Eviction moratorium hurts the little guy

16 Replies

https://www.seattletimes.com/b...

This is an excellent example of how the eviction moratorium hurts the little guy. Immigrants, minorities, women . . . These people are trying to make a better life for themselves in the land of opportunity while improving our communities and cities. And what do they get in return? The government that claims to be looking out for the little guy instead creates policies that favor the takers and punishes the producers.

Do you feel sorry for this tenant? Sure, he lost his job and had to struggle for a bit. But I would love to see how much money he made from the stimulus checks and increased unemployment benefits. This guy has money to drink beer, smoke cigarettes, and watch his flat screen TV, but he doesn't have the time or respect for his neighbors to pick up his own trash? Why isn't he out looking for a job? 

You could drop me in that town on a Sunday morning with $1 in my pocket and I guarantee I could have a full-time job or two lined up within a week. It literally took me one minute to find there are entry-level jobs paying $14 or more and hiring right now. 

Parasites like this turn my stomach.

One thing the tenant said that was almost correct though is he is a rat, actually lower since rats don't know better.  I feel for the guy and hope he can get him out of the house.  Anyone who has money for beer and cigarettes isn't hurting that bad and he could afford something, plus the local Taco Bell is hiring starting at 15 and still cant find anyone, most retailers will hire anyone with a pulse.  Hopefully this was the last extension but I feel it will go for the rest of the year nationally and in landlord friendly areas much longer.  At a minimum I feel that if the tenant fails to apply for the rental assistance that has been offered it should be an automatic eviction.  He isn't working what else better does he have to do than apply, surely he can take a small break from his pity party.  It sounds like he is renting lower class housing though and these things are to be expected especially in certain cities and investment involves risk but I still feel bad for the guy.  While we all preach reserves no one could have been prepared for the current situation and how long our rights have been taken away to gain access to our own property.  Imagine going into Kroger and saying you have to eat so you'll pay it back when you get the money.  You would get free food and shelter but it would be in jail, I don't see much difference in this.  

Eviction moratorium suck? Absolutely.

However, the percentage of people not paying their rent is barely changed during it.

79.8% of tenants paid their April rent on time in April. Compare that to April 2019 where the rate was 82.9%. 

For February (Im using this month because 2021 and 2020 pre-covid data available) full months collection was 93.5% in 2021 and 95.1% in 2020 for a net change of 1.6%.

Collections move upward through out the month as well.  Net change is only a 3.1% change for on time and 1.6% including late payment. Yup, it sucks for those people not collecting rent, but let's not pretend there has been some huge shift in this space. 3.1%/1.6% change. But of course no one wants to tell you the numbers have barely changed because that doesnt make for good sensationalistic click bait.

https://www.nmhc.org/research-...

Originally posted by @Russell Brazil :

Eviction moratorium suck? Absolutely.

However, the percentage of people not paying their rent is barely changed during it.

I think that's true for the rental market as a whole, but certain segments of the market are hit harder. This Landlord has 20 rentals and he's never experienced so many non-paying renters or going for so long without payment and without options. Even in my market, my percentage of on-time payers may be the same, but I have two tenants that haven't paid for five months in a row, which is absolutely unheard of and would never be permitted under ordinary circumstances.

It is not business as usual and we will see Landlords foreclose or sell off investments because of it.

@Nathan G. We are still expecting to be fully collected at the end of June 2021(when the moratorium ends) by making sure all of our tenants have gotten hooked up with cares money aid (in one case I applied for the tenants) but even so the aid money has been delayed by months in each round of funding so cash flow has been extremely uneven and that makes it harder to plan.

@Russell Brazil I'm kind of surprised that the moratorium barely made a blip in the numbers not paying. I'll bet the amounts owed are much larger usual though.

@Nathan G.

I hear what you're saying, and I'm going through some of it myself with some inherited tenants right now, but let's look at some of the way the landlord here, Romeo Budhoo, SCREWED UP. I've looked carefully at the article, and this is a sob story we're getting. Here's my breakdown.

Budhoo was charging $950 to a tenant who is described as having bounced around in lots of jobs and at the time the rental contract was made, was working as "a cook making $700/week." That gives this guy a monthly income (it's probably NOT his take-home) of $3033/month. That's barely enough to satisfy 3x income-to-rent We also have the nature of the job as well -- guy's a cook, hardly the most secure employment. Did anybody twist Budhoo's arm to place this tenant?

