Dropping out of High School.

209 Replies

I skimmed through the posts and I agree that you should stay in school. Don't be short-sighted. The path to what you want would be harder without a diploma and you might end up regretting the decision. Most successful dropouts I've heard of are at least in college, but they also have luck on their side for making it big. These people are also very few.

If your super ambitious you can graduate HS and start your business, or learn business.

Many HS students work, play on a sports team and graduate.

You are far better off getting a part time job working in a RE office, working for a PM company or working in construction AND graduating HS.

I do hiring for several different companies, not graduation HS is a huge red flag.

Build your business, or business expertise and graduate.

Don't drop out of high school. School isn't for everyone but at bare minimum stick it out!!

Why shoot for being a laborer??? Learn a skilled trade!!  Then, save some money and get into real estate little by little. 

@John Moorhouse

Stay in school and take advantage of the options it can bring instead of the ones it does not. Finish and move on, education brings knowledge and knowledge brings power. There are plenty of work study programs in high schools and alternatives, do not Quit.

@Jim K. You are assuming a lot about me, and for good reason but i want to say a few things. I never made this post like “Im dropping out today to peruse realest because school sucks and I’m going to be rich” I simply posed a question because I was curious and for other people who had that seem seed planted in their head. First thing I dont give up. Could it seem like I do in the question? Yes it does, but I dont. We need 24 high school credits to graduate, I have 18 and at the end of the year i will have 26. I did this by starting high school early. I removed all study halls, and any lunch periods. That way I was in school for 9 periods and I had 9 classes. I have already run through the business academy and some of the tech academy. All I have left in school in the classes the state forces us to take and a few others that I deem helpful. I also want to take public speaking next year.. I read through your responses and I enjoyed it because you put a lot of great advice in there. And at this point I wish I could either delete or edit my original post because more people keep commenting, which dont get me wrong I greatly appreciate, but its a lot of the same information. Please remember i tried to pose this as an idea, not something I wanted to act out on right away. Everyone has thought about dropping out, just wanting to see what people thought. Thank you for responding Jim!

What a great thread!  In life you want as many options possible, and education does indeed open doors.  Those pieces of paper can't hurt, and could very well be a blessing in the future.  Lots of people will tell you that college isn't necessary either.  I hear many people say that they regret not finishing their degree, but I hear very few people say that they are sorry they have one.

Take advantage of opportunities and enjoy the ride!

@John Moorhouse  

Most of what I would tell you has already been said, but I would like to make one point. A few people on this forum have suggested that adult life is harder/ less fun/ more boring than high school, and that you will wish to have these days back. I want you to know that that does NOT have to be true. The next two years seem long, but they are worth sticking out. And as soon as you're out in the world (diploma in hand), opportunities will open up before you, because you will have the freedom to pursue the career and life you actually want (and surround yourself with people you actually find interesting). Of course you will have more responsibility as an adult, but with that responsibility comes the opportunity to shape your future, invest in real estate, do interesting side projects, and build your life and career(s) in the direction you choose (which is much easier with an education, and surrounded by the educated people you meet along the way).

Adult life has been so much more fun for me than high school ever was. Remember to have fun now for sure, but don't let anyone scare you into thinking these are the best days of your life - they absolutely do not have to be. 

I do have a High Diploma, but no formal education e.g Associates, Bachelors, etc, however, I do own a decent portfolio rental portfolio... At least finish high school-  My suggestion, go to college and network... get a good paying profession while building a real estate portfolio, that your job is more optional than mandated... and In your 30's you should be stoned called wealthy, educated and retired. 

@John Moorhouse

Many people start this journey WHILE having W-2 jobs. It typically starts as a side hustle (at night and on weekends) because you gotta keep working to pay the bills. My point here is that Highshcool is not tying you up, as people have suggested, read books and prepare yourself on your spare time. That way, when you graduate you can dive straight into it.

The benefits of Highshcool are not always in the classes themselves. I know it may seem like a waste of time but believe me, it is not.

1. You learn to meet deadlines (something essential while working)

2. You learn to work with people (whether you like them or not) real estate is a people business so this is crucial

3. You need to learn NOT to give up (as an entrepreneur you will be tested many times)

4. Learn to do things you don’t like, we all have to do things we don’t like (especially starting out, you need to be able to focus on the bigger goal)

5. Be persistent while having a positive attitude because the path is not always straight.

You want to open as many doors as you possibly can while you are on this journey. Take opportunities from left and right and create not one but multiple streams of income. Not finishing Highshcool will definitely close some doors and might make it harder.

