe Villeneuve was making some great points just by asking you to be more specific. It is too easy to say "I don't need this." and refer to anything other than what interests you as "petty work". 

You will always have, what I believe you refer to as, "petty work" - in every single field. 

@Nick Quarandillo - Most of us here have been where you are. Sure, you could think, "What's this guy know? He probably followed the pack." Sure, I have a FT tech position that I am now working to get out of... but I decided to hustle on the side... and this weekend alone resulted in five figures for me, "on the side". 

You decide and do what's best for you. 

You are not having a college dilemma. You are having a life realization. 

It's the annoying crap, the petty work, the difficult professor, the not knowing what you don't know until you know, that actually teaches your subconscious to deal with whatever life throws at you - not necessarily the specific subject matter of an assignment that has got you annoyed, looking for an easy escape on a real estate forum.

Good luck.

@Joe Villeneuve

I like your view on things Joe. I'm 19 and a sophomore in college for civil engineering . I got my RE license and am hustling on the side to learn the investing business while making money. Keeping my options open for when I graduate.

Originally posted by @Brian Wilson :
Originally posted by @Austin R. Olds:

@Brian Wilson

Hello,

I joined the Army on june 13th and ship out june 11th( DEP) delayed enlistment program. Im a senior at high school and my mos will be 35S. You said you were intel, what was your mos?

I was Navy (still in the reserves) so we had NEC's not MOS tags. I've done what you would call 35F and 35M type functions along with some other stuff. Good experience, just didn't like it enough to spend the rest of my life doing it. 

 Thats cool, i was looking around on glassdoor and saw there are a lot of high paying jobs for intelligence, i think i will be pretty bored in this mos but the job afterwards will be worth it. Thanks for sharing your experience with me.

I felt very much the same when I was half way through school and I'm so glad I finished my degree.  I work in software now, so it's been incredibly helpful getting my real estate career started and it will be a great source of funds going forward.  If your degree has value, I'd highly recommend sticking it out.  It's a pain in the ***, but that W2 can exponentially speed up the process building your portfolio.  I think I'll be able to retire by 35 as long as I keep at it, I only got my first property recently so we will see.  Just my opinion.

@Nick Quarandillo Hey Nick, i have never  commented on biggerpockets before but this topic drew my attention. What i would recommend if you truly don't think college is for you and truly want to be an entrepreneur; i would say figure out how bad you want i, ask yourself if this is really your passion and start today to research and learn about real estate as much as you can. I don't know what your circumstances are but i can comment on what i have seen and what i believe in. There are a lot of people that will come your way telling you to proceed with caution or not to follow your passion but that's because they place their limitations on you. Truth is i can speak a lot on this matter but the short answer and most important one is figuring out your why and your mindset, if your why is strong enough and because of it your willing to do whatever it takes and sacrifice a lot of things then ignore the naysayers and continue your course. However, if your going to be just an average guy half-assing stuff, just wasting time and being lazy than you'll always be a mediocre. Its up to you; my younger brother dropped out of college, saved up some funds then even quit his job and became a full time realtor, everyone was against it by the way. In this last 4 months of being a full time in real estate agent, he has already done 5-10 transactions in a period of only 4 months and this is not even counting our fix and flip deals. He is now going to make my whole year salary 60k in less than 6 months, in his first year of real estate. This is coming from a civil engineering major by the way. Point is no one can tell you 100% what you should do but you can tell yourself what your willing to give up to achieve a successful life. Also don't only do it because of the money; because you can make money numerous ways and if money is your only motivator or you only why then you will get burned out. I recommend reading be obsessed or be average by Grant Cardone; great book. If your interested in speaking and talking about it message me and i will be happy to hold a discussion with you on this matter. 

I know there are many others with advice in this similar vein, but I am curious as to why I am seeing these threads all over here all of a sudden.

I just said it in another thread, but for every 1 person who is shown on a pedestal as being a success story having dropped out of college, there are 500 others who did not experience that success.

It sounds to me like you've hit the typical doldrums of college, where you feel like you might not be getting what you need to get out of the experience. I think that is typical, but what you need to do is to determine what you can do to change that, to get out of school what you need to get out of it for future real estate success.

In the meantime, while you are in school, work hard in looking for and creating real estate opportunities - shadow an investor, etc. - all the advice people give to young people on these types of threads.

In the end, everyone makes their own decisions, you do what feels best to you, but if it were me I stay in school, pursuing networking and real estate investing opportunities while also getting my degree.

@Nick Quarandillo I am also a college student. My friend and I have started a wholesaling business because we want to get into REI as soon as possible and this was the most logical path for us working with little money. I HIGHLY suggest you stay in college, I tell my friend this because he wants to drop out too. For me college is less about what you may be learning but about the experiences and people you meet. If I didn't go to college I wouldn't have met a lot of the people that have helped me start my wholesaling business as a freshman in college. If you drop out what do you plan to do? Live with your parents and get a minimum wage job while you try to make it to success? The people that will help you make it to success are likely the people you meet in college, not at a minimum wage job.