Let's look at 1042 Cutler, the property in question. It's obviously a converted single-family turned into a duplex by some creative remodeling. 120 years old. The tenant, Alfonzo Hill, lives on the lower level. The upper level most likely rents for the same (or more, given that it's bigger). That $1900/month rent roll with this place. Now here's the kicker, Zillow values this property at $85K. Which means if this property was for sale, it's beating the 2% rule. Zillow also gives us some more information about 1040-1042 Cutler. Budhoo bought the place in 2014 for $18,500.

This is obviously D-class, high-cash-flow, zero-appreciation upstate NY housing. You don't need a microscope to see it. But go on Google Maps to check out the neighborhood and it's staring at you.

How does Budhoo drive up on 1040-1042 Cutler Street? In his 2015 Krautmobile. Slumlords can't drive Mercedes, that's the first rule of slumlording. That's just the way it is. No wonder his tenant thinks what he thinks of him.

Yeah, yeah, yeah, Budhoo pulled himself up by his own bootstraps, up from poverty, Horatio-Alger style, poor-immigrant-makes-good...I've worked for a lot less than $8/hour in my time. If Budhoo's whole 20-strong portfolio looks like this, he didn't do much for his financial security with his money. If what looks most likely here is true, he's bought himself a high-profit garbage portfolio. Look at the frequent evictions mentioned, relying on the legal system to cover his butt. Can't get insurance on these properties, can't unload them for what you're making on them, they all have major structural deficiencies, it's a whole big house of cards waiting for a match and a push.

Did the pandemic screw Budhoo? Sure. Did the tenant, Alfonzo Hill, screw Budhoo? Sure. But DID BUDHOO START FROM A POSITION OF STRENGTH? No. The article talks about him maxing out his credit cards and taking out a SECOND LOAN on his Krautmobile. The article talks about his threatening letters. That's not how you communicate successfully with D-class tenants. The bare minimum is done in writing. A slumlord is on the phone or belly-to-belly if he knows what's good for him. D-class tenants don't respect anyone who's just too busy to talk to them and weakly threaten them in writing or shake their fist at them out of the window of their Krautmobile.

Based on this behavior, does Budhoo have the faintest clue about how to protect himself financially when hard times come? Hell, no. He should have been divesting himself of weak assets like 1040-1042 Cutler and taking his losses on the chin from the beginning of the pandemic.

Back in December, I had to sell a property Zillow initially valued at $220K for 120K. You see me pissing and moaning about it here? No, because I 1030ed my money into a much better, sounder property, and decided not to cry over $100K of fantasy money. I bought the place for $100K in 2013. I did well enough.

My point is, this is not how to make it from nothing down in these property classes. You have to be a lot more savage (to use @James Wise 's term) and careful than this to be a local operator working in this kind of urban environment. That's why so many would-be D-class property barons fail. Budhoo's business model was flawed to begin with. You have to admit he did plenty to put his own neck in the noose.

I wouldn't have bought this property. I wouldn't have placed Alfonzo Hill in it. I wouldn't have nurtured the kind of relationship that Hill and Budhoo have. I wouldn't drive up in a Mercedes to hit my tenants up for money. I've never sent a threatening letter. I wouldn't have held on to these properties and chosen to go into credit card debt. Where's Budhoo's W2 job? Oh, no job to turn to if things go south on the property empire? Doesn't he have any skills to sell? Is there a Plan B?

And where's Budhoo's wife in all this? No mention? Is Budhoo trying to do this alone at this stage, just him and his garbage portfolio? Enquiring minds want to know!

Look at it, Nathan. You know the game and the score. This is a sob story. Is it sad? Sure. I'm sure Budhoo, in filing those frequent evictions mentioned pre-pandemic in the article, heard a lot of sob stories, too many to be fobbing one off on everyone else now. When you've put people on the sidewalk, you had better be prepared to take responsibility for your own damned mistakes and not go crying to the papers about your awful soul-wrenching pandemic blues and how unfair and "disrespectful" life, the gubmint, and your tenants are.

Moaning about tenants to a reporter while he's picking up garbage...seriously, Nathan, does Budhoo sound like he's built for this life to you?

