Day Use Short-Term Stays

6 Replies

Something interesting I learned last night while planning for an upcoming stay in NYC. Being as how I am taking the family on vacation, traveling NYC for a day trip as part of the vacation can be tiresome to the little ones. After researching, I found there is a new company called Nap York. In brief, they allow "rent by the half hour" pods that allow you to catch a small nap. The downfall: They're an "18+ and over only" establishment.

This drove me to search more, and find, that there are some hotels that book day use of rooms rather than an overnight room. Something to allow you to get a quick nap, wash up, or whatever it may be, for a few hours. One place even allowed you to book by the MINUTE (for instance, a $30 service charge, plus $0.16 cents a minute) with a $70 minimum (meaning you would have to book AT LEAST four hours.)

A further example: One hotel allows you to book a room from 2pm-8pm for $100. Yes, this is a little steep, but the same room rents for around $300-$400 for an overnight booking, so there is SOME affordability there. And it beats trying to find a nice quiet place in the city to catch a nap, or get a few minutes of quiet time to unwind, or even complete some business work (used to think Starbucks served this purpose.)

An interesting concept that has lead me to wonder if anyone else is taking advantage of this in conjunction with their AirBNB strategies, or any other strategy. On the surface, this may not be as popular as the high turnover would call for prompter housekeeping and cleaning, but none the less, was an interesting concept.

The only place I have seen these is in bad parts of town where prostitutes used these by the hour rooms. I saw them around Navy bases back in the 90's. So I'm a little skeptical about the clientele. 

@Dustin Verley

Day use rooms is far from a new idea, more popular in other parts of the world like South America and Asia these provide micro stays when overnight accommodations aren’t needed. In the U.S. there are several companies like DayUse.com and HotelsByDay.com which provides a platform for these services and would also do it for the STR community.

Upside is being able to rent rooms multiple times a day, more revenue..

Downside is the stigmata and very real possibility that you will be servicing others that aren’t traveling business people between meetings..

Happy Hosting

I can certainly see the value in that model, especially in urban areas like NYC (I got a LOT of value out of a day-use suitcase-storage place I used once!).  However, the high turnover and high probability that the rooms would be used for a lot more than "naps" turns me off the idea.  (nothing against a nooner, but don't want to deal with cleaning that up)

Presumably this is something one would want to do in conjunction with nightly rentals, as the nightly rentals obviously command a much higher rate, but trying to coordinate cleanings and check-ins/outs on that scale is way too much hassle IMO.  I'm happy to leave that to a bigger operation.

I was thinking the same thing as @John Underwood then I scrolled down and he said the same thing I did.

This concept could work in Nevada.  Nevermind, too many rules and organized crime to deal with.

@Michael Melendez DayUse and HBD are the two services I was actually referring to. Some of the outlets they offer are pretty reputable hotels and not what some would consider them to be. Ultimately, the reality is, quite honestly, that many hotels aren't just utilized for "sleep and relaxation." We're in a society where even one night could yield some interesting uses of a hotel room, let alone even an AirBNB. Just being frank here.

@Julie McCoy As mentioned above, the usage of a room, whether day use or overnight, isn't always about sleeping and relaxation realistically. At the end of the day, the ultimate goal is of that, yes, day use would be in conjunction with overnight renting as well. Of course, as we've touched on, the turn around would be slightly higher, but could still be a possibility with the right planning and coordination. For instance, if you utilize a full-time housekeeping staff, it may also be wise to have a couple of housekeeping staff report on a different schedule to accommodate day-use rooms.

I really don't see day-use rooms being an explosive seller, so wouldn't need a dedicated staff for day-use rooms. Again, that's just my opinion.

@Dustin Verley A generous percentage of my guests are honeymooners - I'm confident they're getting acrobatic usage out of my vacation rentals!  haha  That's really not my issue; I just wouldn't want to deal with the logistics of scheduling cleanings/turnarounds and coordinating appropriate check-in/out times for a few extra bucks, regardless of the way in which the space was used.  (besides, I'm not in a market where there would be call for such a thing anyway, so I don't have any motivation to try and figure it out)

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