Good luck!

@John Moorhouse   The fact that you are reading the posts, thinking about them, and taking the advice constructively says a lot about you.  Like the others, I think high school is important.  You should be at the point that you can tailor your courses and take those that will help you succeed in business...and hopefully make it more interesting for you. 

Earlier you said "Nowadays people are getting full college educations just from using google, the downside is you dont get a diploma."  You can find a lot of information on the internet, but not all of it is correct or it merely presents one perspective or part of the story.  School is important, and no university or college isn't for everyone.  I see students everyday who shouldn't be in university and would be better off doing something else.  If you go to university or college, you should go because you want to be there.

@John Moorhouse . Finish school. You're too young and inexperienced to know what you don't know. Real estate investing involves many unpleasant tasks and requires finishing projects once they're started. Suck it up and see it through to completion. In your spare time you can educate yourself about REI. Better yet get a job and save $20K by graduation. You'll do much better in REI if you have funds to invest vs not.

@John Moorhouse Maybe ask your counselor (or do your own research if the counselor is not knowledgeable or helpful) if there are other routes to completing high school. It doesn't matter how you get there, but you do have to check that box. For example, here in FL we have Dual Enrollment and Early College programs (they may be called something else in NY) where in your last two years of HS, you can take courses at a local college for both HS and college credit. One of our kids chose this route at 15 because she despised HS. She just graduated from HS in May, and now needs only 2 classes to finish her AA degree from a nearby college, and she is barely 18. She has gained a two-year head start toward whatever she chooses to do in life, and will likely transfer to another college or university as a junior at age 18 to finish her BA degree. Our other two kids are also hacking HS this way. An added benefit is the monetary savings of doubling down on classes for those two years--Dual Enrollment tuition is covered by the county under the HS program (again, maybe this is unique to FL, and we did pay for books and supplies).  She wasn't stuck in a desk for for 7 hours a day dealing with idiots; she took all college courses, slept in til 10 and still got home around 2. It's a no-brainer for a higher achieving student. Think about it, you take almost the same courses the last two years in HS as you do the first two years in college. See if NY has a way to create a wormhole in time and fold those four years into two.  You may even get lucky enough to hook up with a college or university that offers a major in real estate. Don't rule out distance learning classes as well. My daughter had the opportunity to Dual Enroll with UF using online classes, but she really doesn't like online classes so she attended a local college. Think outside the box: it doesn't matter HOW you get to the end goal (HS diploma and preferably also college degree), you just need to get there.

@John Moorhouse My old boss was a lot like you. He hated school but was a brilliant honor student. He stayed in school (actually went to Wharton and got an MBA too) all while building a successful business on the side. Today I’d say he’s worth half a billion dollars and can often be seen interviewed on CNBC. My point is that despite the fact that he has big dreams his education was still important to him. I encourage you to do the same. At least finish finish high school and then look into other options. College isn’t for everyone especially these days. I would finish out these next two years while you continue your financial education outside of school and maybe try your hand at starting some side hustles to sharpen your business skills. Real estate will still be here when you get out. Best of luck to you!

Just remember, many of us have full time jobs, kids, spouses (who aren't fans of our investing), other businesses and we manage to squeeze in time to invest in our RE businesses too!! Not to knock your hard work in HS but I guarantee you that you can finish HS AND college with good grades, friends and build your RE business if you work at doing that. Becoming more organized and efficient everyday is something you are going to work at your whole adult life so see finishing HS along as well as creating a RE business as your new accomplishment challenge. DO NOT DROP OUT...when you are in the classroom pay attention and absorb as much as you can and when you have a bit of time free, focus on cramming in as much knowledge about the business as you can. Trust me there are many moments in RE investing that are even more boring and awful than anything you'll experience in school (how about a crawl space full of raw sewage!!). Good luck!!

@John Moorhouse You will see the benefits later. If you can't tough school out, you won't be able to tough out much else. I almost quit high School myself in my junior year. I even took the GED. But several older and wiser people convinced me to go my senior year. Develop some grit. Work hard during the summer with a contractor and start developing those relationships now. Then when school is over you can hit the ground running.

@William Coet

I do, I like to vet my contractors. Education is one of them, I’m not expecting college educated engineers to work on my house but I do expect them to have an educational competency past high school. Even a GED is fine.

I can’t speak for you, but I don’t know a contractor who hires employees without a diploma or GED in my area.