As I said investment involves risk and he is finding that out the hard way.  His time would most likely be better spent at a w2 job flipping burgers and then prospecting for rent on off days and times then sitting in front of peoples house.  I really don't care that he is an immigrant or what his race is for me this is irrelevant, people are people and it doesn't get him any more or less sympathy from me.  His portfolio is very risky both in the asset class and in the state he is operating in and not something I would be interested in pursuing for any amount of money.   Where he gets sympathy from me though is he knew the rules of the game and had been able to rely on a system of checks and balances for a long time and now those scales are broken.  For him if the tenant doesn't pay you could rely on them being out in a month and a half and this is just a cost of doing business and the risk was modeled into his budget.  The difference now is the rules have changed drastically and while he is getting hit now ultimately these tenants are  going to be the ones suffering.  The article states many people are getting out and with hot markets around the us this is going to lower the number of available units which generally drives prices up.  If he is going through this many evictions and problems it sounds to me like his screening is not very good and I wouldn't be surprised if the most important part of the application was the deposit and first months rent.  This may be why he is in the situation he is in today but in the future he will hopefully screen tighter.  This should help him but marginal applicants are going to have a harder time finding housing.  

In short if you got this far I do feel bad for tenants in this situation.  Luckily all my tenants are paying but if this happened to me I could have made it through Covid but that doesn't mean I should have to.  There have been some serious oversteps by the govt and hopefully recent court decisions making the national ban unconstitutional will help out the small % of us who have been impacted.  To me what makes matters worse is this tenant could be in a much better situation due to the government aid that has been offered to landlords but many tenants are too lazy to fill out the paperwork.  The CDC declaration has you swear you are doing everything you can, by not filling out the paperwork to get the landlord paid and your debt forgiven I don't see how you are declaring this in good faith.  Some of this guys problems are self inflicted but no one could argue that he would have been in a better situation with these same tenants a couple years ago and they would have been long gone.  

Originally posted by @Jim K. :

...seriously, Nathan, does Budhoo sound like he's built for this life to you?

I agree he's not the savviest of Landlords, but c'mon, man! He's a poor immigrant that moved here and worked hard to make a better life for himself. He bought crap properties and fixed them up with money, time, and hard work. Yes, he's in a D-class market, but his system was basically working for him. Then the government stepped in.

There's nothing in the article indicating he's a slumlord. Budhoo and his fellow immigrants helped turn the city around by pouring their own money, time, and energy into a run-down housing market and now provide housing for at-risk renters that you and I wouldn't touch. If every Landlord stuck with A/B class properties, where would these renters live? Probably in housing subsidized by tax-payer dollars.

There are things you and I would do differently in his position, but that's not the point. His system was working fine until the government stepped in. This isn't about Budhoo's ability to manage money or whether you agree with him driving a Mercedes to collect rent from low-income Tenants or even his marital status (that one's just confusing). This is about the Tenant's refusal to uphold his end of the agreement. He's a 38-year-old bum that takes no personal responsibility for his situation and chooses to steal from the Landlord just because he can. Uncle Sugar allows him to do so and then treats him like a victim of circumstance, which couldn't be farther from the truth.

If it weren't for government involvement, Budhoo's system would still be working.

Originally posted by @Nathan G. :

https://www.seattletimes.com/b...

This is an excellent example of how the eviction moratorium hurts the little guy. Immigrants, minorities, women . . . These people are trying to make a better life for themselves in the land of opportunity while improving our communities and cities. And what do they get in return? The government that claims to be looking out for the little guy instead creates policies that favor the takers and punishes the producers.

Do you feel sorry for this tenant? Sure, he lost his job and had to struggle for a bit. But I would love to see how much money he made from the stimulus checks and increased unemployment benefits. This guy has money to drink beer, smoke cigarettes, and watch his flat screen TV, but he doesn't have the time or respect for his neighbors to pick up his own trash? Why isn't he out looking for a job? 

You could drop me in that town on a Sunday morning with $1 in my pocket and I guarantee I could have a full-time job or two lined up within a week. It literally took me one minute to find there are entry-level jobs paying $14 or more and hiring right now. 

Parasites like this turn my stomach.

Nathan I started a thread on the new JObs report and that is what the replys were..  here on the west coast its 15 and hour with signing bonus's  .. I saw the sign at the Panda express when I got Miss Lori some Chicken and rice lunch. big sign  15 and hour for server 16.50 for cook .. and many are offering 1000.00 signing bonuses..  this is a big problem right now.. and for sure in the PDX market with rents averaging about 1400 or so  two people making minimum wage in this metro area would be making 30 and hour  1200 a week or 4800 a month. so they do make the 3X rent on basic entry level jobs.  Now a little tougher in Seattle and SF where rents are probably over 2k.. But here in PDX no excuse.

