find name of llc property owner

17 Replies

trying to find the owner of a property in ny. I see that it's owned by an llc. I then check the state department of corporations website and lookup the llc however it doesnt list the members names so it's not clear who actually owns the property.

says i can order a copy of the articles, which would give me the members, but it comes in the mail so it will be slow and costs $10.

is there any online resource where i can view this information immediately? preferably for free but i'd pay for it if i had to

if you have an attorney friend, he/she usually has access to information systems that can provide this information, such as LexisNexus, searching under the name of the LLC.

so lexisNexus will show llc members and mangers names? any other databases or info services that you know of that can provide this? I'll need this info regularly so it would be worth my subscribing to one of the services

A good LLC won't have any info publicly about the owners. The tax mailing address is available from the tax collector. And the process/service agent name and address is available from from whatever agency registers corps in your state. If you know how to search recorded docs, you may get lucky and find deeds or liens recorded under the same entity with additional info.

What it is that you want to do?

In my state you can look at the secretary of state website. The annual filings are in .pdf along with the articles and original filing.

There is a phone number, e-mail address, company name, name of a person with address etc. Maybe not all of these but usually one of these. If there is a filing agent on the owners behalf you can simply look up their name and contact them to get in touch with the owners.

I also can do a tax search with a name that has an outdated address or no address to see if any other addresses pop up that they own. When I see one where the mailing address is not different from the tax billing address and homestead exemption is taken that is likely where they live.

There are other ways as well but this is what I do first and find the people 99 percent of the time.

Sorry for the late reply. I forgot to press the notification button. We've been very happy with LexisNexis. In Arizona, the Corporation Commission is the first step, and is free to anyone visiting the site. Other posts are correct, and you can run into some "brick walls."
The information available through Lexis, without authorization, is "public record." With authorization, or legal justification, more detailed records might be accessed. I am not an authority on their services and would suggest you visit their site to learn more.

Many times you can track down a member of an LLC via the secretary of state documents. You can always track down the "registered agent" through this method. You can then contract the registered agent. A good one will not give you any member info, but will pass along what you want and you contract info to their contact within the LLC.

LLC members are not public information. This information is not kept in some database. On tax returns, if the LLC files one (not required for single member LLCs, usually), there some members may be listed. But you cannot get a tax return easily.

Part of the idea of LLCs is to put a layer of privacy between the members and the public.

If there is nothing online with the Secretary of State, go to the county recorder's office where the property is located and search the LLC name in the grantor/grantee index. Look at the actual recorded documents that you find. If the LLC has ever borrowed money or sold property, there will be a signor on the deed or deed of trust that is typically a manager or member of the LLC. Below the signature there is usually a name and title. if there is no printed name and you can't read the signature, look at the notary's acknowledgement, they usually write the person's name there. Not foolproof, but works most of the time.

Originally posted by Brian Burke:
If there is nothing online with the Secretary of State, go to the county recorder's office where the property is located and search the LLC name in the grantor/grantee index. Look at the actual recorded documents that you find. If the LLC has ever borrowed money or sold property, there will be a signor on the deed or deed of trust that is typically a manager or member of the LLC. Below the signature there is usually a name and title. if there is no printed name and you can't read the signature, look at the notary's acknowledgement, they usually write the person's name there. Not foolproof, but works most of the time.

I read a lot of recorded documents in order to find people and have found what you say to be true. While this method is not foolproof, a lot of LLCs use a member to sign or allow private mailing address to get onto recorded docs.

The requirements of each state differ. In Ohio an LLC must file its Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State (a pretty common requirement). The Articles must include an address that will be the principle place of business for the LLC. The Articles also must include the name and signature of someone authorized to file the Articles. The Articles also must include the name and address of a statutory agent, who can receive official notification of various things.

The person filing the Articles is the organizer, who does not need to be a member or manager of the LLC (I sign & file Articles for clients.) The statutory agent does not need to be a member or a manager of the organization.

Lexis can access various databases. When it comes to LLCs, the most common source of information Lexis has access to is all of the Secretaries of State - just the public records you can access yourself. However, Lexis also makes it easier to access UCC filings (public notices of liens granted to secure equipment financing and the like) - which may be of no help in learning information about LLCs involved with real estate.

Every LLC should have an EIN (and a specific person is listed as being associated with the EIN - typically a member or manager, but not necessarily), but EIN records are not available on as part of a typical Lexis subscription (at least not that I know of). There are other databases that can get information about EINs, but those searches typically cost money.

If the LLC has borrowed money, the members will typically have to give a personal guarantee, but personal guarantees and promissory notes are not matters of public record. However, if the LLC granted a mortgage to a lender, the mortgage is a matter of public record and the mortgage typically will have to be signed by a manager or member. If the LLC has ever been involved in a lawsuit, the lawsuit is a matter of public record and you can get information about the owners from the lawsuit....

It definitely makes it tough when you are trying to research info for multi-family. More than half of multi-family owners are corporations which makes data gathering for direct mail nearly impossible. I wished there were some way to do this in bulk form, but I don't think there is.