Don't drop out of high school. The world will wait. You can work for a GC on the weekends or even in the evenings. You can ask a local investor if you can shadow them for a while, offer free labor. At your age, it will be nearly impossible to acquire property anyhow, you have a golden opportunity to educate yourself for a few years and be light years ahead of your peers. 

I didn't enjoy high school either. I didn't enjoy college, but I finished. Those years taught me everything about self reliance and how to get what I wanted without help from others. Had I not had those experiences, I would not be where or who I am today. 

Especially for intelligent people like yourself, school isn't necessarily about learning the content, it's about learning how to work with others, negotiate difficult social issues and to provide others with information and products in the way they want to see them. Those skills are vital to your success as an adult- even if you think you have those skills, trust me, you don't. Stay in school, take the time to learn the game and you'll be properly prepared when the time is right.  

7Originally posted by @John Moorhouse :

@Jim K. You are assuming a lot about me, and for good reason but i want to say a few things. I never made this post like “Im dropping out today to peruse realest because school sucks and I’m going to be rich” I simply posed a question because I was curious and for other people who had that seem seed planted in their head. First thing I dont give up. Could it seem like I do in the question? Yes it does, but I dont. We need 24 high school credits to graduate, I have 18 and at the end of the year i will have 26. I did this by starting high school early. I removed all study halls, and any lunch periods. That way I was in school for 9 periods and I had 9 classes. I have already run through the business academy and some of the tech academy. All I have left in school in the classes the state forces us to take and a few others that I deem helpful. I also want to take public speaking next year.. I read through your responses and I enjoyed it because you put a lot of great advice in there. And at this point I wish I could either delete or edit my original post because more people keep commenting, which dont get me wrong I greatly appreciate, but its a lot of the same information. Please remember i tried to pose this as an idea, not something I wanted to act out on right away. Everyone has thought about dropping out, just wanting to see what people thought. Thank you for responding Jim!

You know what, John? You're right. I am assuming way, way, way too much about you. If you can drop out right now and commit to going to community college, you'll earn an equivalency diploma while you're there that no one will ever question and will be just fine for whatever US paperwork you'll ever need.

I am bitter about my own high school experience. It was a complete waste of my time. But that's its own story. What I should have done, the most reasonable thing, was get out of child care propaganda/indoctrination hell and into community college as soon as possible. I took 29 credits through ACE in my senior year. But I didn't go to community college in 1992, when I finished high school. I was an idiot. I wanted the full monty, 4 years of at an institution. And then...well, it's hard to explain, and even harder to believe.

Look, I'll send you a friend's request and we'll get into it, OK? 

@John Moorhouse

I hate to say that Most of my financially stable and successful friends dropped out of high school lol

But I still don’t agree that you should drop out. Just finish up the couple years left of schooling and you can still do your real estate thing during the process.

You sound like a brilliant kid best of luck. 🙏🏽

@John Moorhouse

Better to butcher your presentation in front of a class and get a few comments from teachers/professors than butcher it in front of investors or loan officers and fail to secure money needed for your RE venture. 

My point is high school, college, and grad schools not only offer traditional and sometimes mind numbing and way too theortrical concepts albeit useful as whole but also - and more importantly - an opportunity for you to fail and seek for advice and learn and perfect your skills with minimum consequences...because after all you are a student.

After 35 years as an educator ( teacher, counselor and admin) I totally believe that HS is not for some people. That said it is important to continue your education. Both my wife and mother did not finish HS. They took the GED and went onto college. They  have masters in education / Nursing education. They both graduated college with a  4.-0 gpa.

If you skipped a grade and have the smarts, take the ACT or SAT. IF you make the score, you can move into a JUCO and start business courses. I have several friends who are Doctors and a few of them left HS at 16 and went to college. Not having a HS diploma did not stop them from from getting hired by hospitals. But.... they are VERY few and far between.

The point is... you are only as good as your last achievement. If you leave HS, leave it for college. IF you stay in HS, take night classes at the votech to grow more skills.  Fortunes are often made and lost, but knowledge coupled with common sense and determination are the trifecta to success.

best of luck

@John Moorhouse

There are plenty of time after school to do labor & learn some construction skill. And don’t forget to enjoy your high school & college time. You won’t ever get to enjoy that time ever again.

It’s good that you want to start early, and you should. Learn as much skills as you can. However, do remember that people like to talk about their success, and less about their failure. Thus, reading BP might give you the illusion that becoming an real estate investor is easy. Heck, if it’s that easy, we would all become real estate investors and go lying in some beach resorts.

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