 

@Nathan G. I agree with the article to an extent and also see both sides of the arguments above. 

The side for the tenant, it's a squeeze on the middle man for sure, and the government is not doing a good job by letting these tenants chill in a house for over a year without being able to evict them from the property after not paying rent for this long. It's a squeeze that some have felt and not all have felt. This is something that will be a yeng and yang in each party. We need to be alert to what could happen, know what states you feel comfortable investing in and what areas will provide you the best tenants (A, B, C, or D class areas).


For the landlord Budhoo, he knew the area he was getting into, the article did talk about having to keep an eviction attorney on standby for his landlord career. That means he knew it would be ugly every year or every couple of years. Something to think about when investing, back to what class of area do you want and would be willing to invest in. Is this right that the tenant or government is squeezing the little person/investor, no it's not nice, but it's not unfair. The owner Budboo bought and needed to evict people on a regular basis, so that situation was ripe for this eviction moratorium. Once again, not right by the government, but the C&D class areas typically provide higher returns and more headaches. If he went into A&B class that would have saved him a lot of effort for sure. 

Originally posted by @Nathan G. :
Originally posted by @Jim K.:

...seriously, Nathan, does Budhoo sound like he's built for this life to you?

I agree he's not the savviest of Landlords, but c'mon, man! He's a poor immigrant that moved here and worked hard to make a better life for himself. He bought crap properties and fixed them up with money, time, and hard work. Yes, he's in a D-class market, but his system was basically working for him. Then the government stepped in.

There's nothing in the article indicating he's a slumlord. Budhoo and his fellow immigrants helped turn the city around by pouring their own money, time, and energy into a run-down housing market and now provide housing for at-risk renters that you and I wouldn't touch. If every Landlord stuck with A/B class properties, where would these renters live? Probably in housing subsidized by tax-payer dollars.

There are things you and I would do differently in his position, but that's not the point. His system was working fine until the government stepped in. This isn't about Budhoo's ability to manage money or whether you agree with him driving a Mercedes to collect rent from low-income Tenants or even his marital status (that one's just confusing). This is about the Tenant's refusal to uphold his end of the agreement. He's a 38-year-old bum that takes no personal responsibility for his situation and chooses to steal from the Landlord just because he can. Uncle Sugar allows him to do so and then treats him like a victim of circumstance, which couldn't be farther from the truth.

If it weren't for government involvement, Budhoo's system would still be working.

I've said it a dozen times and I'm sure I'll say it again. Nathan, if I ever decide to invest in long-distance property management, I'm coming to you. You know what you're doing in your market segment and you do it more than passingly well. I've learned a lot from you, and I'm sure there's more to be learned. But you're not a low-income handyman landlord, Nathan. I am. And Budhoo broke the rules.

FIRST, you write that if the Budhoos of the business didn't exist, his tenants would be living in subsidized housing projects, yes. And, most likely, organized crime figures instead of Budhoo would be cashing in on them. Budhoo and his kind are useful tools in the government's hands. But so are the mental defectives who buy lottery tickets and pull the handles of slot machines. Does the government help habitual gamblers out? Or does it just ruthlessly use them? The article clearly states that Guyanese like Budhoo were lured to Schenectady and given the opportunity to buy low-cost housing. Obviously, given the acquisition price of $18.5K, 1040-1042 Cutler Street was part of this scheme. And just as obviously, Budhoo should have bought the house, and in the years that the money was rolling in, he should have figured out he was a dead duck in that property class without continuing government support, and GOTTEN OUT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. But no, the courts kept processing his evictions. Budhoo bought his Krautmobile, apparently quit whatever job he had, and assumed things would never change. He operated under the certainty that his reliance on the Schenectady legal system to keep gas in the tank would never be taken away. Budhoo made the mistake of thinking that by some magic, he could turn D-class single-family and small multifamily into A GOING CONCERN. That was a major mistake in his business plan. There isn't a single respected voice in the entire residential housing industry that will tell you that D-class can be turned into a going concern. IT SIMPLY NEVER HAPPENS.