In terms of meaningless education you can’t get away from it but I’d get a degree in something like finance (that’s what I’m majoring in) or another business field. I picked finance to get a better understanding of investing as a whole. It’s also not a bad idea to have a degree because with a degree you can also get a job to build yourself back up much quicker than with a minimum wage job if you do fail.

I just think you gain so much from college outside of classes. You don’t really gain anything from not being in college and doing a minimum wage job instead on your path to success. If you pick the right degree (not engineering like I originally was) you’ll have plenty of time to work on your business, more than if you had to go get a job.

This is just the perspective of another college student though, as others have said it’s up to you and I don’t know your specific situation.

Feel free to reach out though if you need anything or have any questions!

Originally posted by @Alexander George :

@Joe Villeneuve was making some great points just by asking you to be more specific. It is too easy to say "I don't need this." and refer to anything other than what interests you as "petty work". 

You will always have, what I believe you refer to as, "petty work" - in every single field. 

@Nick Quarandillo - Most of us here have been where you are. Sure, you could think, "What's this guy know? He probably followed the pack." Sure, I have a FT tech position that I am now working to get out of... but I decided to hustle on the side... and this weekend alone resulted in five figures for me, "on the side". 

You decide and do what's best for you. 

You are not having a college dilemma. You are having a life realization. 

It's the annoying crap, the petty work, the difficult professor, the not knowing what you don't know until you know, that actually teaches your subconscious to deal with whatever life throws at you - not necessarily the specific subject matter of an assignment that has got you annoyed, looking for an easy escape on a real estate forum.

Good luck.

 Brilliant post.  Especially the last paragraph:  "...that actually teaches your subconscious to deal with whatever life throws at you - not necessarily the specific subject matter of an assignment..." 

@Nick Quarandillo Probably going to re-enforce what others are saying but it really depends on you. In my opinion college is a waste of time and money for probably over 50% of people that go. Mike Rowe is very outspoken on this topic. Do you enjoy working with your hands? There are a ton of trade jobs that pay very well and have paid training you could get into. Another great option is going into the military. It seems like there are a lot of successful REI's that are current or former military. VA loans with 0% down are pretty awesome. I know its possible to get into RE with little or no money but I think everyone would unanimously agree that it is much easier if you have a good paying job. Having a job that you can create savings with/ having good w2 's to get qualified for loans is a huge advantage in my opinion. Then once you get rolling you could always leave your 9-5. There are definitely jobs that college is necessary but spending 80k to get a degree in something generic or unusable doesn't make sense.

@Nick Quarandillo what do you want to do in real estate? There are a bunch of different areas to focus on.

Regardless, you're going to have some ramp up time where you're learning the ropes and it won't be much different from school. You'll get tasks that you'll hate doing, but will have to in order to succeed.

As much as I believe that people don't need the expensive college degree to be successful, if you quit, you'll be wasting what you've already put in. It's very important to learn to finish something and not just quit. Could you transfer your credits into a 2-year degree or something similar before just walking away from college?

When I was a freshman, one of my classmates decided college was a waste of time and wanted to start his career, but still wanted the degree. He figured out a way to graduate in three years by taking an accelerated schedule.

I took the opposite approach. The college I attended had a normal semester load of 18 units, but allowed students to take up to 21 units for the regular tuition cost (they charged additionally for the units above 21). Since I like to get my full money's worth, I took 21 units each semester as an upperclassman. When I filled out an application for a graduate fellowship in my senior year, I answered the "tell us about yourself" box with "I took 9 semesters of academics in 8 semesters of time" (I got the fellowship). I used the overloads to broaden my knowledge in my chosen field (electrical engineering). At that stage of my life, investing and running a business were the unthinkables for me.

I learned that education is a marathon race where I'm the only one in the race and my goal is to cross the finish line intact. There are many distractions and annoyances along the way. One view of college faculty is they are a bunch of anarchists who have nothing in common except they share a parking lot.

The book Think and Grow Rich points out where specialized knowledge fits in the success process.

Originally posted by @Jess White :
@Grant Rothenburger I think getting into an apartment community is a great idea. My wife started at 19 in the apt industry as a leasing agent with a G.E.D. and no college degree. Fast forward 5 years at 24, and she is the senior manager of a 1000 unit apartment in the Bay Area doing very well. She’s gotten the ins and outs of the industry and learned an incredible amount to help us move forward in our real estate ventures.

Read the book by Cal Newport - So Good They Cant Ignore You. Get really good at something, solve a problem, work your *** off, out work all your college friends and you will crush it in anything you do. College degree or not. I wont say whether you should continue or drop out, but dont for a second think college will be your saving grace and the only way you will be successful.

 I especially love the last sentence here "I wont say whether you should continue or drop out, but dont for a second think college will be your saving grace and the only way you will be successful." Well said sir!

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