A low-income fixer landlord simply MUST find his niche in C-class to survive. Low C-class is acceptable, sure. But the warzones will kill you. Properties that you buy for $18.5K and that you rent out for $1900/month will eventually bury you, one way or the other.


SECOND, as I have said here on BP numerous times, when you are a low-income handyman landlord, you have to follow three very basic rules. You can never outdress, outdrive, or outcrib your tenants. Budhoo and his Krautmobile Mercedes broke one of those rule. Our family car is a respectable 2015 Toyota RAV4. The car I used to use on tenant calls was a white-and-rust Honda Odyssey of indeterminate age with 200K miles on the odometer. When I was using that Honda, we were going through brand-new RAV4s every two years. We were thinking about a Volkswagon Tiguan, possibly a Lexus NX, or even the classic Greek middle class symbol of affluence, a Porsche Cayenne, for our next car buy. Thankfully, I figured out the rules in time to stop that madness. I now live within four miles of all my rentals. I take Lyft or walk to most of my service calls. If I need to bring loads of stuff, my wife drives me in or I use a rented pickup from our nearby Lowes. I cannot tell you how many rent payments in the time of COVID this wise public relations strategy must have saved me.

There are dozens of people on this site that know my last name, as you do, Nathan. So do all the Bigger Pockets administrators. Although I have gone by "Jim" my whole life, it isn't the very ethnic first name on the rent checks. I don't want my tenants searching on my very Greek first or last name and finding my contributions in these forums. I HIDE WITH PRIDE. Now granted, if you know anything about Greeks in America, you know what my legal first name is. But this "Jim K." business is good enough to keep my tenants from connecting the dots. KEEPING UP APPEARANCES IS A BIG PART of the rules, and I follow them. What my net worth happens to be is NOT GERMANE TO THIS DISCUSSION. I know guys worth three or more million in my city who choose to do one or another version of what I do. The richest guy I ever met in Greece WAS an organized crime figure. He drove a used Geo Tracker. Eventually, either the Albanian or the Bulgarian mob took him for a midnight swim and the cops found him three days later, after the crabs had been at him. He was smart about the car, dumb about his business associates. He paid the price for his stupidity.

THIRD, I threw around the term "slumlord" pretty fast and loose in my initial response. I should have used a better term, such as "D-class landlord." I agree Budhoo is emphatically not a slumlord. But as a handyman landlord, he should have realized that the risk in D-class would eventually, in one form or another, catch up to him. It doesn't take a genius.

FOURTH, I should have explained what I meant about his wife better. I would not have been able to get to where I am without my wife's working with me. No way, not even thinkable. Until we get to twenty or twenty-five units and $2-3 million in net worth, and we get there the solid way, my wife's probably still going to be working. One spouse primarily working, one spouse primarily growing the business -- that's how mom and pop self-managing handyman landlording operations have made things work in America for 140 years. That's our version of the real estate life, and why I laugh so hard when I watch the late-night infomercials with the guys on yachts bragging about making money out of thin air.

FIFTH AND FINALLY, you write that this isn't about the landlord, it's about "the Tenant's refusal to uphold his end of the agreement." Well, Nathan, that's the absolute primary reason why only organized crime figures consistently make money in D-class. Unless you're willing to chop thumbs and break legs to get your rent, your D-class tenants will always be primarily made up of people who are unable to keep their word and meet their obligations, who are looking for an out in every agreement they make, who steal whenever they can because they are what they are.

Do you know the fable of the Scorpion and the Fish? There was once a scorpion that wanted to cross a river. He went down to the water's edge and asked a fish to take him across. The fish refused because of the risk of being stung. The scorpion explained that since he wanted to get across, it was in his best interest not to sting the fish. The fish saw the logic of this and agreed to take the scorpion across. The scorpion got on the fish's back, and the fish started swimming. In the middle of the river, the scorpion stung the fish. The fish felt the sting go in and cried out, "Why did you sting me? Now we will both die!"

And, as the fish sank and died, he heard the scorpion say sadly, "I know. I could not help myself. It is my nature."

D-class tenants are exactly like the scorpion. Whether you believe that they're made that way or they acquired their nature through their life experiences, whether you believe they can be reformed or not, you don't take a risk on them if you're Budhoo or me. They're not worth a self-managing handyman landlord's efforts. In every city and town of any size in America, there are miles on miles of long-term C-class tenants with decent credit and no criminal record to speak of, who work stable, essential jobs and have long employment records. They would love to have a landlord who picks up his own phone, they would love to live in a well-maintained home in a well-chosen neighborhood backstopped by a good handyman on 24-hour call. That's the niche we prosper in. It really is, nowadays, just a matter of careful, conscious pricing, advertising, and vetting to consistently find high-quality tenants to live in the properties you provide and service.

He broke the rules, Nathan. He did not live the life he chose by the book. He stayed greedy down in D-class, blew his money on his Krautmobile, working himself further and further out on a limb, and it finally bit him in the butt. Pigs get fat, but hogs get slaughtered. Budhoo should have sold the $18,500 duplex YEARS ago.

Are the moratoriums unfair to landlords? Of course they are. Only a fool couldn't see that we are consistently being denied access to the legal system in our business. BUT WE'RE MORE THAN A YEAR INTO THE PANDEMIC. Again, Budhoo had plenty of time and both hands to find his a**. The fact that he didn't, that he just chose to go deeper and deeper into debt, throwing good money after bad, that's ALL ON HIM.

About all the D-class parasites you mention...what should we do with them? Build a big work camp for them, march them in through a gate that reads "Work Will Make You Free" and set them to manual labor, maybe building Chevys and Fords? Sterilize them? Clean up our society by eliminating the undesirables? Maybe gas the ones that were born bad?

What do you call 1,000,000 of them on the bottom of the ocean? POLLUTION!

What do you call 1,000,000,000 of them on the bottom of the ocean? SOLUTION!

That road's not for me. I prefer to find my market niche a cut above Budhoo's, and worry about other things. Do I have the arrogance to expect the gubmint to keep those D-class parasites that I choose to host in my properties in line so I can make my 20 or 30 cap off them for the better part of a decade, and then go to the papers and whine about disrespect when my scheme bites me hard? No. I'll sell most of my portfolio and get one of those $14/hour entry level jobs, more with my handyman skills and utilizing my toolset. Probably unclog toilets for Roto-Rooter or manage an apartment complex. I would live and grow stronger, while the D-class tenants could go to the devil in their own way.

Aut inveniam viam aut facium.

Hannibal's response to the generals who told him he could never get his army across the Alps to attack the Romans from the north.

"I will find a way or make one."

Jim, always a pleasure. There are many things to discuss here and you bring up many valid points that could fill an entire book. 

My main point is that government involvement tends to hurt the little guy, in this case an immigrant that our political leaders constantly claim to care about. All things being equal, Budhoo is abiding by the law and treating his tenants fairly. The tenant is shirking his personal responsibility and violating the agreement, essentially stealing from the Landlord. The government is encouraging the Tenant's bad behavior. 


Originally posted by @Nathan G. :

Jim, always a pleasure. There are many things to discuss here and you bring up many valid points that could fill an entire book. 

My main point is that government involvement tends to hurt the little guy, in this case an immigrant that our political leaders constantly claim to care about. All things being equal, Budhoo is abiding by the law and treating his tenants fairly. The tenant is shirking his personal responsibility and violating the agreement, essentially stealing from the Landlord. The government is encouraging the Tenant's bad behavior. 

You know I couldn't agree with you more. I fully agree that our political leaders very much think of immigrants as a cheap and willing labor source to do work that needs to be done, especially dirty work that many of the native-born tend to think they're better than. The tenant in this story is most obviously a good-for-nothing, stick-at-nothing, self-justifying-everything thief. The government, through multiple extensions of an ill-considered blanket policy purportedly used to combat the spread of a deadly disease and now largely without merit, is absolutely encouraging this bad behavior on the tenant's part. The moratoriums are unfair to landlords, obviously more so to smaller individual landlords than larger institutional landlords with deeper pockets.

We just disagree about this landlord in this story.

 

Originally posted by @Mary Pacinda :

Jim K, I love your response.

You do realize that I think Alfonzo Hill, the stealing tenant in this piece, should never have been given a chance to live in this apartment, right? That if it were up to me, Hill would be sleeping in a cardboard box on the sidewalk tomorrow and his daughter would be taken away from him by child and welfare services?

Thought provoking discussion!

And civil:)

Landlords should all read the book, "Who Moved My Cheese?" to understand you adapt or go out of business.

What does everyone think about South Carolina and Montana ending unemployment benefits?
https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/06...
https://www.marketwatch.com/st...